Posts tagged as 'shop architecture'

Tue 22.12.

New Camper Store in Malmø / Sweden by TAF (SE)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 22.12.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,


Camper Store by TAK

Camper Store by TAF, photo by Patrik Lindell

The Stockhom based TAF architects realised the new interior for the Camper Store in Malmø in the South of Sweden.

Camper Store by TAF

Camper Store by TAF, photo by Patrik Lindell

Camper Store by TAF

Camper Store by TAF, photo by Patrik Lindell

The stock for the shop is behind the rubber curtain.

Camper Store by TAF

Camper Store by TAF, photo by Patrik Lindell

Camper Store by TAF

Camper Store by TAF, photo by Patrik Lindell

more TAF products @ Architonic

‘Soft Parcel’ by TAF Arkitekter

to the TAF website

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

With the new simplistic interior design for a Stockholm shop of the high fashion brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair, the Swedish practice Guise was nominated for this year’s Great indoors Award, initiated by internationally renowned magazine Frame. Within the same event Guise was awarded Design Firm of the Year 2009.

Interior for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair by Guise

Interior for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair by Guise

Here is what the designers say:

THE PROJECT

“The project concerns a new concept store for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair. The Swedish fashion brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair works with traditional typologies of clothes but deconstructs them and create new hybrid garments. The assignment was to design an entirely new concept store that meets the commercial aspects of a retail space, but foremost to design the spatial encounter with the brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

CONCEPT

The retail concept is based on Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair design methods, but transferred into architecture. Existing architectural typologies have been deformed in order to meet both the functional and the commercial requirements for a store interior. The visual presences of the furniture are designed to be ambivalent; they should resemble a stair although clearly having another purpose.

Jani Kristoffersen, one of the founders of Guise explains: “The ambition was to use strong silhouettes whereupon we choose a double helix-shaped stair as a basic form. In order to adapt the helix shape to meet the functional requirements we had to deform the shape of the stair until it met the commercial need for exposure, but also in order to give it an unique character of its own”.

Andreas Ferm, one of the founders of Guise continues: “Since the main form is folded and rotated it both conceals and exposes the garments and accessories while you move through the store. The rotated shape aims to create a more dynamic experience for the customers, by that we try to create a more well directed spatial experience.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

“The stairs has become the main spatial carriers of the retail concept Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair, but in addition to the stairs a shelving system was designed to meet the flexible needs of the store. The exposure has to adapt to the changing needs of a retail shop. Each shelf is designed and tailored specially for each placement in the store. The shelves consist of a rigorous framework of steel rods, which together create a matrix of small cubic space in the structure, all with dimensions of 360x360x360 mm. By using the cubic dimensions of the structure, the clothes that hung in its bottom exposed in two directions, either along a wall, or by turning 90 degrees to allow for a frontal exposure from a wall.

To the shelf, hundreds of thin black steel plates were designed in order to make the shelf to become rearrangeable by changing the position of the plates. Both the visual aesthetics and the functionality of the shelves are radically changed by shifting the position of the plates.

Not only the furniture has been custom made, but also the cash register, the doll exposure, fitting rooms, doors and the mirrors are special designed to enhance the overall shopping experience.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

to the Guise website

'24 ISSEY MIYAKE' by Nendo

'24 ISSEY MIYAKE' by Nendo, photo by Daici Ano

The Japanese designers of Nendo designed the new concept shops ’24 Issey Miyake’ for different Tokyo department stores.

'24 Issey Miyake' by Nendo

'24 Issey Miyake' by Nendo, photo by Daici Ano

“A new concept shop that offers a brightly coloured selection of items chosen from each of the Issey Miyake lines, alongside new, original items specially created for the shop. Each reasonably-priced item comes in 20 different colours, and the shop’s lineup is renewed every two months. The overall concept derived from the Japanese convenience store, with its constant state of dynamic, fluid change. To highlight this association, the shop’s name is ’24′, and its logo features the kind of stripes you might expect to find on the facade of a convenience store. The packaging, too, comes from food packaging.”

'24 Issey Miyake' by Nendo

'24 Issey Miyake' by Nendo, photo by Daici Ano

” For the shop design, we were inspired by the ‘harmonious chaos’ of Japanese convenience stores. To keep the space as small as possible and fill it to the brink with products, we got rid of the back room storage all of the products are on the shelves at all times. Since the products themselves are so brightly coloured, we used no colour whatsoever for the shop itself. All of the fixtures, including hangers and shelving, are 7mm steel, striped like a shopping basket. The entire shop functions as a display, and the white lines of the steel fixtures give the brightly coloured products a sense of volume. The idea is that as the items change, the shop itself will change character dramatically.”

Shop furniture by Nendo

Shop furniture by Nendo, photo by Masayuki Hayashi

Shop furniture by Nendo

Shop furniture by Nendo, photo by Masayuki Hayashi

to the Nendo website

Livraria da Vila, São Paulo by Isay Weinfeild Architects

Livraria da Vila, São Paulo by Isay Weinfeild Architects

This innovative new bookstore for São Paulo, designed by Isay Weinfeild Architects is one of the entries of this month’s WAN Awards.

“The Livraria da Vila is the result of the refurbishment of a two-story house, built on a very narrow plot in São Paulo. From the start, it was clear to the architects that an open plan was needed, as to better arrange products and circulation. For that reason, significant structural alterations were performed to the existing building, such as the incorporation of metal parts that would make it possible to displace the pillars to the outer sections of the building, and reinforce its foundations.”

Livraria da Vila in Sao Paolo

Livraria da Vila in Sao Paolo

“The inclusion of one extra level, the basement, allowed for the setting up of an entire floor exclusively for children, in addition to a small auditorium to hold courses and lectures.

The shop’s designers believe that in a commercial venue, a project must always be developed to enhance the product, its in-store merchandising, and its sales. There are, undoubtedly, innumerable ways to achieve this goal, and it is probably the nature of the approach that distinguishes each project. Isay Weinfeld Architects, in particular, strive for solutions that will allow customers to experience the product as comfortably as possible.”

Livraria da Vila in São Paulo

Livraria da Vila in São Paulo

more information at World Architecture News

to the Isay Weinfeild Architects website

'K-Space' by 6a Architects

'K-Space' by 6a Architects, photo by David Grandorge

The London-based 6a Architects created this variable interior for the K-Swiss shop in London. Inspired by library archive storage systems the units which are made of perforated polished stainless steel cladding are specifically designed to combine display and storage and slide on tracks to reveal or conceal products.

'K-Space' by 6a Architects

'K-Space' by 6a Architects, photo by Davif Grandorge

“The brief was to produce a retail space that located new and classic K-Swiss products alongside other culturally related objects (CD’s, books…) representing similar brand values. The key function of the space was its ability to transform at a moment’s notice from a working retail space into an open, unbranded space for music or art events.”

'K-Space' by 6a Architects

'K-Space' by 6a Architects, photo by David Grandorge

'K-Space' by 6a Architects

'K-Space' by 6a Architects, photo by David Grandorge

Project name: K-Space London

Client: Paddy Meehan for K-Swiss

Architects: 6a Architects:

Contractor John Perkins Projects

completed summer 2008


to the 6a Architects website

The arched façade correspondig with the existing Label I building

The arched façade correspondig with the existing LABELS I building

The new fashion center, LABELS II BERLIN, designed by HHF Architects is currently under construction and will be opened in October 2009.

The arched façade is a quotation to the exististing, historical neighbouring building and represents also the clear handwriting of the Swiss architects.

The center will be opened in early 2010

The center will be opened in October 2009

Here the architect´s comment:

The fashion center, LABELS II BERLIN, is a concentration of showrooms for international fashion brands in one building, including public spaces such as an event hall, a restaurant and a lounge at the top floor. The design strategy is based on the adjacent warehouse building of LABELS I. The interior spaces of this historical building are strongly characterized by the repetition of arched windows used in the facade and this motif became one of the starting points for the design of the project. The use of two different cut sine curves generates a specific look for both the supporting structure, and in a modified form with sine waves, for the facade. With that, the structure and rhythm is the formative motif for the perception of the completely new building, linking it to the existing neighborhood.

The shop´s inside

The shop´s inside

Connected by a heat exchanging device, the whole concrete structure of the building is permeated with water tubes and used as a radiator for heating as well as for cooling. The energy consumption for heating and cooling of LABELS II BERLIN is reduced by 40% with this combined technique of mass activation and use of the Spree river water.

HHF architects won the international competiton among selected architects in September 2007. The building is now under construction and the opening is planned for early 2010.

The open terrace on the top floor

The open terrace on the top floor

Client
LABELS BERLIN, Berlin

Team
HERLACH HARTMANN FROMMENWILER with Walter Gloor, Yujin Hirase, Cella Hubel, Tonja Kersting, Okhyun Kim

read about the lookout point in Mexico by HHF Architects

to the HHF website