Posts tagged as 'shingles'

Thu 8.4.

’360 House’ by SUBARQUITECTURA (ES)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 08.04.2010 - Tagged as: , , , ,

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

The Spanish architectural practice Subarquitectura recently finished this sculptural sloped single family residence in Galapagar near Madrid. The plan demonstrates the well utilised spaces and the moments of intimacy and community this extraordinary composition offers.

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

Here is what the architects say:

“A unique opportunity for us is in reality a problem that’s been posed thousands of times: to construct a house with a public programme of social relation, associated with the prívate life of a numerous family on a sloping plot of land with privileged views of the mountains outside Madrid. It has not one solution, there are many, they’re even catalogued in books about houses of a slope.
We try not to think of domestic spaces. On the contrary, we take as a point of reference works of engineering, motorway intersections, changes of direction. We proceed from generic solutions to the problem of descending, solutions that conceal great plasticity. We seek the poetic in all that seems to have been considered from the merely pragmatic point of view.
The result is the literal construction of a use diagram. In this instance, form does not follow function, but is instead function itself. Cyclical movement, routine and surprise turn into a way of living.”

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

“Its formal complexity offers the possibility of reaching all points of the house through two different routes, which multiply the possibilities of use and enjoyment. It has the form of a loop, 360º, like the shapes skaters make, like of gymnasts, as artistic as they are precise.
An extreme shape, the house is curved, generating the greatest quantity of linear meters towards the good views. It is shored up in the landscape and turns back on itself, completing the revolution. The degree of intimacy increases as the distance to the ends increases. At the midpoint, a mediatheque, isolated and completely dark, 100 % technology, 0 % landscape.
With a single gesture two ways of moving are generated: going down and looking outwards. The long house, a sinuous movement, a descent by ramp and ample turning radii tangential to the setbacks of the plot of land generate a panoramic vision. The short house, the quick way in a straight line, stairs of direct descent and a deep view towards the landscape.
A building that is black outside, absorbent, of slate, a material specific to the location, imposed as an aesthetic specification of the area. White inside, reflective, generic, neutral, and luminous. Life incorporates colour, outside with the vegetation and inside with the people.”

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

'360 House' by Subarquitectura, photo by David Frutos Ruiz

Plan

to the Subarquitectura profile @ Architonic

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

This church was the master’s thesis of Anssi Lassila, co-founder of the Finnish practice Lassila Hirvilammi Architects. The competition was arranged in 1999 at the University of Oulu’s Department of Architecture. The church is situated where the old church, torn down in 1841, is assumed to have stood, in the middle of fields, by a river. It is modern but hand-built using 18th century methods.

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Here is what the architects explain:

“The basic concept is simple both structurally and functionally. The simple forms owe something both to vernacular wooden churches and bell towers as well as pared-down contemporary architecture. The idea of a modern church built using traditional methods at first seemed not only novel but also problematic, but finally proved enriching to the project. The spirit and appearance of the building is inimitable.”

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The building comprises two parts: the “core” is built of logs and the “cloak” of shingles tarred black on the outside. The solution sought to combine simple, archaic atmosphere and optimal weather resistance. Between the shingle envelope and the log core there remains the service spaces: the vestibule, vestry, and storage rooms. Visitors are lead through a dimly lit space to a light church interior lit from above by lanterns. The building is visually calm, offering a silent haven. When it is dark, the church will be lit by glass lanterns and candles. The pews will not be fixed to allow for a flexible use of space and the altar can also be moved.

Although the church will be small in size, the exceptional building method means that the background research and learning traditional building, as well as inventing some novel solutions, is quite a large undertaking.”

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämaäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämaäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

to the Lassila Hirvilammi Architects website

more architect’s projects @ Architonic

Thu 1.10.

Bahia House in Brazil by Gaetano Pesce

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 01.10.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Italian-born, New York-based designer / artist / architect Gaetano Pesce is known the world over for his unconventional, avant-garde, and imaginative architectural designs. He’s a rule breaker with a passion for color, shape, and state-of-the-art technology, which is evident in his recent architectural phenomenon on the beaches of Bahia, Brazil.

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Pesce’s private vacation home (dubbed Casa do Artista), is visually stimulating and over-the-top, but at the same time, in some ways, economically sensible. The exterior is covered in multi-colored glass and tiles to resemble fish scales, while the interior is constructed from some of the area’s local resources. For example, one of the pavilions is made from rubber, which is locally manufactured, and has been infused with lavender to mask the rubber’s scent. (Can you imagine? Scented architecture!) Interested? These digs are for sale by Sotheby’s Realty, as the designer just doesn’t have the time to jaunt to Brazil as often as he would like.

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia House by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia Hose by Gaetano Pesce

Bahia Hose by Gaetano Pesce

via @ Dezona

Gaetano Pesce products @ Architonic