Posts tagged as 'wood cladding'

'Buser / Chapoton Residence' by mayer sattler-smith

This wooden single family home was designed for a professional musher, one who controls dog sledges, and is situated on a 20 acre plot at the edge of a small town surrounded by small lakes and meadows, amidst the beautiful deserted landscape of Alaska. The Anchorage based architectural practice mayer sattler-smith was asked by the family to design a “not so big house” and a view of “the” mountain from every room – what a thankful briefing.
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'Villa + Office Tardin-Pittet' by TARDIN PITTET, photo by Corinne Cuendet, Clarens

The Swiss architectural practice TARDIN PITTET realised this extension of a single family home which was built in the 1940s in the North of Lausanne. In order to gain additional space for an office the gabled roof was replaced by a flat and a second floor without slants was created. A wooden cladding was mounted on top of the old facade to improve the thermal insulation.

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Seafarer's Centre by ARK-House Architects

The Finnish based practice ARK-house Architects recently realised the new building for the Seafarer’ Centre close to the main entrance to the Helsinki’s Vuosaari harbour. With its organic shape and the use of mailny natural materials it forms a strong contrast to the crushing hectare-sized steel warehouses, and the artificial landscape of tarmac fields and container seas which dominates the area. As the only public building in the area, its role is to serve as a place of respite; a small multipurpose building for the seamen that arrive at the harbour form afar.

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'Skybox House' by Primus Arkitekter, photo by Tina Krogager

North of the island Zealand is traditionally the area where people from Copenhagen have a small and lo-fi summerhouse. The Copenhagen based practice Primus Arkitekter recently realised this modest 75m2 example which is characterised by the typical wooden cladding, large openings and several skylights.

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Tue 16.3.

‘House K’ by Sekkei-sha (JP)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 16.03.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

The Japanese architectural practice Sekkei-sha, founded by Yoshichika Takagi, designed this broad single family residence on Hokkaido, the northern Japanese island. The interior is special for its village-like central space – the living area and kitchen – which seems to be surrounded by other residential houses.

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

“Considering the cold climate in Hokkaido, it didn’t seem to be the most appropriate solution to make a wide open interior space as outdoors, yet, keeping the house shape on the exterior.
We tried to see if we could design a space that would be ‘indoor’ (which was closed in terms of the thermal environment) but would give a feeling of being ‘outdoors’ as a backdrop within the building.

The given condition of making an open indoor space led directly to the idea of making house-shaped indoor rooms. If these house shapes were scattered, it would give a village-like view.
The shape of a house is a code for dividing space indoors and outdoors, and a village is a code that implies outdoors. By using these codes, we thought that an interweaved scenery of indoor and outdoor would be made possible.”

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

“After some trials, it seemed that a set of more than 3 house shapes would give a village feeling, which would potentially create a relationship between indoor and outdoor.
If we could cover these entirely with a bigger house shape, this would function as an indoor space in terms of thermal environment.

Eventually, we managed to create a interweaved scenery between ‘indoors’ and ‘outdoors’ by placing 6 house-shaped profiles within one large exterior that envelops the entire place.
One of the six house shapes was made into an outdoor terrace. Indoors, there would be a village-like view using the help of the code for outdoors, inside the building. This kind of control functions to blur the definition of ‘indoors’ and ‘outdoors’, and this is where interweaving takes place.
As a container, we made those big house shapes as interior, but when people actually live there and use the space, the feeling of the interior switches between an indoor space to an outdoor space.
It would only be then that this idea of an interweaved living space would be expressed and perceived.”

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

'House K', photo by Seiya Miyamoto

more information about the project @ Architonic

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

The young Leipzig based architectural practice atelier st realised this single family residence in a small town in Thuringia. With features such as solar collectors and a water use chimney which supplies the rejected heat by a heat accumulator to the building again the house meets the standard of a low-energy house.

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

“In a uniform, from florid preroofs and cultivations stamped residential area, the clearly formed volume emits rest and presence. All cultivations and overhangs it was renounced. The garage was integrated unobtrusively into the building sculpture.
The rectangular and narrow construction body is cut in the ground floor and is bent. This incision forms a protected, roofed input area and separates at the same time internal functional areas in his crease points.
The prescribed roof inclination of the land-use plan was moved in theirs lower (22 °) and upper (48 °) to maximum values. With this interpretation of the editions arises, with the running around same eaves high and a suitable building width, an optimum exposure of the southern roof surfaces.”

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

“Thoroughly on the rural surroundings and the nearness to the nature the dwelling house, including the roof is wrapped up, totally in fine larch timber profiles. The structure and surface of the wood changes optically, according to weather and season. In the course of the time the facade of beige, brown, silver-grey about itself will change sometime totally to a dark grey whole appearance. To all colour default of the land-use plan are carried therefore calculation.
In the teamwork between surface-terse, vaporized solar protection glasses and deep facade incisions an atmospheric facade rich in tension originates thus between lifestyle, ecology and permanence.”

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

'Forestview' by atelier st, photo by Bertram Bölkow

to the atelier st profile @ Architonic


more information about the project @ Architonic

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

This single family villa in in Kanagawa Prefecture on a mountainside that overviews a sea and a city was designed by the Tokyo based practice Shun Hirayama Architecture. It is composed of individual volumes which are connected through tight and angled accesses, bridges and corridors.

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

“We forwarded the design, piling up stories little by little, as if animals create their nest steadily. The traces of the thoughts and processes appear remarkably. In the interior of the building that was shaped to fit the landform, walls set in diverse angles, various ceiling heights and ten different floor levels exist and in the each space dissimilar shades live. The wind that enters inside the one-room interior space feels like they came between trees, and it feels like sitting on a natural stump, when sitting on a slight level difference.

Les aventuriers” is a title of a story that tours a creation of the house on this particular site”, explains Shun Hirayama.

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Daici Ano

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Katsuhisa Kida / FOTOTECA

'Les Aventuriers' by Shun Hirayama Architecture, photo by Katsuhisa Kida / FOTOTECA

to the Shun Hirayama Architecture profile @ Architonic

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

The Bregenz based CUKROWICZ NACHBAUR ARCHITEKTEN realised this community center in St Gerold in the west of Austria.

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

“The new building of the community centre is positioned as a 4-storey building laterally shifted to the school building. School and new building develop a spatial gate situation. The building uses both existing even surfaces [the village-square to street level as well as the playground level] and places itself as a connecting element in between and contains the areas of Kindergarden, children’s game group, village shop, multipurpose room and municipality. The new center is the first 4-storey timber building of Vorarlberg. All construction units of the house are from massive wood and come mainly from forests own to municipality. They are inserted completely untreated. The compact volume is designed as a passive house and in energy-technical respect nearly self-sufficient. The building is already considered as a paradigm on the subjects of ecology, sustainability and native creation of value.”

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

St Gerold Community Center, photo by Hanspeter Schiess

Design team: Andreas Cukrowicz, Anton Nachbaur-Sturm, Stefan Abbrederis [PL], Christian Schmölz, Michael Abt.

Client: Gemeinde St.Gerold Immobilienverwaltungsges.m.b.H. & Co KG

to the CUKROWICZ NACHBAUR ARCHITEKTEN profile

to the Hanspeter Schiess website