Posts tagged as 'Sustainability'

'Hemp Chair' by Werner Aisslinger, shown in Milan at the Ventura Lambrate during this year's Salone Internazionale del Mobile; photo by Michel Bonvin

The increasing focus on eco-friendly and sustainable products has led to many ingenious and, sometimes, unexpected inventions frequently incorporating state-of-the-art technology. With this in mind, Berlin-based architect and designer Werner Aisslinger has recently designed a ‘Hemp chair’ – ‘world’s first monobloc chair made of natural fibres’.

(more…)

AMF Waste-to-Energy Plant at night. With a light installation by "realities united" the plant's smoke stack are transformed into making it puff smoke rings, serving as a measuring stick of CO2 emission.

Located in an industrial area near the city center the new Waste-to-Energy plant will be an exemplary model in the field of waste management and energy production, as well as an architectural landmark in the cityscape of Copenhagen. The roof of the new Amagerforbraending is turned into a 31.000 m2 ski slope of varying skill levels for the citizens of Copenhagen… (more…)

Cuoio Lounge Chair and footstool designed by EOOS

German manufacturer Walter Knoll’s latest product is the ‘Cuoio Lounge Chair’designed by EOOS. The fact that the chair can be separated into its constituent parts and is recyclable ensures its sustainability. The footstool and the comfort cushion for your back complement the delicate piece. A sheepskin rug thrown over the chair makes it even softer and is another accessory available from Knoll.

Cuoio Lounge Chair with sheepskin rug

'Liga' chair by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

'Liga' chair by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

Elise Gabriel, working in collaboration with TheGreenFactory, has created ‘The Zelfo Embrace’, a collection of furniture that explores the material possibilities of Zelfo, a 100% biodegradable cellulose paste.

'Liga' chair by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

'Liga' chair by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

Funded by VIA, the Paris-based organisation set up to support and promote emerging French designers, Gabriel has designed a chair, trestles and lamps, which illustrate the patented material’s capacities to lend shape to, and to maintain, complex three-dimensional structures that are strong and light.

'Ossos' trestle by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

'Ossos' trestle by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

The patents for Zelfo are owned by Omodo GmbH, Germany, and TheGreenFactory has initiated a Europe-wide R&D programme to industrialise applications of the material, which is made from recycled materials (papers, agricultural wastes) and fast-growing plants (hemp and miscanthus).

'Vélines' lamps by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

'Vélines' lamps by Elise Gabriel & TheGreenFactory

read more about the work of VIA at Architonic

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

The London and Konstanz (Germany) based architects Krausschönberg comleted this affordable prefabricated house in 2007 for a couple with two children in Hamburg. One of the clients requirement was a connected interior space which still offers individual freedom to the occupants.

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

Here is what the architects explain:

“The building is separarted into an upper and a lower part. The upper volume consists of rooms of various heights corresponding to their individual function. Bedrooms, bathrooms, the dressing room and the rooms for the children all require different heights and project into the lower living areas. This common space is organnised by these staggered volumes without being interrupted by partitions.”

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

“Walking around the house takes one through a variety of rooms on the upper level, orientated to the garden as well as to the inner atrium. The walls and the floors of the individual upper rooms are built of sustainable CNC-cut timber panels. These do a variety of things: They consitute the finish; define spaces and functions; help insulate the building; are recyclable; create a comfortable internal environment; and offer a cost-effective building solution.

The lower ground floor is cut into the ground creating direct views into the garden while standing up, or offering a feeling of security while sitting down.”

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

'House W' by Krausschönberg Architects, Photo by Ioana Marinescu

Type: Single family house

Location: Hamburg, Germany

Construction: 4 months

Area: 130 m2

Volume: 600 m3

Heating: Geothermal power

Energy use: 59.8 kwh/m2a

Individuality, community, family – the concept of the 'House W'

Individuality, community, family – the concept of the 'House W'

to the Krausschönberg Architects website

Mon 31.8.

‘M-house’ by Michael Jantzen

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 31.08.2009 - Tagged as: , , , ,

'M-house' by Michael Jantzen

'M-house' by Michael Jantzen

Sustainable architecture, prefabricated housing, CO2- neutral living – all of these are not ideas from the last couple of years, even though the current media attention could create this impression.

The US of the 1960s – admittedly also due to the rising oil prices – was a hub for forward-looking and alternative architecture. Richard Buckminster Fuller, one could call him the guru of ecological thinking at that time, set new standards with inventions such as the geodetic dome – a masterpiece regarding the relationship between material use and constructive strength.

The Los Angeles-based Michael Jantzen, who met Buckminster Fuller as a student in the 1970s, is one of the few of that generation of architects who have stuck to the idea of revolutionising the traditional way of building and offering new architectural solutions in line with the flexible and impermanent life style we practiced long ago.

Inside the 'M-house' by Michael Jantzen

Inside the 'M-house' by Michael Jantzen

The M-house is one of Michael’s most expressive architectural works. Here is how he describes it:

“The M-house consists of a series of rectangular panels that are attached with hinges to an open space frame grid of seven interlocking cubes.The panels are hinged to the cubes in either a horizontal or a vertical orientation. The hinges allow the panels to fold into or out of the cube frames to perform various functions.
Some of the panels are insulated and contain windows and doors. These panels can completely enclose spaces that are heated and cooled. Other uninsulated panels fold in or out, over and around, open platforms to shade the sun, deflect the rain, or block the wind. Some of the panels unfold from the face of the cubes to become places to sit, places to sleep, places to work, or places to eat. Most of the slotted panels are oriented over and around these open platforms.
The platforms and the cube frames, are supported by adjustable legs which are attached to load bearing foot pads. In many cases the support frames do not require a foundation, and they can be adjusted to accommodate terrain variations.”

'M2hhouse' by Michael Jantzen

'M2-house' by Michael Jantzen

All of the M-house components are interchangeable and can be increased or decreased in numbers and size. The panels can be made in a curved configuration and from many different types of materials.
The existing M-house panels are assembled with a steel structural frame which supports thin sheets of a concrete composite. All of the exposed surfaces of the structure are painted.
The M-house was designed to function as a single private vacation retreat, or in multiple numbers and configurations, as a complete stand-alone, high-tech resort complex. The house can be designed to be self sufficient, powered by alternative energy sources such as the sun and the wind.
The M-vironments were developed to accommodate a wide range of markets. With different sizes, shapes, materials, and panel types, the system can be used for exhibit structures, pavilions, play environments for kids, retail spaces, office modules, and many other commercial applications.

Here an example of Michael Jantzen older works:

'Super Insulated Dome Cluster House' by Michael Jantzen, 1981

'Super Insulated Dome Cluster House' by Michael Jantzen, 1981

Inside the 'Super Insulated Dome Cluster House', 1981

Inside the 'Super Insulated Dome Cluster House', 1981

to the Michael Jantzen website

PTW Architects: The Watercube, National Aquatics Centre, Beijing, 2006. Photo: PTW Architects

PTW Architects: The Watercube, National Aquatics Centre, Beijing, 2006. Photo: PTW Architects

A sustainable lifestyle involves consciousness-raising about the relationship between consumption today and the conditions for future generations. Sustainable development requires a balance between mankind’s consumption, the environment and the available resources. Sustainable thinking must be a natural reflex for the architect of the future. The architect works on the basis of a new order where the building as a whole meets the requirements and challenges of a sustainable future. Sustainable architecture incorporates environmentally sound measures and new ‘intelligent’ materials in an aesthetic and social programme.

These are the crucial themes elucidated in the big architectural exhibition at the Louisiana in the summer of 2009.

ECOSISTEMA URBANO, Madrid: Eco Boulevard i Vallecas, Madrid, 2008. Photo: Ecosistema Urbano

ECOSISTEMA URBANO, Madrid: Eco Boulevard i Vallecas, Madrid, 2008. Photo: Ecosistema Urbano

Architecture is facing what is perhaps the greatest new technological and aesthetic departure since modernism. But how is this manifested in down-to-earth as well as more sophisticated projects which together fulfil society’s human and technological visions? And has there been an architectural and artistic response?

Mario Cucinella Architects, Bologna: SIEEB; Beijing, 2006. Photo: Daniele Domenicali

Mario Cucinella Architects, Bologna: SIEEB; Beijing, 2006. Photo: Daniele Domenicali

At present, epoch-making changes are taking place in architecture. New visions, the use of new, different construction materials, alternative structures and revolutionary proposals for the solutions to challenges when it comes to the development of sustainable cities, landscapes and environments, are on the agenda. Concepts like ‘paradigm shift’ have been used – that is, the idea that a new world-picture is emerging, starting in the 21st century. In this world-picture sustainability is a key concept. Louisiana’s exhibition Green Architecture for the Future takes the pulse of the process of transformation that is in full swing, and the exhibition will show some of the complex initiatives and future scenarios that are already being drawn up on the global scale.

 

continue article @ Architonic

Level Green. Photos: Uwe Walter, Berlin

Level Green. Photos: Uwe Walter, Berlin

The Autostadt in Wolfsburg, Germany, launched a new exhibition.

Personal responsibility in the sustainable use of global resources continues to play an increasingly important role in the life of the average consumer. In this context, the offices of J. MAYER H. Architects and Art+Com Berlin were commissioned to develope a permanent exhibition on the topic sustainability for the Autostadt in Wolfsburg, Germany. The exhibition Level Green was opened on the 4th of June 2009 and encompasses approximately 1000 m2, the exhibition renders this highly complex topic tangible, providing for an aesthetic access to information. In so doing, it seeks to unfold the various aspects of the topic while creating an information environment that addresses the visitor on different sensual levels.

The well known PET-sign was taken as a starting point from which the metaphor of the extensively branched web was developed.

The well known PET-sign was taken as a starting point from which the metaphor of the extensively branched web was developed.

Subject to constant re-evaluation based on the latest scientific findings, the term sustainability is characterized by a high degree of complexity. The architectural design of Level Green takes the numerous interdependencies of the topic as a starting point and translates this quality into the metaphor of the web. Similar to a continuous organism, the single elements of the exhibition are connected into one homogenous structure that houses all content and technical installations.

 

read article @ Architonic

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