Posts tagged as 'public spaces'

The Parco Dora project in Turin, Italy, designed by Latz + Partner Landschaftsarchitekten; photo © Ornella Orlandini

The Parco Dora project in Turin, Italy, designed by Latz + Partner Landschaftsarchitekten; photo © Ornella Orlandini

Urban regeneration reaches soaring heights at the Parco Dora in Turin, Italy, where German landscape-architectural office Latz + Partner have created a park that gives the city’s inhabitants a new public space to encounter and enjoy, while referencing Turin’s proud industrial heritage.

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Miami Beach SoundScape West 8 2011 © Robin Hill for West 8

It could be argued that the pinnacle of urban landscape architecture was reached in seventeenth century France and the French formal gardens of Jacques Boyceau and André Le Nôtre, or in Britain in the nineteenth century, when Joseph Paxton and John Nash were transforming former Royal Hunting grounds into places for Victorian gentry to promenade. Contemporary urban architects and designers are rarely afforded the same amount of space, money and time as their antecedents and are more often tasked with transforming abandoned plots, redundant structures or characterless inner city areas into suitable places for public recreation. Here, Architonic looks at some recent successes that add value to their surroundings by pushing the boundaries of park design. (by Alyn Griffiths)

 

read the ‘Park life: the evolving approach to designing urban public space’ article in full on Architonic

Detail of Burri's Landi bench materialised in Natwood

Wood in the Public Space – an Exciting Challenge: we identify a city based on its buildings, its landscape architecture, and its density – however, it is above all the city furniture that makes a cityscape unique and distinctive.

 

City furniture must have a timeless design, be extremely resistant, and above all must stay beautiful for a long time at minimum maintenance. The life cycle costs of a city infrastructure are an important factor for investment decisions. With wood especially, there may be long-term problems caused by standing water or moss which damages the surface and adversely affects aesthetics, safety and user comfort. This means that life cycle costs could be significantly reduced if these weaknesses could be eliminated without a coating while at the same time substantially increasing durability.

 

read this article in full on Architonic