Posts tagged as 'University'

'PO.LIN.S' by marco acerbis studio

The Bergamo based architect Marco Acerbis has been known for his designs for companies such as Alias, Desalto and Fontana Arte. With this multifunctional building for the Portogruaro Council and Portogruaro Campus (Ca’ Foscari University, Venice) he recently unveiled his newest architectural project. The Polo per l’Innovazione Strategica is certified CasaClima Class A+, it is made of eco sustainable materials and uses only renewable energy fonts like FV solar panels and geothermal power.

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Svalbard Science Centre 78°north by Jarmund / Vigsnæs AS Architects MNAL, photo by Nils Petter Dale / nispe@datho.no

This extension of an existing university and research building in Svalbard (Spitzbergen), in the very north of Norway was realised by the Oslo based Jarmund / Vigsnæs AS Architects MNAL. The construction which also provides new facilities for the Svalbard Museum is characterised by a faceted insulated copper-clad skin. Its shape is the result of climatic 3D simulations which have been undertaken in order to assure that the accumulation of snow would not create undesired conditions in front of doors and windows.

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Universita Luigi Bocconi by Grafton Architects, photo by Federico Brunetti

The Dublin based architectural practice Grafton Architects was founded by Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara in 1978. Not long ago, in 2008 they realised the new building for the private Università Luigi Bocconi which hosts most of the research centers and institutes. When you pass the imposing monolith you will notice its beautiful materiality. The facade is constructed in a robust material, Ceppo, the local stone of Milan.

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Middle East Technical University Modsimmer Modelling and Simulation Research Center, photo by Yunus Özkazanç – Kerem Yazgan

The Turkish architectural practice YAZGAN Design-Architecture-Construction designed the Modelling and Simulation Research Center for the Middle East Technical University Modsimmer in their hometown Ankara. The building’s composition is based on consecutive functional strips: sun shading steel frame, the eye-catching facade strip made from painted glass in five different colors, the strip of work spaces, storage, counter, shaft, door band, circulation band, atrium and the mirror coated pool base.

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Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

The Technology College of Barreiro has been awarded the International Architecture Award for the Best New Global Design 2009 by the Chicago Athenaeum, Architect and Design Museum. It has also been shortlisted for ENOR 2009 and FAD 2009, the results of which will be announced in the next couple of months. Located on the outskirts of Lisbon the college was designed by ARX Portugal, the firm lead by brothers Nuno and José Mateus.

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

“The building site assigned for the School is located in the outskirts of the city of Barreiro. These are rural territories which were invaded by recent constructions intersecting green-gardens and reed plots. Residence houses are predominant and other functions were not predicted for this area and so this neighbourhood is now just a suburb with little urban life. The soil, however, is quite interesting: broad, softly inclined and well-related with its shape – unevenness of 13,12 feet in perimeter to north and south – having at one end a dense forest of cork and large pine trees.”

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

“There are some projects that cause a public reaction even before its existence, and there one can find a great deal of important matters to consider. This school is such an example. The inhabitants of this “neighbourhood” protested against its existence because they wanted a primary school instead – which was transferred elsewhere –, but also because they feared the impact a building of large proportions would have, both visually and ecologically. Fearing that the trees would be cut down, they counted and marked every single one.

We aimed at imprinting to the building a somewhat ambiguous character. On one hand it “dissipates” and accepts the prevalence of the natural elements, on the other hand it deals with their presence as an artificial element of abstract origin. This principle is highlighted by the constructive choices: big coal-grey block that, when sectioned, reveals a white interior.

The architecture becomes more topographic in one of the extremities of the building, where there is no way to tell where the surrounding starts or ends, and in the opposite side, with its more present limits, defined by the alignment of the tops of the different bodies of the building.”

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Construction: 2005 – 07

Architecture: ARX PORTUGAL, Arquitectos Lda., José Mateus, Nuno Mateus

Project Team: Paulo Rocha, Stefano Riva, Andreia Tomé, Clara Martins, Marco Roque Antunes, Nuno Grancho, Pedro Alves, Pedro Dourado, Pedro Sousa, Tânia Pedro, Francisco Marques, Sónia Luz

Landscape Architecture: GLOBAL, Arquitectura Paisagista Lda.

Structural Engineering: TAL PROJECTO, Projectos, Estudos e Projectos de Engenharia Lda.

Electrical and Telecomunications Planning, Security Planning, Mechanical Planning: AT, Serviços de Engenharia Electrontécnica e Electrónica Lda.

Sanitary Planning: AQUADOMUS, Consultores Lda.

Contractor: Obrecol

Gross Construction Surface: 10 500 m2

to the ARX Portugal Arquitectos website

seen at World Architecture News

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

In close collaboration the Dutch practices Studio Roelof Mulder and bureau Ira Koers realised the new interior design for the Library of the University of Amsterdam. The project won The Great Indoors Award 2009 in the category Serve & Facilitate.

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“A library whose decor no longer consists of books has been turned into a ‘home’ in which to study.

The UvA’s enormous collection of books is kept in closed repositories, book depots and at various open locations. A growing number of students, anywhere from 1500 to 5000, visit the University Library every day in order to study and pick up their digitally ordered books. Despite plans for a new building in the future, the university wished to have a new, temporary interior design for the 2500 m2 space that would comprise study rooms plus 235 extra workspaces, the canteen, the information centre with its desk, the hallways, and an automated lending area.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“To offer students a good second home, we wanted to achieve two important things: a space like the white page of a book where the students themselves would play the main role in determining how it is filled in, and in certain areas a domestic atmosphere where the students could also study informally.

For instance, in one of the study rooms you will find a number of kitchen tables where you can work in groups under the lamp, a chesterfield couch for reading a newspaper, various sitting areas for a short break and special telephone areas in the hallways between the quiet study rooms. The columns in the canteen are transformed into illuminated trees with low energy light bulbs.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“Until recently, borrowed books could only be picked up at the library desk during office hours.

Now the students can pick up their ordered books themselves in a newly designed red room that is open until midnight, including weekends. In red cases with 1105 red crates, piles of books lie ready for the borrowers. Because these books come from different locations, this is the heart of the University Library, with a back office hidden from view in which the books are readied for self-service with the RFID system.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

to the bureau Ira Koers website

to the Studio Roelof Mulder website

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob't Hart

The Dutch architects of MVRDV designed this tribune, a new think tank called ‘‘The Why Factory’’, at the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. The project was awarded with this year’s LAi prize. The flexible furniture are designed by Richard Hutten.

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob't Hart

“After a fire destroyed their premises, The Why Factory and the faculty of architecture of Delft University moved into the former main building of the university. An interior courtyard was created and designated as the new residence of The Why Factory. MVRDV designed the three floor tall wooden structure, containing lecture halls, meeting rooms and the premises of the research institute. An auditorium stair climbs to the top, literally putting the students on top of their teachers.

The structure distinguishes itself by its bright orange colour which clearly identifies The Why Factory as an independent research centre within the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology. Furniture designer Richard Hutten designed flexible furniture to allow the space around the tribune to switch function between research hall, lecture hall and exhibition space.”

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by TU Delft

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob’t Hart

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob’t Hart

Client: TU Delft

Budget: 150.000 Euro (Construction)

Surface: 370m2 Tribune and 195m2 orange floor

Site :950m2

Location: Julianalaan Delft, Netherlands

Projectteam: Winy Maas, Jacob van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries with Anton Wubben, Riccardo Ferrari, Simon Potier, Jonas Klock and Diana Lopez

Engineering: Braaksma&Roos Architectenbureau, Den Haag

Contractor: Meesterbouw BV , Den Haag

Interior: Meesterbouw BV , Den Haag

Furniture: Richard Hutten, Rotterdam, NL

Electrical Installations E.T.A.B. de Vest, Delft

Installations Cofely West Utiliteit BV, Rijswijk

Lighting: Henk van der Geest, Amsterdam, NL

Floor finishes Cem Plaat BV, Enschede

Loose furniture (chairs etc.) Vitra, Ouderkerk aan de Amstel

Construction: ABT

to the MVRDV website

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects

The Helsinki based SARC Architects designed the new building for The Finnish Forest Research Institutes (METLA) in Joensuu in the east if Finland. The building is situated at the Joensuu University campus-area, in the close vicinity of the city centre.

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architecture, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architecture, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The staff of Joensuu Forest Research Institute was growing until the end of 2005 up to 150-170 employees, of which 100 were permanent staff members, from 110 employees, including 60 researches, working at the Research Institute. This growth necessitated the building of new workspaces, because of the insufficiency of the existing facilities.

The Research Institute’s task is to undertake applied forestry research which supports the regional enterprise activities and forest related regional economic, social and ecological development. One of the Research Institutes seven focus areas is the research of wooden materials.”

Walls made of 100 years timber, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Walls made of 100 years timber, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The primary goal of the construction project was to use Finnish wood in innovative ways. Hence, wood is the main material used throughout the building, from the post-beam-slab -system in the structural frame to the exterior cladding. The building fits in the cityscape in respect to its size, which is closely related to the adjoining buildings. However, the clear form and the uniform materiality achieved through the extensive use of wood make it a distinct entity.

The workspaces in the building surround a central courtyard and lobby. The entrance to the courtyard is flanked by walls made of 100-year old timber. The courtyard itself is lifted above the buildings immediate surroundings, and with the lobby and its restaurant form a meeting point for the staff of the Forest Research Institute.

The courtyard is dominated by tall pine trees growing through the terrace, a conference space that resembles an overturned boat and fish-chest inspired tilted wooden columns.”

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by  Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Finnish Forest Research Institute by SARC Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

more architect’s projects @ Architonic