Posts tagged as 'prefabricated'

Y:Cube by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, photo: Grant Smith

Y:Cube by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, photo: Grant Smith

Located in Clay Avenue in Mitcham, south west London, Y:Cube is an off-site manufactured housing project for single people in housing need. Created for the YMCA, the world’s oldest and largest youth charity, the 36-apartment affordable accommodation scheme was designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners.

 

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Sun 27.9.

Gimme Shelter

Posted by Walter Phillips on 27.09.2015 - Tagged as:

Off-site, but not out of mind: Brooklyn-based Garrison Architects' prototype for factory-built post-disaster emergency housing for the New York City is designed with modularity, and thereby flexibility, at its core; photo: Andrew Rugge/archphoto

Off-site, but not out of mind: Brooklyn-based Garrison Architects’ prototype for factory-built post-disaster emergency housing for the New York City is designed with modularity, and thereby flexibility, at its core; photo: Andrew Rugge/archphoto

Conflict, natural disasters, endemic housing shortages. Architects and designers around the globe respond to humanitarian and social crises with a range of smart, prefabricated solutions. (by Simon Keane-Cowell)

 

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Villa préfabriqué in Collonges by Pierre-Alain Dupraz; photo courtesy of the architect

Geneva-based architectural practice Pierre-Alain Dupraz have recently realised this single family residence overlooking the Salève mountain. Composed of prefabricated concrete modules stacked atop of each other to form the minimalist residence, ‘Villa préfabriqué’ was completed earlier this year. (more…)

Tue 24.7.

Prefabricated Architecture

Posted by Malgorzata Stankiewicz on 24.07.2012 - Tagged as: , , , ,

A pile of prefabricated concrete beams form the structure of Antón García- Abril’s Hemeroscopium house Antón García- Abril 2008 Photo: courtesy Ensamble Studio

When architects such as Jean Prouvé and Charles Eames began experimenting with buildings made using off-the-shelf components following the second World War, little did they know that technology would one day allow buildings to be created from kits cut by a computer anywhere in the world. Architonic looks at some of the more radical examples of contemporary prefabricated architecture, and the materials and technologies making these possible. (by Alyn Griffiths)

 

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Haus Bold by Thomas Bendel Architekt; photo by Ludger Paffrath

Boasting picturesque views of lush green fields, this rather austere detached house has been developed by a Berlin-based architect Thomas Bendel. Made of precast concrete and featuring a minimalist, glass-and-aluminium façade, the two-storey building comprises a workshop and storage and sanitary facilities which are located on the first floor of the development while the living space in form of two apartments as well as two further office spaces are located on the upmost floor. (more…)

Bayside Marina Hotel by Yasutaka Yoshimura Architects, photo by Yasutaka Yoshimura

The Tokyo based architectural practice of Yasutaka Yoshimura designed this prefabricated hotel on the bayside of Yokohama. The long and narrow containers – fabricated in Thailand and assembled in Japan – are randomly placed and offer each guest room a unique sea view.

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'One+' by Add-A-Room

Lars Frank Nielsen architect and founder of the Danish practice ONEN Design has designed this modular architectural system for the Swedish company Add-A-Room. The houses can be ordered in different modules with specific functions and be composed according to the user’s requirements. They are prefabricated in Sweden in collaboration with mainly Scandinavian companies and with the use of local materials.

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'The Fab Lab House', photo by Adrià Goula

‘Peanut house’, ‘cinnamon submarine, ‘forest zeppelin’ or ‘whale belly’, there have been many names for the sculptural contribution of the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) at this year’s Solar Decathlon Europe. The prefabricated wooden construction which carries some significant technological innovations such as the world’s most efficient flexible solar panels won the people’s choice award. The project, which involved architects and experts from 20 countries, is being developed in cooperation with The Center for Bits and Atoms from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the worldwide network of Fab Labs.

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