Posts tagged as 'plywood'

Wed 14.4.

Novelties by Zilio A&C (IT)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 14.04.2010 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

Rinne chair by Mikko Laakkonen and XY by Tomoko Azumi for Zilio A&C

The North Italian manufacturer Zilio A&C presents a range of new products at this year`s Salone del Mobile in Milan. Mikko Laakkonen, who in 2009 was awarded “Young Designer of the Year”, has designed the Rinne (slope in Finnish) small armchair, successfully merging Nordic minimalism and comfort. Tomoko Azumi adds to her Zilio A&C portfolio several new pieces: the XY small table, a neat combination of metal, wood and glass coming in two heights, the Arc beech wood stackable chair, the Dove paper basket, composed of a single plywood sheet.

Muku bench by Takashi Kirimoto

Arc by Tomoko Azumi

Rinne by Mikko Laakkonen

Dove by Tomoko Azumi

more Zilio A&C products @ Architonic

Prototypes of the new Wogg50 Chair by Jörg Boner for Wogg

Convincing use of forms meets state-of-the-art processing. The result is a chair of the latest generation.
Light, stackable and multifunctional. Wogg 50 will be presented for the first time at this year’s furniture show in Milan. Here you see some exclusiv impressions of a range of prototypes.

Prototypes of the new Wogg50 chair by Jörg Boner

Prototype of the new Wogg50 chair by Jörg Boner

The chair’s design is simple and clear. The seat is bent down on four sides and holds the legs and the back on both outer sides. Molded plywood shapes the aesthetics of the chair. Pressing plywood into shape is an old technique that has seen a rapid development with the introduction of CNC milling technology in recent years. Complex molded parts can be inserted in milling tools and pressed directly with the plywood. This has opened new paths for shape and design. As with the chair Wogg 50, whose structural center is the core pressed in below the seat shell.

Patterns of the new Wogg50 chair by Jörg Boner

to the Jörg Boner profile @ Architonic


to the Wogg collection @ Architonic


to the article about Jörg Boner @ Architonic

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

Kengo Kuma Associates realised this renovation of the Hoshakuji Station north of Tokyo. Parts of the station are made from re-used Oya stone which was left over from an old warehouse that existed in this area.

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

Here is what Kengo Kuma himself has to say:

“The starting point was to open the east exit of Hoshakuji Station. We aimed at connecting the west and east sides of the station, which had been divided by the railroad. It eventually meant the link between the west and the east of the town of Takanezawa, and between the station and Chokkura Plaza & Shelters, which we designed in the east exit area. It is not a design of a station as a box, but is as an aperture. The aperture starts at its ‘neighbor’, Chokkura Plaza. We first decided to preserve the old warehouse of Oya stone that had existed in the area. Then we took advantage of pores in Oya stone, and used them in the new structural system, in which steel frame and Oya stone are combined diagonally, and added the system to the warehouse. Following the design of this ‘neighbor’, we extended this diagonal skin to the other ‘pore’ or ‘aperture’, which is the station. By such extension and connection, we attempted to link not only the station’s west exit and east exit, but also the station and its location.
In order to reduce the weight, we used lauan-made plywood for structure, instead of Oya stone. By using wood, I wanted to revive the humane and warm atmosphere once any station building used to have. The touch of this station building would be conveyed further to the landscape of paddy fields and wooden houses in the town of Takanezawa.
Our emphasis was that by creating ‘pores’, things could be pulled together and restore the community that had been long fragmented.”

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

Hoshakuji Station by Kengo Kuma & Associates

to the Kengo Kuma & Associates profile @ Architonic


read also: ‘The power of the empty space’

'Alle' chair by Luca Nichetto for Skitsch

Luca Nichetto’s new chair design for Italian manufacturer Skitsch will be launched at next month’s Milan Furniture Fair. Called ‘Alle’, it combines a tubular-steel structure with a curved plywood seat element, with a clever use of a colour gradation on the latter integrating the two.

'Alle' chair by Luca Nichetto for Skitsch

There are two versions of the chair: one is four-legged, the other has a column base. Skitsch’s new London store on the Brompton Road, which opens at the end of March, will preview the piece before its official launch in Italy.

'Alle' chair by Luca Nichetto for Skitsch

'Alle' chair by Luca Nichetto for Skitsch

to Luca Nichetto’s work on Architonic

to the Skitsch website

'RAY' stool by Elisa Honkanen

'RAY' stool by Elisa Honkanen

After making work experience at Lissoni Associati in Milan and Patrick Norguet’s Studio in Paris, the Finnish designer Elisa Honkanen opened her own practice in 2008. At the Greenhouse in Stockholm she recently presented her newest creations.

'REST' stool by Elisa Honkanen

'REST' stool by Elisa Honkanen

'TOMERA' table by Elisa Honkanen

'TOMERA' table by Elisa Honkanen

to the Elisa Honkanen website

'Ombra Tokyo' stacked

'Ombra Tokyo' stacked

At this year’s imm cologne the Italian manufacturer presented the comprehensive re-edition of several Charlotte Perriand pieces for the first time to international public. Among them the ‘Ombra Tokyo’ chair from 1954. The lightweight and stackable chair is developed from a single die-pressed piece of curved ply. It was designed for in Japan for the ‘Synthèse des Arts’ exhibition (Le Corbusier, Férnand Léger, Charlotte Perriand).

'Ombra Tokyo' re-edited by Cassina

'Ombra Tokyo' re-edited by Cassina

'Ombra Tokyo' re-edited by Cassina

'Ombra Tokyo' re-edited by Cassina

more Cassina products @ Architonic

Wed 13.1.

‘Berta’ chair by Alexander Gufler (AT)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 13.01.2010 - Tagged as: , , , ,

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

The Austrian designer Alexander Gufler created this multi purpose chair made from a solid wood frame and plywood seat shells.

“In this shell chair the legs are held directly by the seat- and back shell. In combination with the substructure this parts become a stable unit. The intersection of the shells and legs results also into the armrest. The chair impresses with its easy-held outside and comfortable seating. Another focus has been laid on a low and good manufacturability.”

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

'Berta' by Alexander Gufler

seen at The Contemporist

to the Alexander Gufler website

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

The US practice The Office For Lost Objects designed this sculptural and promising table lamp. It is made from a light, high-grade birch plywood structure and a textile, heat-shrink polyester membrane. Multiple layers create different grades of translucency when the lamp is turned on.

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

'Lighting appliance no. 9' by The Office For Lost Objects

seen at Dagens Design

to The Office For Lost Objects website