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Posts tagged as 'Vitra'




Have a look at our first summary of this year’s novelties from the Salone del Mobile in Milan. Part II will be online soon.

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

The Basel based architects Herzog & de Meuron greatly enriched the Vitra Campus in Weil am Rhein, where architectural icons such as Alvaro Siza, Frank Gehry, Tadao Ando and Zaha Hadid carried out some of their most expressive works. Herzog & de Meuron’s stacked archetypical houses are the new domicile for Vitra’s Home Collection and will from now on be open Monday to Sunday from 10 am to 6 pm.

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

“The concept of the VitraHaus connects two themes that appear repeatedly in the oeuvre of Herzog & de Meuron: the theme of the archetypal house and the theme of stacked volumes. In Weil am Rhein, it was especially appropriate to return to the idea of the ur -house, since the primary purpose of the five-storey building is to present furnishings and objects for the home. Due to the proportions and dimensions of the interior spaces – the architects use the term ‘domestic scale’ – the showrooms are reminiscent of familiar residential settings. The individual ‘houses’, which have the general characteristics of a display space, are conceived as abstract elements. With just a few exceptions, only the gable ends are glazed, and the structural volumes seem to have been shaped with an extrusion press. Stacked into a total of five storeys and breathtakingly cantilevered up to fifteen metres in some places, the twelve houses, whose floor slabs intersect the underlying gables, create a three-dimensional assemblage – a pile of houses that, at first glance, has an almost chaotic appearance.”

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

read more about the VitraHaus @ Architonic

to the Vitra collection @ Architonic

Thu 3.12.

Molded Nature by Beat Karrer (CH)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 03.12.2009 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

Moulding pressed from PLA granulate

Moulding pressed from biodegradable PLA granulate

When half a century ago designers such as Verner Panton and Luigi Colani revolutionised people’s living rooms with their brightly coloured plastic furniture it crossed nobody’s mind that this wonder material that could be formed into any required shape would one day come to become a symbol of global rubbish and the ecological crisis.

Bioplastic made from PLA granulate, at the Vitra Workshop in Boisbuchet

Bioplastic made from PLA granulate, at the Vitra Workshop in Boisbuchet

However, there is hope: for years now international materials producers have been working on sustainable alternatives and they are now ready to launch biologically degradable plastics which can be used for a range of applications. The long-term aim is to create those everyday objects which nowadays consist of countless materials from as few components as possible in order to simplify recycling and accelerate the natural degradation process.

Material studies with biodegradable PLA fleece

Material studies with biodegradable PLA fleece

Just as with ‘normal’ plastics these bio-plastics also consist of countless chains of molecules, the polymers, which in turn are formed from a large quantity of basic components, the monomers. In contrast to synthetic polymers, which are produced from fossil raw materials, the term ‘biopolymers’ refers to the origin of the basic components for the polymers, which come from renewable resources. Biopolymers are composed of materials derived from living organisms – in other words plants, animals or bacteria. These can be starches from potatoes, wheat or maize, cellulose from vegetable cell walls or proteins such as silk, spider’s webs or hair. The properties of the material are determined by the length and molecular structure of the chains. Depending on the manufacturing process and the formulation of the material they can be regulated and optimised by additives such as natural fibres. The variety of bio-plastics which have been tested is already impressive today.

Creating a fruit bowl made from PLA fleece, at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet

Creating a fruit bowl made from PLA fleece, at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet

Creating the material is one thing but finding applications for it is another, because the cost-intensive development of new production materials is only justified by their use in series production. This is where the skills of product designers and manufacturers come in – above all those who are aiming at greater things.
One of these is the Swiss designer Beat Karrer, who together with the biochemist Michael Kangas experiments with new possibilities for processing biopolymers. The low-tech experiments in their Zurich witches’ kitchen produced promising results and these were quickly built on by cooperations with a number of materials producers and a research institute.

Beat Karrer at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet, France

Beat Karrer at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet, France

continue article @ Architonic

Wed 25.11.

‘Les Danseuses’ at the Vitra Showroom by Atelier Oï (CH)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 25.11.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Les Danseuses' by Atelier Oï

'Les Danseuses' by Atelier Oï

‘Les Danseuses’ (the dancers) is an installation the Swiss Atelier Oï designed for the Vitra Showroom in Zurich. Depending on the speed of the rotation, the bicoloured textile ensemble seems to dance over the newly decorated exhibition.

'Les Danseuses' by Atelier Oï at the Vitra Showroom in Zurich

'Les Danseuses' by Atelier Oï at the Vitra Showroom in Zurich

'Les Danseuse' by atelier oï

'Les Danseuse' by atelier oï

'Les Danseuses' by atelier oï

'Les Danseuses' by atelier oï

Vitra products @ Architonic

Atelier Oï @ Architonic

Tue 5.5.

‘Monopod’ by Jasper Morrison for Vitra

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 05.05.2009 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

'Monopod' by Jasper Morrison

'Monopod' by Jasper Morrison

Two years ago Vitra presented the original design of Jasper Morrison’s ‘Monopod’ for the first time as a cork chair which was part of the second Vitra Edition. Now the German manufacturer has, without much publicity, included an upholstered version of the chair in its collection. It must have become clear very quickly that this massive but elegantly proportioned armchair is suitable for series production after all.

The upholstered version of the limited edited cork chair

The upholstered version of the limited edited cork chair

The Monopod stands sturdily, tapering with an elegant curve to a wedge-shaped backrest. As a small visitor armchair, the Monopod is a companion for sofas and larger armchairs, and in public areas thanks to its solidity can be used in lounges and reception areas.

more Vitra products @ Architonic

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