Posts tagged as 'resin'

'Pinus Pinaster' Cheese Cover and Tray by Fabien Barrero-Carsenat

‘Pinus Pinaster’ Cheese Cover and Tray by Fabien Barrero-Carsenat

Fabien Barrero-Carsenat’s ‘Pinus Pinaster’ (aka the Maritime Pine) collection is an exploration of resin. It all started when Barrero-Carsenat was wandering through a pine forest in the south of France and brown droplets of resin shining in the sunlight.

 

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Mon 30.8.

Carbon-fibre seats by Peter Donders (BE)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 30.08.2010 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

'C-Bench' by Peter Donders

The Belgian designer Peter Donders developed these ultra-light seating furniture made from 462 m (pouf) and 320 m (bench) of carbon-fibre under his label morphs. The single string of fibre was twisted around a form that was removed afterwards.


“The resulting structure is airy yet incredibly strong and has been aptly described as ”caligraphy in 3d”. Currently the ultimate material available in terms of weight to strength ratio, carbon fiber is used to produce Formula One racecars, the highest quality sporting equipment, and even the chassis of spacecrafts. This exceptional piece will be offered in a limited edition of 10 pieces.”

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'MOA' Basket-series by Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau

With her sophisticated glass-fibre stool ‘Nido’ Eva Marguerre received the biggest reputation a young designer like her can dream of. Together with Marcel Besau she now launched a new series of baskets which is based on a completely new material combination out of elastic yarn and resin.

'MOA' Basket-series by Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau

“The basic form is built of innumerable crisscross spanned Lycra-yarns where every route is different, leading somewhere from bottom to top or someway from right to left, seemingly without beginning and end. The outcome of this is an interwoven elastic net, that is afterwards drenched in resin and pressed over a suitable form. Thus, the formerly two-dimensional flexible structure is transformed into a three-dimensional form, creating fruit-, newspaper-, and paper-basket which are solidified by hardening of the resin”, the designers explain.

Marcel Besau

Eva Marguerre

'MOA' Basket-series by Eva Marguerre and Marcel Besau

Material: elastic yarn and resin
Basket types: paper-, newspaper-, and fruit-basket
Colors: black, yellow, turquoise, mixed colors
Weight: 440g, 320g, 210g
Waterproof and washable
Baskets of daily use for the residential area


to the Eva Marguerre profile @ Architonic

Thu 22.10.

‘Downside Up’ series by Claire Ferreira

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 22.10.2009 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

'Downside Up' table by Claire Ferreira

'Downside Up' table by Claire Ferreira, photo by Roel Paredaens

The French designer and this year’s graduate from the Royal College of Art Claire Ferreira presented this beautiful series of semi-cast furniture at the London Design Festival.

Three distinct elements create Downside Up Table: a mould, a liquid and a frame.

Claire Ferreira poures Jesmonite – a bio-resin supplied as a water-based acrylic liquid and a mineral powder – inside a wooden base. The resin comes out of four separated slits and forms a smooth flat surface. Poured in different times, a unique pattern appears.

'Downside Up' table by Claire Ferreira

'Downside Up' table by Claire Ferreira, photo by Roel Paredaens

“The exact same quantity of materials is poured in each slot… Except that the setting time finally draws what is going to become a unique tabletop”, the designer explains.

Casting the table top

Casting the table top

Claire Ferreira pouring the liquid resin

Claire Ferreira pouring the liquid resin

“Downside Up Shelf is composed of three separated units, which can also be used as individual side tables.”

'Downside Up' shelf by Claire Ferreira

'Downside Up' shelf by Claire Ferreira, photo by Roel Paredaens

'Downside Up' shelf by Claire Ferreira, photo by Roel Paredaens

'Downside Up' shelf by Claire Ferreira, photo by Roel Paredaens

“Inspired by the impulsive behaviour of turning a bag over in order to find what we are looking for (see Rush Bags), I started to explore the ‘spilling over’ process and its upside down outcome to generate new typologies of products. I place my research ‘in-between’, aiming to create a dialogue between designed elements and less predictable ones, between solid and fluid materials, always trying to go beyond the edges of the object”, Claire Ferreira explains.

to the Claire Ferreira website