Posts tagged as 'sustainable'

'Float House' for the Make It Right Foundation by Morphosis

'Float House' for the Make It Right Foundation by Morphosis

Morphosis Architects designed this eclectic single family house for New Orleans’ Lower Ninth Ward, an area which was completely distroyed by Hurricane Katrina and which is now site for the new designs of the Make It Right Foundation. The L.A. based practice created a house which broaches the issue of the catastrophy the city was confronted with – it would float if New Orleans floods.

'Float House' by Morphosis

'Float House' by Morphosis

Here is what the Architects explain:

The FLOAT House optimizes the efficiency of mass-production, while respecting New Orleans’s unique culture and context. The Ninth Ward’s colorful vernacular houses, which local residents have traditionally modified and personalized over time, reflect the community’s vibrant culture. The FLOAT House grows out of the indigenous typology of the shotgun house, predominant throughout New Orleans and the Lower Ninth Ward. Like a typical shotgun house, the FLOAT House sits atop a raised base. This innovative base, or “chassis,” integrates all mechanical, electrical, plumbing and sustainable systems, and securely floats in case of flooding. Inspired by GM’s skateboard chassis, which is engineered to support several car body types, the FLOAT House’s chassis is designed to support a variety of customizable house configurations.

Developed to meet the needs of families in New Orleans’s Lower Ninth Ward, the FLOAT House is a prototype for prefabricated, affordable housing that can be adapted to the needs of flood zones worldwide. The FLOAT House is assembled on-site from pre-fabricated components:

The modular chassis is pre-fabricated as a single unit of expanded polystyrene foam coated in glass fiber reinforced concrete, with all required wall anchors, electrical, mechanical and plumbing systems pre-installed. The chassis module is shipped whole from factory to site, via standard flat bed trailer.
The piers that anchor the house to the ground and the concrete pads on which the chassis sits are constructed on-site, using local labor and conventional construction techniques.
The panelized walls, windows, interior finishes and kit-of parts roof are prefabricated, to be assembled on-site along with the installation of fixtures and appliances. This efficient approach integrates modern mass-production with traditional site construction to lower costs, guarantee quality, and reduce waste.

to the Morphosis website

to the Make It Right website

Taliesin Mod.FabTM, 600-square-foot prototype

Taliesin Mod.FabTM, 600-square-foot prototype

The Taliesin Mod.FabTM is an example of simple, elegant, and sustainable living in the desert. The one-bedroom, 600-square-foot prototype residence relies on panelized construction to allow for speed and economy on site or in a factory. It can be connected to utilities or be “unplugged,” relying on low-consumption fixtures, rainwater harvesting, greywater re-use, natural ventilation, solar orientation, and photovoltaics to reduce energy and water use. The structure is dimensioned and engineered to be transportable via roadway.

Taliesin Mod.FabTM designed and built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Taliesin Mod.FabTM designed and built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The Taliesin Mod.FabTM was designed and built by graduate and undergraduate students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture with the faculty guidance of Michael P. Johnson and Jennifer Siegal, project manager Christian Butler, recent M.Arch graduate, and assistant project manager Nick Mancusi, current BAS student.

One bedroom prefabricated house

One bedroom prefabricated house

Taliesin Mod.FabTM by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Taliesin Mod.FabTM by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Student participants in design and construction (alphabetical): Dakotah Apostolou, Ebbie Azimi, Thai Blackburn, Christian Butler, Jillian Brooks, Emil Crystal, Michael DesBarres, Daniel Dillow, Dave Frazee, Jeff Graham, Ryan Hewson, Erik Krautbauer, Nick Mancusi, Marietta Pagkalou, Lauren Rybinski, Andrea Tejada, Maya Ward-Karet, Hui Ee Wong, Todd Lehmenkuler, Russell Mahoney, Simon DeAguerro, Taryn Seymour

seen @ Arkinetia

to the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

A beautiful example of modern earthen architecture is the Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts in Mexico, designed by Taller de Arquitectura- Mauricio Rocha.

The archiect decided to use the earth left behind from several other campus construction projects for the typography of his construction site – a talus which is a garden and isolation for the school at the same time. This brought about the idea of building the whole school of rammed earth. The earth for the buildings was extracted from areas around Oaxaca with the quality needed for this type of construction. Rammed earth is not only the perfect material for the extreme climatic conditions of Oaxaca, because it creates an optimal microclimate. It also offers the adequate acoustic insulation a school needs.

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

to the Taller de Arquitectura website

seen @ Earth Architecture

West Basin House by Signer Harris Architects

West Basin House by Signer Harris Architects

This year´s winners of the Boston Society of Architects in the category Sustainability Citation have been Signer Harris Architects with their ‘West Basin House’ in New Mexico, a 7000 sf-extension of a traditional New Mexican residence building.

Independent from the electric utility grid

Independent from the electric utility grid

The goals of the architects were to create a home truly reflective of the site and the local culture and implement the principles of sustainable design and material selections – including the use of solar electrich panels for generating power and leaving the home completely off the electric utility grid. Understandable that it was a challenge to adress the desire of the client to have an “antique home of traditional architecture” on the one hand avoiding cliché on the other hand.

7000sf extension of an existing traditional residence building

7000sf extension of an existing traditional residence building

Here the design response:

We created a traditional courtyard plan where each component – living room/kitchen, bedrooms, and master bedroom – is connected only by exterior portals (vernacular term for “covered porches”). The courtyard elements should frame views of the ranch lands and mountains. We tried to vary the design of each component in an evolving architectural style – from the traditional living/dining/kitchen building at the core of the home, to what appear to be more recently constructed bedroom and master suite buildings around the courtyard. The design variations suggest a narrative and an evolution of the home, providing a sense of history and the character that comes with age. We took advantage of sustainable materials, such as autoclaved aerated concrete blocks, that inherently support natural responses to environmental conditions. In adition to that we incorporated a full array of photovoltaic panels, solar heating panels, batteries, and other technologies to allow for modern living in this energy independent home.

Water Basin House by Signer Harris Architects

West Basin House by Signer Harris Architects

to the Signer Harris Architects website

seen @ Materialiciuos

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

Earth – many of us see it as a rather primitive building material used for rural housing of third worlds areas. In fact mud brick and rammed or compressed earth, some of the world´s oldest and most applied building materials, are increasingly becoming the focus of modern architecture – not only for their ecological benefits but also for their efficient building insulation and climate control.

Earth as the main building material

Earth as the main building material

A representative example is the Redding Residence by the US architects of the Kendle Design Cooperative. Using the soil from the site as a primary building material the luxurious residence is discreetly integrated into its direct sourroundings.

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

What the architects say:

“Sustainable building techniques are used extensively throughout the design of this home. These include extensive overhangs that protect both interior and exterior living spaces from the desert sun, rammed earth construction and low-E glazing to mitigate heat gain through the exterior walls, indirect daylighting to avoid glare and minimize need for electric lighting, 19 seer air conditioning units with zoned distribution, smart house technologies controlling lighting, mechanical and powered shading devices, building materials made from recycled content and xeriscape design. These along with a host of additional “Green” building techniques qualified this home for the Advanced Level Category of the Scottsdale Green Building rating system.”

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

Redding Residence by Kendle Design Cooperative

Location: Scottsdale, Arizona

Livable Area: 8300 square feet

Date Completed: Summer 2007

to the Kendle Design Cooperative website

'Duetto 2' by Hanna Korvela

'Duetto 2' by Hanna Korvela

The Finnish textile company Hann Korvala Design was founded in 1994, when the young textile designer Hanna Korvela realised her first ‘Duetto’ rug. Since then, she received several international awards and works in close cooperation with architects and interior designers and realises comprehensive, tailor-made interior design and art works for both private homes and public premises.

Recently Hanna presented new editions of her classics ‘Duetto’ and ‘Encore’.

'Duetto 2' by Hanna Korvela

'Duetto 2' by Hanna Korvela

Duetto’s base is the geometrical rhythmic of two natural materials, paper yarn and cotton. In ‘Duetto 2′ the natural tone of the paper yarn has been replaced by pure white.

‘Duetto 2′ as well as ‘Encore 2′ is dust-free, durable and recyclable. As a cooperation product of Finnish Allergy and Asthma association, both carpets are perfect choices for allergic homes.

'Encore 2' by Hanna Korvela

'Encore 2' by Hanna Korvela

more Hanna Korvela Design products @ Architonic

Tue 16.6.

Grand Pari(s)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 16.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , , ,

Balconies covered in plants decorate the Seventies' Tour Montparnasse: Jean Nouvel, Jean-Marie Duthilleul and Michel Cantal-Dupart, based on a sketch by Frank Gehry

Balconies covered in plants decorate the Seventies' Tour Montparnasse: Jean Nouvel, Jean-Marie Duthilleul and Michel Cantal-Dupart, based on a sketch by Frank Gehry

“We have to think big”, said President Sarkozy on 30 April 2009 at the opening of the exhibition at the Palais de Chaillot, where ten of thirty-seven future models for the re-design of Paris are on display.

Paris is divided by an urban motorway which was built around the centre in 1973. This ‘boulevard périphérique’ diverts the traffic around and into the city and it regularly grinds to a halt, in spite of having up to eight lanes in each direction. Today it is one of Europe’s busiest roads.

Sustainable architecture: design by Atelier Castro Denissof Casi

Sustainable architecture: design by Atelier Castro Denissof Casi

Necessity is now going to be turned into sustainable development. Accordingly at the opening of the ‘Cité de l’architecture et du patrimoine’ at the Palais de Chaillot in the autumn of 2007 the French president called for a “diagnosis of the urban landscape and visions for the coming twenty to forty years”, inviting forty-three working groups of architects and town planners to submit ideas for a competition. The results are to be seen in this exhibition.

continue article @ Architonic

'Plié' by Olivier Sottas

'Plié' by Olivier Sottas

The Swiss designer Olivier Sottas presented at this year´s DMY Festival in Berlin ‘Plié’, a series of floor lamps. The lamps are composed of a paper lampshade, which gets its structure and stability from the artful folding, and a base made of thin plywood pieces. Unassembled it can be sent flat-packed. For its lightness and its biodegradable materials ‘Plié’ is impressive in terms of sustainability.

'Plié' available in three sizes

'Plié' available in three sizes

to the Olivier Sottas website