Posts tagged as 'public space'

The Parco Dora project in Turin, Italy, designed by Latz + Partner Landschaftsarchitekten; photo © Ornella Orlandini

The Parco Dora project in Turin, Italy, designed by Latz + Partner Landschaftsarchitekten; photo © Ornella Orlandini

Urban regeneration reaches soaring heights at the Parco Dora in Turin, Italy, where German landscape-architectural office Latz + Partner have created a park that gives the city’s inhabitants a new public space to encounter and enjoy, while referencing Turin’s proud industrial heritage.

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Selvika National Tourist Route by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter; photo courtesy of the architects

Overlooking the Arctic Ocean and surrounded by the spectacular, coastal scenery of Havøysund, north Norway, this winding concrete structure has been developed by Oslo-based practice Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter. One of the 18 National Tourist Routes in Norway, it was realised ‘to single out and magnify the experience of walking from the roadside down to the seaside at this very special place.’ The striking, serpentine path has been officially inaugurated less than a month ago, on 22 June. (more…)

The Belvedere is the highest point in the Village and features a stibadium where people can gather to take in the views

Among and around the buildings that will house hockey players and hurdlers, cyclists and swimmers throughout the duration of this summer’s Olympic Games in London are public spaces that strive to meet the exacting Olympic standards of excellence and performance, but which have a much more longterm goal. Architonic speaks to Vogt Landscape Limited, the architects behind a public realm project that has been a challenge of speed and endurance, but that they hope is fit for both Olympians and for generations of future inhabitants.

 

read Alyn Griffiths’ ‘Olympic Landscapes’ article in full on Architonic

Roadside Reststop Akkarvikodden by Manthey Kula; photo by Knut Hjeltnes

Set within panoramic and remote surroundings, on a narrow plateau between the mountains and the sea on the Lofoten archipelago in North Norway, this public restroom facility has been realised by the Oslo-based architectural practice Manthey Kula. Located along one of 18 National Tourist Routes in Norway, the austere, copper-coloured development has been designed to ‘shut the [intense, ever-present] scenery out.’ Structurally resembling a small ship, the reststop is made of welded steel plates, locally reinforced with steel flanges while its walls have been clad with glass panels which serve as a protective layer ‘preventing rust from discoloring the clothes of the visitors.’ (more…)

Urban intervention and Miami icon 'The Living Room' by Robert Behar and Rosario Marquardt, 2001

Architonic talks to Miami-based artists Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt about the relation between art and architecture, and how public space has become more contested than ever.
Long before architects were commissioned to sign their names on skylines across the globe, artists were largely responsible for creating local icons. And few of those public artworks have achieved the notoriety of ‘The Living Room’. Created by Robert Behar and Rosario Marquardt, who work under the name R & R Studios, the 2001 installation arguably qualifies as the most widely recognised of their interventions in Miami, their adopted hometown since 1985.

'All Together Now', Denver, by Robert Behar and Rosario Marquardt, 2007

Since then, R & R Studios has continued exploring subjects that ‘The Living Room’ captured so well, such as the scale (and more generally, the attitude) of public monuments, urban life, and the perceived permanence of cities in works like ‘House of Cards’ for the Miami Art Museum and ‘All Together Now’ in downtown Denver. Here, Behar and Marquardt delve deeply into ‘The Living Room’ and discuss how recurring themes in its work reflect the state of American cities as well as the relationship between artistic and architectural practice.


to the interview @ Architonic

Thu 25.6.

Seville doesn´t want Hadid´s library

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 25.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , , ,

Seville University Library, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

Seville University Library, designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

Residents are said to have disapproved of the loss of land surrounding the library including planting. Even though the 250 removed trees and 500 shrubs were transplanted elsewhere in an effort to ensure the trees were not wasted, a ruling has been made by the Andalusian high court against the continuation of works at Seville University Library – the site of Zaha Hadid’s dramatic 9,000 sq m building.

Despite the ruling, construction which is already underway, will continue: “Works continue at the construction site of the University of Seville Library,” said a spokesperson for Zaha Hadid. “Projects such as this library – offering a wide variety of civic, cultural, educational and research programmes – are vital for every community. As the university has outgrown its existing facilities, the new library is essential for the university’s development and reflective of its deep commitment to the future of Seville.

Public prompt ruling against Seville University Library design

Public prompt ruling against Seville University Library design

“The Government of Andalucía, the Seville City Council and the University of Seville will be appealing the ruling. All construction works continue as normal throughout the appeal process,” he added.

Seville University Library designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

Seville University Library designed by Zaha Hadid Architects

more info at World Architecture News

Barriers and seating arrangements on Nørrebrogade

Barriers and seating arrangements on Nørrebrogade

Anyone who has driven through Copenhagen by car, will know how heavy the traffic and how crowded the entrance streets are. The Danish company Møller & Grønborg (M&G) Architects, together with the engineering company COWI, are creating a new plan for Nørrebrogade in Copenhagen. Nørrebrogade is one of the main entrance streets towards the inner city of Copenhagen.

Rearranging the street dimensions by painting the paving surfaces

Rearranging the street dimensions by painting the paving surfaces

The purpose of the project is to strengthen the infrastructural conditions for busses and bicycles and to create a street environment which accommodates city life instead of just extensive car-use.

In search of the right permenant plan for the future development of Nørrebrogade – an experiment was initialised where the infrastructure was restructured. By painting the paving surfaces and thereby rearranging the street dimensions – different traffic models and hierarchies were tested for cars, busses, bicycles and pedestrians in search of a sustainable and realistic solution.

Temporary urban furniture

Temporary urban furniture

There have been produced barriers, seating arrangements and bus stops which work as the urban furniture to come. These installations are all temporary and enable a makeshift setup which can be rearranged not only in real-time but in real-life.

more information at World Architecture News

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