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Posts tagged as 'prefabricated'

'Alligator' in New Orleans by buildingstudio

This affordable home arose out of the post-Katrina re-housing effort in New Orleans for an inner city neighborhood in dour need of new places to live. buildingstudio was working with an affluent client in Boulder, CO who voiced great concern for the lack of effort being made in New Orleans after the storm. As result we asked if they’d be willing to contribute toward an affordable home for a Katrina refugee. Not only did the clients generously give their own money, they invited their friends and colleagues to participate towards the cost of constructing an affordable home. The total sum contributed was $50,000.00. This generous contribution allows Neighborhood Housing Services, who promotes and markets low-cost properties in economically-strapped neighborhoods of New Orleans, to offer the house at a vastly reduced rate. buildingstudio, contributed its full design and coordination services as well.

(more…)

Konrad Wachsmann Aeroplanehangar for the United States Air Force, 1950–1953 Photo: A. Laurenzo, Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich Model: Architekturmuseum der TU München

The Architecture Museum of the Technical University in Munich presents the work and ideas of Konrad Wachsmann in a contemporary context. The German born architect, who emigrated to the USA in 1941, saw prefabricated elements and assembly on site replacing conventional construction methods and created with his book ‘Turning Point of Building’ from 1959 a manifest of that age for the consistent industrialisation of architecture.

The exhibition will be open until 13 June 2010. In conjunction with the exhibition Prof. Matthias Kohler from Gramazio & Kohler, Architektur und Digitale Fabrikation, ETH Zurich, will be speaking on digital production methods on 10 June.

Alexander Graham Bell Tetrahedral-Tower Benin Bhreagh | Canada, 1907 Photo: A. Laurenzo, Die Neue Sammlung – The International Design Museum Munich Model: Architekturmuseum der TU München

“It is only since the use of computerised design and manufacturing methods and the economic production of individually designed elements that industrialisation, prefabrication and modular construction have gained a new, future-orientated meaning since the 1990s. This can be seen, for example, in Foster + Partners’ glass roof at the British Museum, where all parts and intersections are different. A second section of the exhibition looks at the effects brought about by this turning point. Current system building and digital production methods can be explored in a walk-in model and the problems and possibilities found in the manufacturing of a virtually infinite variety of shapes are being highlighted.”

Gramazio & Kohler Architecture and Digital Fabrication, ETH Zurich Pike Loop, Installation in public space Manhattan/New York | USA, 2009 © Gramazio & Kohler, ETH Zurich

Exhibition at Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich

Exhibition at Pinakothek der Moderne in Munich

to the Pinakothek der Moderne website

The Making of Architonic Concept Space II by Gramazio & Kohler

Wed 2.6.

‘Crossbox’ by CG Architectes (FR)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 02.06.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Crossbox' by CG Architectes, photo by Javier Callejas

The Breton practice CG Architectes realised this prefabricated single famly residence in the middle of a rather conventional housing estate in the northwest of France.

'Crossbox' by CG Architectes, photo by Javier Callejas

“This project is a prototype of a Three-dimensional modular and industrialized house, built with four 40’shipping containers. The aim of this project is to build a low cost architect’s housing with high focus on environmental issues. With a industrial approach, the construction time is reduced, as the prices are getting down. Each volume presents a very simple design: living area on the ground floor, and three bedrooms on the first floor. The crossing of the two boxes provides a covered entrance and a carport.
This prototype is the first of the B3 (Built By Boxes) concept by CGARCHITECTES. Soon, many other design will be completed.”

'Crossbox' by CG Architectes, photo by Javier Callejas

'Crossbox' by CG Architectes, photo by Javier Callejas

'Crossbox' by CG Architectes, photo by Javier Callejas

to the CG Architectes profile @ Architonic

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

With his ‘LoftCube’ the Berlin based interior architect and designer Werner Aisslinger introduced an architectural prefabricated add-on for urban spaces. His new ‘Fincube’ builds the equivalent “hideaway-innature” solitaire. Developed with a South Tyrolian team, the ‘Fincube’ was created 1200m above sea level near Bozen in Northern Italy.

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

Sustainable nomadic house
“Made entirely of local wood, the building provides 47 sqm of living space with a minimal CO2 footprint: local suppliers and local crafts using local long-lasting and recyclable materials manufactured with the precision and care of tyrolese handwork. The Fincube is a materialized vision of a small housing unit with a long lifecycle. It can easily be dismantled and rebuilt on a new site, and even more important for nature hideaways: it requires minimum soil sealing – just 2 sqm that are easily renatured after the Fincube is moved to another location.”

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

Long-lasting design
“The design is minimal, material-orientated, and in close touch with nature – the wooden space with a 360-degree triple glazing is furnished with a second facade layer, producing shade and giving the building a unique overall mushroom-like monoshape. The horizontal ledges give privacy to the Fincube and embed the building into forests, meadows, mountain sides or any nature resorts. The combination of long-lasting design and the option of changing its location after a while make the Fincube a flexible home or hideaway and a lifetime companion.”

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

'Fincube' by Studio Aisslinger

more information about the project @ Architonic

to the Studio Aisslinger profile @ Architonic

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

The German practice kadawittfeldarchitektur realised this prefabricated loft – based on a wooden frame construction – on top of an existing single family house in Aachen / Germany in 2007. The gladding is made from larch wood without any kind of paintwork – the silvery gray discoulouration of the wood is specifically desired.

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

Here is what the architects explain:

“Loft L is located in the south of Aachen within a mixed context of detached 1-3 story dwellings and single-family homes. The building extension consists of prefabricated timber framework elements placed on top of an existing house from the late 50s. The specific shape was generated according to zoning constraints existing on site. The extension has generated additional living space, a “parent floor” for a young pair with two children. The project and its construction was featured on local TV, and with its unique shape, selection of materials, and the new “view” created, the building can be seen as a role model for similar rooftop extensions.”

Detail, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

Detail, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

Mounting, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

Mounting, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

Project Management: Dipl.Ing. Daniel Trappen

Location: Aachen (DE)

Construction Volume: GFA 68 m², cubature 190 m³

Realization: 2007

to the kadawittfeldarchitektur website

'Garbungsstädte' in Halle, Germany by Dagmar Schmidt

'Garbungsstädte' in Halle, Germany by Dagmar Schmidt, photo by Ronald Kunze

The large East German prefabricated apartment buildings, known as ‘Plattenbau’ (compound of ‘Platte’ – panel and ‘Bau’ – building) on one hand were a cheap way to solve the country’s housing shortage, on the other hand they corresponded to the political understanding of socialistic living. Even though these apartments were considered highly desirable in GDR, since 1989 decreasing population and modern housing led to high vacancy rates. Many of the apartment buildings, at some places even entire living areas, are being torn down.

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

With her accessible architectural sculpture ‘Grabungsstädte’ (eng.: excavation) the German artist Dagmar Schmidt reminds of a time when these areas were filled with life, and she points to the problems of the changing social space.

She used the walls of one torn down building, the original footprint of six three-room apartments and refurnished them with concrete furniture. Like this Dagmar Schmidt created a beautiful metaphor for the disappearing substance of thousands of people’s homes.

High vacancy rates in the Plattenbau areas of former GDR

High vacancy rates in the Plattenbau areas of former GDR, photo by Gottlob Philipps

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

to the Dagmar Schmidt website

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

The Ljubljana- based OFIS Architects recently unveiled this storage and retail building in their home country Slovenia. A beautiful detail is the colour scheme of the polycarbonate screens, which marks the different functions of the building’s sections.

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Here is what the architects explain:

The site plot is in the industrial area of Skofja Loka, Slovenia. Client bought the site in industrial zone together with constructional permit plans. The building dimensions are 35 x 22.5m and 11,50m in height. Furthermore contract included executive Construction Company for entire industrial zone with their system of prefabricated concrete system with ready made openings on each elevation.

The project task was to merge a program inside the given volume and redefine existing elevations. The existing sections had to remain the same. A client’s company produce and merchandise safety equipment and devices which had to be stored in the 2/3 of the volume. The program was defined and inserted into 4 divisions following functional demands: Offices – storage loading – central storage – storage with attached loading.”

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

The project scheme incorporated storage for goods of different sizes with loading areas, store, offices and classroom for lectures of safety.

The elevation cuts break the functional façade grid and reinstate flowing concrete elements in between translucent screens; Offices with transparent double-glazed façade, storage spaces with semi-translucent polycarbonate elements and two openings on the back as loading dock doors.

Materials are polished concrete, glass, metal and polycarbonate plates.”

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Project leaders: Rok Oman, Spela Videcnik

Project team: Andrej Gregoric, Katja Aljaz, Janez Martincic, Magdalena Lacka

Location: Trata, Skofja Loka, Slovenia
Type: storage
Client: private
Site Area: 2500
m2
Bldg. Area: 780m2
Gross Floor Area: 1.080m2

Structure: reinforced concrete – prefabricated

Budget: 180.000 EUR

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Office, Store & Shop Concrete Container by OFIS, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Farewell Chapel in Krasnja / Slovenia by OFIS Arhitekti

to the OFIS website

Taliesin Mod.FabTM, 600-square-foot prototype

Taliesin Mod.FabTM, 600-square-foot prototype

The Taliesin Mod.FabTM is an example of simple, elegant, and sustainable living in the desert. The one-bedroom, 600-square-foot prototype residence relies on panelized construction to allow for speed and economy on site or in a factory. It can be connected to utilities or be “unplugged,” relying on low-consumption fixtures, rainwater harvesting, greywater re-use, natural ventilation, solar orientation, and photovoltaics to reduce energy and water use. The structure is dimensioned and engineered to be transportable via roadway.

Taliesin Mod.FabTM designed and built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Taliesin Mod.FabTM designed and built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The Taliesin Mod.FabTM was designed and built by graduate and undergraduate students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture with the faculty guidance of Michael P. Johnson and Jennifer Siegal, project manager Christian Butler, recent M.Arch graduate, and assistant project manager Nick Mancusi, current BAS student.

One bedroom prefabricated house

One bedroom prefabricated house

Taliesin Mod.FabTM by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Taliesin Mod.FabTM by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Student participants in design and construction (alphabetical): Dakotah Apostolou, Ebbie Azimi, Thai Blackburn, Christian Butler, Jillian Brooks, Emil Crystal, Michael DesBarres, Daniel Dillow, Dave Frazee, Jeff Graham, Ryan Hewson, Erik Krautbauer, Nick Mancusi, Marietta Pagkalou, Lauren Rybinski, Andrea Tejada, Maya Ward-Karet, Hui Ee Wong, Todd Lehmenkuler, Russell Mahoney, Simon DeAguerro, Taryn Seymour

seen @ Arkinetia

to the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture