Posts tagged as 'University'

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

The Spanish architects of SUBARQITECTURA realised these laboratories for the UMH University in Orihuela / Spain together with their collegue J.M. Torres Nadal. The building is located inside the Campus de los Desamparados in Orihuela, next to a lemon orchard. There, the conditions of light, lack of rain and heat are extreme, exceeding 40º C during the summer months.

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

“Laboratories and departments are grouped by a structure of interspersed rings, which contain a system of semi-outdoor courtyards connected with each other at different levels.

These rings are composed of three white plastic strips: the bottom one, in contact with the ground, is semi-transparent and porous, and lets you view the outside when you are sitting; the middle strip, very opaque and technical, leads the large volume of required facilities inside; and the last one, very diffuse, regulates the atmosphere and creates shadows, as a big cloud.”

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

“The semi-open courtyards become important meeting spaces, while allowing access to labs. In its technified semi-interior, conditions of light, humidity and temperature are locally modified by multiple infra-red and humidifiers.”

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

photo by Juan de la Cruz Megías

Client: UMH (Universidad Miguel Hernández)

Built Area: 1954 m2

Completed in June 2008

to the SUBARQUITECTURA website

to the J.M.Torres Nadal website

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Denmark’s first public CO2-neutral building just opened. The new building, Green Lighthouse, designed by the Danish Christensen & Co arkitekter was inaugurated on the 20th October 2009 and serves as an example in several ways. It is the first carbon neutral public building in Denmark consuming 90% less energy than the average Danish university building. 75% of the reduction of the energy consumption is due to the architectural design.

The building has made so much of a stir that it is going to serve as a showcase for sustainable building at the Climate Conference in Copenhagen in December this year.

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

The parties involved in the project are the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, the University of Copenhagen, the City of Copenhagen and the window producers VELUX and VELFAC.

“Green Lighthouse will be used by students at the Faculty of Science. In student services they will be able to get information concerning everything from career guidance to exams and subjects. Furthermore, a faculty club for scientists, and others affiliated with the faculty, will be housed in Green Lighthouse.”

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

“Green Lighthouse’s pivotal point and primary energy source is the sun. The house is 950 m2 and is constructed according to the active house principle, meaning that it generates energy. It has its own energy supply containing a combination of solar energy, heating pumps and a district heating never seen before. Green Lighthouse is an energy-efficient building of high architectural quality, allowing a great amount of daylight to enter. The natural ventilation assures plenty of fresh air and a healthy indoor climate.


Through energy design and visionary architecture, the building’s energy consumption is reduced by around 3/4 compared to present building standards. This means that the building is categorised as a class 1, low energy building according to Danish building regulations (BR 08).”

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

to the Christensen & Co arkitekter website

"Connector" for Architecture and Engineering buildings at Technical University of Lodz by formodesign

“Connector” for Architecture and Engineering buildings at Technical University of Lodz by Le 2 Workshop

The young Polish practice formodesign – founded in 2004 – designed this connection between the Architecture and Engineering building of the Technical University in Lodz.

“The challenge was to pay respect to rules dominating the existing buildings, as they were designed by well known Polish architect Boleslaw Kardaszewski (one of the University’s leading professors)”, the architects say. According to this the design is based on the existing module of 3,3m as the base dimension.

Extension of the University of Lodz

Extension of the University of Lodz

Here is what the architects say:

 

“Some factors we had to take in consideration:

- the need for fire-safety drive

- only 1st floor was available at the Architecture Department (the tall one)

- need for an elevator

- need for a small workshop on the ground floor

- both departments are situated next to a park on the side of the connector

- connect Architecture 1st floor with Engineering 2nd and 3rd floors

 

We designed a 2 storey main form which is flat-closed with a classrom on each floor. The staircase and elevator are incorporated into the construction supporting system.

The corridors, with an open view on the park, are used for exposition of student works – for educational reasons we wanted to let the students of both departments use the same expo space!

Under the main connector, on the 1st floor level, we proposed a space which connects the new and old buildings and would be used for exibitions that need to be lit only by artificial light. As this space would be mainly used for communication there is an outer garden available.

The ground level glass box hides the construction supporting columns and is used as the students’ (workshop) space with a view on the park.”

Extension by formodesign

Extension by fLe 2 Workshop

"With respect to the existing buildings, which were designed by the well known Polish architect Boleslaw Kardaszewski

With respect to the existing buildings, which were designed by the well known Polish architect Boleslaw Kardaszewski

to the Le 2 Workshop website

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

A beautiful example of modern earthen architecture is the Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts in Mexico, designed by Taller de Arquitectura- Mauricio Rocha.

The archiect decided to use the earth left behind from several other campus construction projects for the typography of his construction site – a talus which is a garden and isolation for the school at the same time. This brought about the idea of building the whole school of rammed earth. The earth for the buildings was extracted from areas around Oaxaca with the quality needed for this type of construction. Rammed earth is not only the perfect material for the extreme climatic conditions of Oaxaca, because it creates an optimal microclimate. It also offers the adequate acoustic insulation a school needs.

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

to the Taller de Arquitectura website

seen @ Earth Architecture

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

In 2006 the Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena founded Elemental – a “doing tank”, that’s how he calls the practice, which is working in association with Copec, a Chilean oil company, and the Catholic University on large-scale projects . Recentely Elemental realised their first U.S. project, dormitories and dining facilities for St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

What the architect says:

“There were 2 debates running in parallel in this project. One more explicit, declared in various documents and that were the actual programmatic requirements to be addressed. The other one, that even though was named in some documents as “compliance with Master Plan” was far less explicit and came out mainly in the meetings: it was the question of the language and appearance of the building and its relation to the old buildings of the campus.

The formal assignment was to provide the new dormitories (300 beds), dining facilities and various students’ services for St. Edward’s University in Austin Texas.”

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

“We thought that a dorm is like a monastery: it’s about how to organize a collections of repetitive small cells and how to relate them with larger special pieces. In the case of the monastery it’s about the monks’ cells and how the relate them with the refectory and chapel. Here it was about the rooms and the dining hall and common facilities. Both of them have to do with old atavist situations: sleeping, studying and eating. Or to put it in a more suggestive way: feeding the body and the soul and digesting.

There are two great examples of how to answer paradigmatically to this problem:

The first one in the late 40`s, when Alvar Aalto designed the Baker House for MIT in Cambridge, where he created a meandering form with the repetitive units to see as a foreshortened figure the Charles river and in one of the inlets of the rooms’ strip he accommodated the special piece. In a way his operation can be described as having a strip and a volume and with them create a place. (1+1=3)

The second one in the 60’s, when Louis Kahn designed the Erdman Hall, where he used the cells to enclose and define a core that worked as the special piece. Instead of adding pieces, he synthesized cells and special volume into a single operation; he actually repeated the operation 3 times. [(1+1=1) x3 = 1]“

continue @ ArchDaily

to the Alejandro Aravena website