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Posts tagged as 'School'

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

The Paris based architectural practice Mikou Design Studio realised this school building for the City of Saint-Denis in the north of their hometown.

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

“The school complex of Bailly is situated on a changing territory and is located on the starting point of the reconstruction of the scale of the district. The expression of the project is inspired by this specific context of the material used – glazed brick – and by the idea of the roof which give reference to the lanterns of the cathedrals.

The school complex is aligned on the rue de Bailly like a “building wall” on one level which grows hollow and inflects to form the esplanade for the entrance.”

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

“The esplanade is designed like a space of hospitality, protected and covered by a playful light shelter. Its base of brick is extended in the building by an internal brick street which functions as an interspace area to access both schools, the recreation centre and at the same time serve like the connection area for the various functions.

The body of the building seen from the rue de Bailly shows a glazed screen printed façade to protect the intimacy of the children, giving the possibility for transparency in the interior gardens and under the coloured ceiling.

The classrooms are organised in the north-south transverse on two levels which end on the firewall on the side of the railway. They are structured by horizontal circulations and interior gardens protected by noise by a glass screen.

This configuration makes it possible to limit the façade exposed direct to the noise and to create independent units emphasised by the green transparency for the preschool, the recreational centre and the elementary school which are connected between them by an interior street open towards the forecourt.”

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

“In this constellation, the preschool and the elementary school yard are located sidewards in contrast to the units for the teachers. Placed on the north and south end of the site, they are protected by noise and acoustic screen made up of circular tubes of different densities from the west which also absorb the noise during the recreation.

Each schoolyard is extended visually one level higher by the garden, accessible by a ramp connected from the schoolyard. These gardens, important for the class rooms on the higher levels, bring freshness to the project and enable the children to get fresh air between the lessons and to connect with the schoolyard while walking on the protected and planted way.

The school complex of Bailly is on a site which is under the development of Plaine Commune who want it to be the initiator for the reorganisation for the district along the rue de Bailly.

Being a building on two levels, its roof will be apprehended as a pedestrian scale because of the surrounding high buildings. The roof therefore is designed like a crucial factor of the project; it is the fifth façade seen from the rue de Bailly by the children like a bright coloured pallet, visible from the surrounding high buildings in the shape of thin straps of vegetation cut in the sheds.”

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

Bailly School Complex, photo by Kleinefenn

to the Mikou Design Studio website

more architcture and design projects @ Architonic

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

The Technology College of Barreiro has been awarded the International Architecture Award for the Best New Global Design 2009 by the Chicago Athenaeum, Architect and Design Museum. It has also been shortlisted for ENOR 2009 and FAD 2009, the results of which will be announced in the next couple of months. Located on the outskirts of Lisbon the college was designed by ARX Portugal, the firm lead by brothers Nuno and José Mateus.

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

“The building site assigned for the School is located in the outskirts of the city of Barreiro. These are rural territories which were invaded by recent constructions intersecting green-gardens and reed plots. Residence houses are predominant and other functions were not predicted for this area and so this neighbourhood is now just a suburb with little urban life. The soil, however, is quite interesting: broad, softly inclined and well-related with its shape – unevenness of 13,12 feet in perimeter to north and south – having at one end a dense forest of cork and large pine trees.”

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

“There are some projects that cause a public reaction even before its existence, and there one can find a great deal of important matters to consider. This school is such an example. The inhabitants of this “neighbourhood” protested against its existence because they wanted a primary school instead – which was transferred elsewhere –, but also because they feared the impact a building of large proportions would have, both visually and ecologically. Fearing that the trees would be cut down, they counted and marked every single one.

We aimed at imprinting to the building a somewhat ambiguous character. On one hand it “dissipates” and accepts the prevalence of the natural elements, on the other hand it deals with their presence as an artificial element of abstract origin. This principle is highlighted by the constructive choices: big coal-grey block that, when sectioned, reveals a white interior.

The architecture becomes more topographic in one of the extremities of the building, where there is no way to tell where the surrounding starts or ends, and in the opposite side, with its more present limits, defined by the alignment of the tops of the different bodies of the building.”

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Technology College of Barreiro by ARX Partugal Arquitectos, photo by FG + SG - Fotografia de Arquitectura

Construction: 2005 – 07

Architecture: ARX PORTUGAL, Arquitectos Lda., José Mateus, Nuno Mateus

Project Team: Paulo Rocha, Stefano Riva, Andreia Tomé, Clara Martins, Marco Roque Antunes, Nuno Grancho, Pedro Alves, Pedro Dourado, Pedro Sousa, Tânia Pedro, Francisco Marques, Sónia Luz

Landscape Architecture: GLOBAL, Arquitectura Paisagista Lda.

Structural Engineering: TAL PROJECTO, Projectos, Estudos e Projectos de Engenharia Lda.

Electrical and Telecomunications Planning, Security Planning, Mechanical Planning: AT, Serviços de Engenharia Electrontécnica e Electrónica Lda.

Sanitary Planning: AQUADOMUS, Consultores Lda.

Contractor: Obrecol

Gross Construction Surface: 10 500 m2

to the ARX Portugal Arquitectos website

seen at World Architecture News

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten

Together with the interior architects of i29 the Dutch practice Snelder Architecten realised this interior design for a public school in Amstelveen in the south of Amsterdam.

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Here is what the architects explain:

Architecture and interior
“In the design for the new accommodations of public school Panta Rhei in Amstelveen (NL) there is a lot of attention on the balance between freedom and a sense of security. Snelder Architecten realised a building with many open multifunctional spaces where students can make themselves familiar with the teaching material. The interior design by i29 links up with that perfectly and gives the spaces an identity that connects with the students’ environment and addresses them directly and personally. i29 let itself be inspired by the name of the school. Panta Rhei, meaning ‘everything flows’, ‘everything is in motion’. This led to a design that leaves space for the imagination of the users, offering elements that can be used flexibly, which also propagates the school’s identity.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Poems

“Throughout the entire school poems have been applied to the linoleum floors and the furniture. The thought behind this is that there are moments outside of the classroom when you can learn and gain insights: often a casual setting is very inspiring. Maybe these poems provide a different perspective in an unguarded moment. i29 commissioned the poet Erikjan Harmens for this. He worked out themes like insecurity and friendship together with the students. The open texts leave room for their own interpretation. i29 modelled the poems in ‘carpets of text’ in which the letters stick together and seem to flow from each other. From a distance the texts form intriguing graphic patterns. This imagery has been implemented by i29 in the new school logo, the facade and the signposting throughout the school. The furniture, which was made to measure, is informal and dynamic. Because work takes place both in groups and individually, i29 itself designed tables in asymmetrical, angular shapes. These shapes allow the furniture to be linked together in all kinds of ways and different configurations can be made, such as square, circular or star-shaped set-up. This means the pieces can be used in the general spaces as well as in the classrooms and staff rooms.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Structures
“i29: ‘We think in structures and rhythms and not in taste or style. You can look at it as music which deals with harmony and contrast. One tone is not unconnected to the next and silence is essential.’ i29 has realised a spatial composition which has been carried out without compromise. Over the neutral basis of tables and benches there is a fine fabric of black elements; consisting of the poems, the hassocks and the Magis One-chairs. The furniture is strong and robust, but does not look bulky, rather refined. Remarkable in this context is the choice of the Grcic chair. It matches well here because of its technical aura and it urges you to think about the design and production process. It is a vocational school after all. Just because this is not a university, does not mean you do not have to challenge the students.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

more information @ Arkinetia

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob't Hart

The Dutch architects of MVRDV designed this tribune, a new think tank called ‘‘The Why Factory’’, at the Faculty of Architecture at the Delft University of Technology. The project was awarded with this year’s LAi prize. The flexible furniture are designed by Richard Hutten.

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob't Hart

“After a fire destroyed their premises, The Why Factory and the faculty of architecture of Delft University moved into the former main building of the university. An interior courtyard was created and designated as the new residence of The Why Factory. MVRDV designed the three floor tall wooden structure, containing lecture halls, meeting rooms and the premises of the research institute. An auditorium stair climbs to the top, literally putting the students on top of their teachers.

The structure distinguishes itself by its bright orange colour which clearly identifies The Why Factory as an independent research centre within the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology. Furniture designer Richard Hutten designed flexible furniture to allow the space around the tribune to switch function between research hall, lecture hall and exhibition space.”

The Why Factory by MVRDV

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by TU Delft

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob’t Hart

The Why Factory by MVRDV, photo by Rob’t Hart

Client: TU Delft

Budget: 150.000 Euro (Construction)

Surface: 370m2 Tribune and 195m2 orange floor

Site :950m2

Location: Julianalaan Delft, Netherlands

Projectteam: Winy Maas, Jacob van Rijs and Nathalie de Vries with Anton Wubben, Riccardo Ferrari, Simon Potier, Jonas Klock and Diana Lopez

Engineering: Braaksma&Roos Architectenbureau, Den Haag

Contractor: Meesterbouw BV , Den Haag

Interior: Meesterbouw BV , Den Haag

Furniture: Richard Hutten, Rotterdam, NL

Electrical Installations E.T.A.B. de Vest, Delft

Installations Cofely West Utiliteit BV, Rijswijk

Lighting: Henk van der Geest, Amsterdam, NL

Floor finishes Cem Plaat BV, Enschede

Loose furniture (chairs etc.) Vitra, Ouderkerk aan de Amstel

Construction: ABT

to the MVRDV website

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

The Spanish architects of Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza realised this Day Care Center in Ponzano in the North of Italy. The nursery was built as a joint venture between BENETTON and the local authority to provide much-needed early years learning for a rapidly growing popluation. Up to 100 babies and infants, the children of residents of Ponzano and those of BENETTON employees, will attend the school.

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Here is what the architects explain:

“We built a square box composed of nine smaller squares. The center square emerges to bring light from the heights of the vestibule. The classrooms are arranged in the surrounding squares.

This square structure is inscribed within a larger, circular enclosure made up of double circular walls. Open to the sky, four courtyards are created that suggest the four elements: air, earth, fire and water.”

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

“The space between the perimeter walls serves as a “secret” place for the children. The courtyard spaces, tensed between the curved and the straight walls, are particularly remarkable.

The central space, the highest and with light from above, recalls a hamman in the way it gathers sunlight through nine perforations in the ceiling and three more on each of its four façades.

The children have understood the building well, and a book has even been published of their impressions. They are happy there.”

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Day Care Center by Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza, photo by Hisao Suzuki

Photo by Hisao Suzuki

Photo by Hisao Suzuki

to the Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza website

Museo De La Memoria De Andalucia in Granada / Spain by Alberto Campo Baeza

Sat 14.11.

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 14.11.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

Recently the new Langley Academy in Berkshire / UK, designed by Foster + Partners opened its gates.

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

“With an enclosed full-height atrium at the heart of the three-storey building, the social life of the school revolves around this assembly space for 1,100 students. A recurrent element in several other of Foster + Partners’ academy buildings, the atrium is defined by a sense of transparency and openness – like a gallery of learning – which in this case also resonates with the museum theme. Inside the atrium there are three yellow drums raised above the floor on circular columns. These two-storey pods house the Academy’s ten science laboratories, reinforcing the importance of science teaching. A dedicated sports and culture block contains specialist facilities for music and drama including a fully equipped theatre, a TV and sound recording studio, soundproofed practice rooms and a rehearsal space, sports hall and lecture theatre. The academy’s two light and airy covered streets extend from the atrium and are lined with 38 classrooms.”

 The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

“The environmental features save 20% in water consumption and approximately 150 tonnes of CO2 per year compared to a traditional academy and are used in the teaching of science and environmental issues. Students can see the solar collectors on the roof and the workings of the exposed plant room, as well as the network of pipes that illustrate how energy is generated and carried through the building. Rain water is collected and stored and grey water filtered for reuse in sanitation and irrigation; a system of horizontal louvers provides shade; and the building has been configured to allow out-of-hours use by the wider community, ensuring its sustainability over time. Foster + Partners and Buro Happold collaborated on the environmental design.”

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

Nigel Dancey, a senior partner and design director at Foster + Partners said:
“Environmental performance and appearance are indivisible at The Langley Academy. The school pioneers a revolutionary new educational concept which draws on the theme of museums and galleries, so that the school itself is like an exhibit, with its physical manifestation a showcase and educational tool for environmental design.”

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

The Langley Academy by Foster + Partners

to the Foster + Partners website

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Neckar-Odenwald County entrusted the local Ecker Architkten with the realisation of a new quickly and economical to built Kindergarten for children with physical or developmental handicaps.

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Here is what the architects explain:

“Four repetitive modules form the building. Each of these units contains two group classrooms and a small therapy room. Large roof overhangs shade group rooms in the summer months and allow outdoor play on exterior terraces in poor weather.

The units are radially distributed about an atrium- the largest single space in the school. This flexible meeting room serves as a circulation zone, an indoor playing field, a communal dining hall, and the place where each child begins and ends his or her school day. The size of the atrium also permits joint group activities and celebrations, fulfilling a vital part of the school’s educational mission first thought beyond the budget of the project.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

“This center is naturally illuminated and ventilated by four prominent roof monitors – the so-called ‘jester’s cap’. Opening lower vents in the classroom façade and the window flaps mounted at the top each monitor naturally draws air through the entire building, providing cooling during warmer days or when the atrium is densely populated. The monitors form the visual identity of the kindergarten, which has a strong presence despite sprawling, commercial surroundings. The cladding of these elements in gold-anodized aluminum roofing creates an important point of pride for the children who are schooled here.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

“The entire building was executed in wood frame construction, with glue-laminated timber columns and beams. Connection reveals in the timbers, designed to accept aluminum curtain wall profiles, were milled with a CNC wood router in the carpenter’s shop to ensure precision on the construction site. The nearly identical building modules enabled factory production of large framed panels, resulting in an extremely economical and fast erection – the entire construction period for this building, from groundbreaking to ribbon-cutting, totaled 8 months. Exterior walls are clad with robust clapboards, and wood products play a dominant role in the interior build-out. The color concept reinforces the radial form of the building and assists in the spatial orientation of the young user group.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Technical Information:

Wood frame construction, supporting framework from construction-grade full-timber and glue-laminated timber.

Wall and ceiling insulation with blown-in Loose-fill dry cellulose.

Interior finishes: Visible glue-laminated beams and columns, general wall sufaces are built from OSB (oriented strand-board) and „Fermacell“ (a gypsum and wood-fiber drywalling)- painted. Rubber base at floors. Linoleum flooring is used throughout the building.

Custom built-in cabinetry from MDF with plastic laminate surfacing.

Solid-core doors with opalescent plastic laminate surfacing and solid wood edging.

Stainless steel door hardware – Jasper Morrison’s 1144 Series for FSB.

Custom childrens’ tables are built from solid oak surfaced with desk-top linoleum.

Hung ceilings (interior and exterior) are Heraklith, a Magnesite-cement and wood-fiber acoustic panel.

Exterior Finsihes: Wood Clapboards, painted; the protection of the laminated timber construction on the exterior is provided by Aluminium roof edging and window cladding. The ‘jester’s cap’ is clad with a standing-seam gold-anodized aluminum rain-screen.

The overhangs above every terrace provide the building with an ‚intelligent’ solar shading in the summer months and allow a ‚solar gain’ in the winter.

Ventilation flaps in the aluminium curtain wall façade allow a continuous, controlled stream of fresh air into the building. Excess warmth is ventilated through a ‘thermal chimney’ at the highest point of the building, the ‘jester’s cap’ above the atrium. Even during construction in the hot summer of 2006, the climatic concept produced a comfortable interior environment without the aid of mechanical cooling.

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Client: Neckar-Odenwald County, represented by County Executive Dr. Achim Brötel

Architect and General Contractor: Ecker Architekten

Structural Engineering: Färber + Hollerbach

Environmental Enginnering: Ingenieurbüro Willhaug

Carpentry: Zimmerei Bechtold, Roigheim

to the Ecker Architekten website

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

CO2-neutral: Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Denmark’s first public CO2-neutral building just opened. The new building, Green Lighthouse, designed by the Danish Christensen & Co arkitekter was inaugurated on the 20th October 2009 and serves as an example in several ways. It is the first carbon neutral public building in Denmark consuming 90% less energy than the average Danish university building. 75% of the reduction of the energy consumption is due to the architectural design.

The building has made so much of a stir that it is going to serve as a showcase for sustainable building at the Climate Conference in Copenhagen in December this year.

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter

Green Lighthouse by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

The parties involved in the project are the Danish Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation, the University of Copenhagen, the City of Copenhagen and the window producers VELUX and VELFAC.

“Green Lighthouse will be used by students at the Faculty of Science. In student services they will be able to get information concerning everything from career guidance to exams and subjects. Furthermore, a faculty club for scientists, and others affiliated with the faculty, will be housed in Green Lighthouse.”

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

“Green Lighthouse’s pivotal point and primary energy source is the sun. The house is 950 m2 and is constructed according to the active house principle, meaning that it generates energy. It has its own energy supply containing a combination of solar energy, heating pumps and a district heating never seen before. Green Lighthouse is an energy-efficient building of high architectural quality, allowing a great amount of daylight to enter. The natural ventilation assures plenty of fresh air and a healthy indoor climate.


Through energy design and visionary architecture, the building’s energy consumption is reduced by around 3/4 compared to present building standards. This means that the building is categorised as a class 1, low energy building according to Danish building regulations (BR 08).”

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green House by Christensen & Co arkitekter, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

Green Lighthouse, photo by Adam Mørk

to the Christensen & Co arkitekter website

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