Posts tagged as 'sustainable'

'Paperpulp' cabinets by Debbie Wijskamp

The Dutch designer and member of the Temporary Collective Arnhem Debbie Wijskamp realised this edition of rather solid looking cabinets made from handmade paperpulp.

'Paperpulp' cabinets by Debbie Wijskamp

“Inspired by different cultures, making their homes with materials found in their surroundings, Wijskamp wanted to design her own building material. Experimenting with the re-usage of wastepaper resulted in a material with its own characteristic appearance and structure. Besides this, it is a very versatile material with many possible applications.”

'Paperpulp' cabinets by Debbie Wijskamp

The Temporary Collective Arnhem will also be exhibiting at the DMY festival in Berlin from 9-13 June 2010.

'Paperpulp' cabinets by Debbie Wijskamp





to the Debbie Wijskamp website

to the Temporary Collective Arnhem

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

With his ‘LoftCube’ the Berlin based interior architect and designer Werner Aisslinger introduced an architectural prefabricated add-on for urban spaces. His new ‘Fincube’ builds the equivalent “hideaway-innature” solitaire. Developed with a South Tyrolian team, the ‘Fincube’ was created 1200m above sea level near Bozen in Northern Italy.

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

Sustainable nomadic house
“Made entirely of local wood, the building provides 47 sqm of living space with a minimal CO2 footprint: local suppliers and local crafts using local long-lasting and recyclable materials manufactured with the precision and care of tyrolese handwork. The Fincube is a materialized vision of a small housing unit with a long lifecycle. It can easily be dismantled and rebuilt on a new site, and even more important for nature hideaways: it requires minimum soil sealing – just 2 sqm that are easily renatured after the Fincube is moved to another location.”

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

Long-lasting design
“The design is minimal, material-orientated, and in close touch with nature – the wooden space with a 360-degree triple glazing is furnished with a second facade layer, producing shade and giving the building a unique overall mushroom-like monoshape. The horizontal ledges give privacy to the Fincube and embed the building into forests, meadows, mountain sides or any nature resorts. The combination of long-lasting design and the option of changing its location after a while make the Fincube a flexible home or hideaway and a lifetime companion.”

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

more information about the project @ Architonic

to the Studio Aisslinger profile @ Architonic

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

The Zurich based architect and designer Rafael Schmidt submitted this new bike sharing system to a competition which was organised within last year’s International Climate Conference in Copenhagen. The system involves a comprehensive architectural intervention into the urban centre.

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

“The Bike Share System must become more than just a transporting system. It deals not only with the problem of stocks and flows of people, but must add extra value to its user and to the city itself. We suggest that the Bike Share System becomes an integral part of the city. The bicycles should function as censors and inform the system about certain behaviours, so that the system can react according to the situation.To predict the performance of a system, the entities have to exchange information. An internet-based platform can analyse the different interests and could then manage possible conflicts. The bicycles are equipped with GPS und W-Lan, so they are connected to each order and can inform the system about their position and status. (Is a bike being used? Where is the bike and where is it moving to? Is there a reservation for the bike? etc.) Privacy protection is a matter that has to be taken into account in the process. To increase the number of commuters travelling by bicycle from 37% to 50% by 2015, approx. 25.000 bicycles have to be integrated into the urban fabric; these bikes will need at least 20.000 m2 of storage space. We see a high risk of overloading the squares, streets and stations of Copenhagen. Therefore, our focus is to reduce the „visual pollution“ wherever possible. At the same time, easy accessibility as well as the system’s visual presence has to be maintained (hide & show policy). The following proposal distinguishes between three different trajectory scales: S,M and L.”

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

New Bike Share System in Copenhagen by RAFAA

more information about the project

The Azahar Group Headquarters, photo by Alejo Bagué

The Barcelona based architectural practice OAB realised the new headquater for Azahar Group, a company whose service is strongly linked to sustainability and environmental issues. The new headquarter should reflect this commitment.

The Azahar Group Headquarters, photo by Alejo Bagué

“With this as a framework, and with the availability of a 5.6-hectare piece of land next to the N-340 highway, part way between Castellón and Benicàssim, the project contemplates three interventions: the covered greenhouses and exterior nursery plantations; a building for services complementary to the activities developed by the company; and the group’s corporate headquarters.

The headquarters is erected as an icon building maintaining a close relationship with the landscape. To both the north and west the topography of the mountains serves as a backdrop to the building, against which the geometrical roofs repeatedly stand out. From a distance their facetted shape and outline help situate the building in the landscape.”

The Azahar Group Headquarters, photo by Alejo Bagué

“Orientated on the east-west axis, the headquarters building is structured as two wings united by a central body around two open patios of a very different sort. The first as a “parade ground” or external reception area for users and visitors, and the rear one, landscaped and for more private use.
In this way it is closed off to the distant landscape and its own climate and interior/exterior rapport established.
These patios provide a cross view between the glazed frontages, and no direct radiation exists towards the interior inhabitable spaces..
The four wings that accommodate the company’s different departments converge in a main hall which, as well as acting as a distributor, is a large exhibition space. The lighting of this hall is overhead, so that the special north light is introduced inside the building through a huge skylight extending over a sequence of girders.”

The Azahar Group Headquarters, photo by Alejo Bagué

The Azahar Group Headquarters, photo by Alejo Bagué

more information about the project @ Architonic


to the OAB profile @ Architonic

'Wood' by Åke Axelsson

'Wood' by Åke Axelsson

With 77 years the Swedish designer Åke Axelsson not even thinks of resigning from work. At this year’s Stockholm Furniture Fair he proudly presented ‘Wood’, his latest piece for the Swedish manufacturer Gärsnäs. The components of this elegant lightweight chair are made with a traditional steaming technique that uses a minimal amount of wood. Wood is packed disassembled in a recyclable cartonboard in order to reduce transport volume.

'Wood' by Åke Axelsson for Gärsnäs

'Wood' by Åke Axelsson for Gärsnäs

more Gärsnäs products @ Architonic

Wed 6.1.

‘Flow2′ by Studio Gorm (US)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 06.01.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

The US designers of Studio Gorm developed this single household kitchen with some smart and sustainable features.

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

Here is what the designers explain:

“‘flow’ is a living kitchen where nature and technology are integrated in a symbiotic relationship, processes flow into one another in a natural cycle, efficiently utilizing energy, waste, water and other natural resources. It provides a space not only for preparing food but an environment that gives a better understanding of how natural processes work. A kitchen where food is grown, stored, cooked and composted to grow more food.”

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

“The ‘flow’ products can be used independently but are far more effective when they work in concert as part of a larger system. The individual objects are relatively uncomplicated, acting as simple vehicles for the more com- plex natural processes to do the work. This kitchen is developed as a flexible system where resources are reused by several elements creating a dynamic flow between the products.”

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

“The hanging dish rack offers vertical storage for drying dishes saving valuable counter space, water from the dish rack drips on the herbs and edible plants, which are grown in the planter boxes positioned below the rack.

Up to 40% of household waste can be composted. kitchen scraps, newspaper, junk mail and paper scraps can be added to the vermicomposter. worms breakdown food and turn it into worm castings, a nutrient rich fertilizer (about 3-6 weeks start to finish). by pulling the handle finished castings are sifted into the collection tray where they can be dried out until needed. the fertilizer can be used in the herb boxes, added to houseplants or the garden.”

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

'Flow2' by Studio Gorm

“The refrigerator is one of the largest consumers of electricity in the home. the majority of the items we refrigerate do not need to be kept as cold as a standard fridge temperatures. The evaporative cooling fridge box keeps food cool through evapotranspiration. The space between the double walls is filled with water which slowly seeps through the outer wall and evaporates, causing the inside temperature to cool. It is ideal for storing vegetables, fruit, eggs, cheese and butter. Evaporative cooling fridge box keeps food cool reducing the need for a larger conventional fridge.”

to the Studio Gorm website

Thu 3.12.

Molded Nature by Beat Karrer (CH)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 03.12.2009 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

Moulding pressed from PLA granulate

Moulding pressed from biodegradable PLA granulate

When half a century ago designers such as Verner Panton and Luigi Colani revolutionised people’s living rooms with their brightly coloured plastic furniture it crossed nobody’s mind that this wonder material that could be formed into any required shape would one day come to become a symbol of global rubbish and the ecological crisis.

Bioplastic made from PLA granulate, at the Vitra Workshop in Boisbuchet

Bioplastic made from PLA granulate, at the Vitra Workshop in Boisbuchet

However, there is hope: for years now international materials producers have been working on sustainable alternatives and they are now ready to launch biologically degradable plastics which can be used for a range of applications. The long-term aim is to create those everyday objects which nowadays consist of countless materials from as few components as possible in order to simplify recycling and accelerate the natural degradation process.

Material studies with biodegradable PLA fleece

Material studies with biodegradable PLA fleece

Just as with ‘normal’ plastics these bio-plastics also consist of countless chains of molecules, the polymers, which in turn are formed from a large quantity of basic components, the monomers. In contrast to synthetic polymers, which are produced from fossil raw materials, the term ‘biopolymers’ refers to the origin of the basic components for the polymers, which come from renewable resources. Biopolymers are composed of materials derived from living organisms – in other words plants, animals or bacteria. These can be starches from potatoes, wheat or maize, cellulose from vegetable cell walls or proteins such as silk, spider’s webs or hair. The properties of the material are determined by the length and molecular structure of the chains. Depending on the manufacturing process and the formulation of the material they can be regulated and optimised by additives such as natural fibres. The variety of bio-plastics which have been tested is already impressive today.

Creating a fruit bowl made from PLA fleece, at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet

Creating a fruit bowl made from PLA fleece, at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet

Creating the material is one thing but finding applications for it is another, because the cost-intensive development of new production materials is only justified by their use in series production. This is where the skills of product designers and manufacturers come in – above all those who are aiming at greater things.
One of these is the Swiss designer Beat Karrer, who together with the biochemist Michael Kangas experiments with new possibilities for processing biopolymers. The low-tech experiments in their Zurich witches’ kitchen produced promising results and these were quickly built on by cooperations with a number of materials producers and a research institute.

Beat Karrer at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet, France

Beat Karrer at the Vitra workshop in Boisbuchet, France

continue article @ Architonic

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Denmark’s first public CO2-neutral building just opened. The new building, Green Lighthouse, designed by the Danish Christensen & Co arkitekter was inaugurated on the 20th October 2009 and serves as an example in several ways. It is the first carbon neutral public building in Denmark consuming 90% less energy than the average Danish university building. 75% of the reduction of the energy consumption is due to the architectural design.

The building has made so much of a stir that it is going to serve as a showcase for sustainable building at the Climate Conference in Copenhagen in December this year.

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

The parties involved in the project are the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, the University of Copenhagen, the City of Copenhagen and the window producers VELUX and VELFAC.

“Green Lighthouse will be used by students at the Faculty of Science. In student services they will be able to get information concerning everything from career guidance to exams and subjects. Furthermore, a faculty club for scientists, and others affiliated with the faculty, will be housed in Green Lighthouse.”

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

“Green Lighthouse’s pivotal point and primary energy source is the sun. The house is 950 m2 and is constructed according to the active house principle, meaning that it generates energy. It has its own energy supply containing a combination of solar energy, heating pumps and a district heating never seen before. Green Lighthouse is an energy-efficient building of high architectural quality, allowing a great amount of daylight to enter. The natural ventilation assures plenty of fresh air and a healthy indoor climate.


Through energy design and visionary architecture, the building’s energy consumption is reduced by around 3/4 compared to present building standards. This means that the building is categorised as a class 1, low energy building according to Danish building regulations (BR 08).”

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

to the Christensen & Co arkitekter website

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