Posts tagged as 'Suppose design Office'

Passive Solar Design House in Otake, Japan, by Suppose Design Office

Passive Solar Design House in Otake, Japan, by Suppose Design Office

The Otake house is located in the West of Hiroshima prefecture, on a high plateau that neighbors the Kamei Park of the Kamei Castle Ruins. To the South is an industrial region and a beautiful mountain range, and to the North a remarkable view of the Seto Inland Sea and Miyajima. Japanese architects from Suppose Design Office created a design fitting to these two contrasting and beautiful scenes. Structurally they divided the area between load bearing zones and free zones to make a place that could have two personalities at once.

Suppose Design Office created a design fitting to two contrasting and beautiful scenes.

Suppose Design Office created a design fitting to two contrasting and beautiful scenes.

The North side is open even while closed, with the bedrooms, kitchen, dining area, and wide apertures to view the distant scenery, which at the same time are functional as load bearing parts of the structure. Suppose Design Office wanted the South side to be as close as possible to being outside, eliminated some structural elements and designed a living area and terrace with a 6 meter eave, treating the terrace and living area as equal to create a free space with no division between inside and out. By covering the entire building with water proof material used in ship construction the unique and detailed building doesn’t require sealants or tiling. Furthermore, because the glossy, water proof material wraps around the building inside and out uninterrupted, a nature-like space is created where you can take in the outside scenery and the building and surroundings seem to blend together.

Rethinking standard practices in structure, utility, form, materials, interiors, and exteriors.

Rethinking standard practices in structure, utility, form, materials, interiors, and exteriors.

Suppose Design Office mentiones: “By rethinking standard practices and personal opinions about structure, utility, form, materials, interiors, and exteriors, we think we can find new possibilities for materials, the relationship of form and space, and the building and its surroundings, in a planning environment that opens up new wonders not found in traditional buildings. By combining traditional values and new, and breaking down not just the border between inside and out but between the values themselves, we hope to create the buildings of the future.”

 

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Pyramide in Saijo, Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office

Pyramide in Saijo, Hiroshima by Suppose Design Office

In the nine year existence of Japanese Suppose Design Office they have built more than 50 works of architecture, almost all single-family homes. In Saijo, a town known for it sake, a jet black pyramid unexpectedly stands out; when first seen it seems as if it’s a house from the future. On the contrast, it’s actually inspired by the earliest house in Japanese architecture; the pit dwelling or the “tateana jukyo”. Constructed during the Yayoi era (200 B.C. – 250 A.D.), pit dwellings were built by digging a circular pit (or rectangular one with rounded edges) fifty or sixty centimeters deep and five to seven meters in diameter, then covering it with a steep thatched roof.

Inspired by the earliest house in Japanese architecture

Inspired by the earliest house in Japanese architecture

According to Makoto Tanijiri, chief architect of Suppose Design Office, the clients, a young couple and their three children wanted a unique house, in which the open public part would preserve privacy. The site which was formerly an open field was excavated and the house was sunk a meter into the ground. The soil from the excavations was used to create a protective barrier around the perimeter of the site, and acted as the organic base of the house. The barrier formed is both visual and physical and was planted to create a lush landscape.

The soil from the excavations was used to create a protective barrier around the perimeter of the site

The soil from the excavations was used to create a protective barrier around the perimeter of the site

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