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Posts tagged as 'pavilion'

'Pavilion 21 MINI Opera Space' by Coop Himmelb(l)au, photo by Christian Schittich, München

The eye-catching temporary pavilion for the Bavarian State Opera in Munich was designed by the Austrian architectural practice Coop Himmelb(l)au. Its radical facade is made from perforated and close aluminium sheet. Due to the peaked structure it absorbs the sound of the passing traffic and sets a strong contrast to the neo-classical principal building of the opera. The pavilion was designed for this year’s Opera Festival which goes on until 31 July 2010.

(more…)

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, photo by Bas Prinsen

It seems like an architectural path, which enables the visitor to discover the interplay of public and private space – the well-branched wooden pavilion was the contribution of the Dutch architect Anne Holtrup for the exhibition ‘Unknown Territory’ at Museum De Paviljoens in Almere, Netherlands in 2009. It is located on the trail created by years of foot traffic. The architect used this intuitive map for his temporary architecture and accentuated the undesigned use of landscape.

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, photo by Bas Prinsen

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, photo by Bas Prinsen

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, photo by Bas Prinsen

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, photo by Bas Prinsen

'Trail House' by Anne Holtrup, plan

to the Anne Holtrup website

Mon 10.5.

Denmark’s EXPO-Pavilion in Shanghai by BIG (DK)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.05.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

She has been beheaded, painted and blown up, but this time it was not some troublemakers who kidnapped the original Little Mermaid, Copenhagen’s beloved landmark, from her rock. From May til October visitors of the World EXPO in Shanghai will be able to see her elegantly sitting in Denmark’s pavilion designed by Bjarke Ingels Group.

The actual attraction though is the conceptual background of the pavilion. Denmark donated 1001 bikes to the city of Shanghai in order to focus on an ecological urban development of the world’s fast growing mega-cities.

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

“We weren’t really finding an obvious hook for our pavilion until we started looking at the recent urban development of Shanghai and Copenhagen. This is a photo of Shanghai from 30 years ago: broad boulevards jam packed with bicycles. Only 2 kinds of cars in Shanghai back then: Shanghai no 1 and Shanghai no 2.

With the massive economic boom and urban explosion everybody wants a car, the streets are congested with traffic jams, and the bicycle has even become forbidden in some parts of town.

In the same period of time, Copenhagen has been creating more bicycle lanes and reducing car traffic. The bicycle has become a symbol of a sustainable city and a healthy lifestyle.

We have developed multiple species of bikes to move not only ourselves but our kids and our stuff around as well.

We even have a so-called City Bike that visitors can borrow for free and move around town before they return.

We thought: Why don’t we relaunch the bicycle as something attractive in Shanghai. We’ll donate 1001 City Bikes to Shanghai that they can keep after the Expo.” BIG explains.

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

“The pavilion is designed as a traffic loop created by the motion of city bikes and pedestrians tied in a knot. Over 300 free city bikes located upon the roofscape, offer the visitors a chance to experience the Danish urban lifestyle which includes biking everywhere. The loops are connected in two places. Coming from the inside, the visitors can move out onto the roof, pick up a bike and re‐visit the exhibition by bike as the outdoor cycle path slips into the interior and runs along the entire exhibition before exiting onto the EXPO grounds. The sequence of events at the exhibition takes place between two parallel facades – the internal and external. The internal is closed and contains different functions of the pavilion. The width varies and is defined by the programme of the inner space. The pavilion’s external façade is made of perforated steel. In the evening time, the façade becomes a sequenced instrument of interactive light illuminating the passers‐by.”

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Hanne Hvattun

“The pavilion is a monolithic structure in white painted steel which keeps it cool during the Shanghai summer sun due to its heat‐reflecting characteristics. The roof is covered with a light blue surfacing texture, known from Danish cycle paths. Inside, the floor is covered with light epoxy and also features the blue cycle path where the bikes pass through the building. The steel of the facade is perforated in a pattern that reflects the actual structural stresses that the pavilion is experiencing making it a 1:1 stress test. The blue cycle path and white concrete surfaces will further define the arrival and exit areas.”

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

PS: By the way, while the mermaid is in Shanghai her place in Copenhagen will be replaced by Ai Wei Wei’s multimedia artwork, including a live broadcast of the statue in Shanghai.


to the BIG profile @ Architonic

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

The Madrid based Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza realised this light and open pavilion in order to cover and protect an archeological excavation at of the most significant location in the history of Cadiz, the oldest city of the Western World.

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

Here is what the architect explains:

“Additionally, we would like this covering plane to serve as the base for a public area facing the sea, at a height that provides a clear view, so the cars on the access highway cannot be seen. It is conceived as a light white platform, perched over the excavation, as if on tiptoes, and is reached by a side ramp. On this plane, light holes will be opened, as skylights, so that the excavation can be seen from above. Above, in the back, covering the current party wall, a stone face to provide continuity to the stone façades of the two cathedrals, an awning is constructed to protect us from the rain and sun”

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

“The entirety is built with light elements, perhaps metal, as if in shipbuilding, all painted white to accentuate its lightness. The passable area will be carpeted in white marble.

The construction of the base recollects ships. The awning above, as if a canopy on poles, recollects a religious procession.We wish to make a beautiful piece of architecture, capable of revealing this marvelous place to its best advantage, capable of remaining in the memory of Cádiz.”

(Alberto Campo Baeza, architect)

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

'Between Cathedrals', photo by Javier Callejas

Project period: 2006- 2009

Surface: 1000 m2

Architect: Alberto Campo Baeza

Collaborating architects: Ignacio Aguirre López, Emilio Delgado Martos

Structure: Andrés Rubio Morán, Jorge Conde Conde – IDEEE

Construction Manager: Manuel Cebada Orrequia

Costs: 1.475.000 €

Constructor: GEOCISA


to the Estudio Arquitectura Campo Baeza profile @ Architonic

Regent's Place Pavilion, London, by Carmody Groarke; photography by Luke Hayes

A new pavilion by UK architectural practice Carmody Groarke has opened in Regent’s Place, London. The structure is the result of a competition that the Architecture Foundation ran in 2007.

Regent's Place Pavilion, London, by Carmody Groarke; photography by Luke Hayes

The competition brief called for a new pavilion at the Osnaburgh Street entrance to Regent’s Place ‘that enriches and activates the public open space at street level’. The winning design consists of a field of 8-metre-high slender columns, supporting a canopy.

Regent's Place Pavilion, London, by Carmody Groarke; photography by Luke Hayes

Created in collaboration with engineers Arup, the pavilion sits in dialogue with the public colonnades that flank each side of the street. Bespoke LED lighting is set into the pattern of the cobbled surface between the columns to uplight the pavilion’s canopy.

Regent's Place Pavilion, London, by Carmody Groarke; photography by Luke Hayes

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

At this year’s Coachella Valley Music & Arts Festival the Los Angeles based practice Ball-Nogues Studio developed this flexible structure on collaboration with students from the Southern California Institute of Architecture.

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

Here is what the architects explain:

“The Elastic Plastic Sponge was created by students from the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) led by Benjamin Ball, Gaston Nogues and Andrew Lyon of the Ball-Nogues Studio. The Elastic Plastic Sponge is a large scale installation and can be twisted, arched and curled to form different types of space including a lounge, a theater, or a large sculptural Mobius strip. In the desert heat of Indio, the architectural installation will provide a respite from the sun by making shade and mist while at night, each “cell” within the Elastic Plastic Sponge supports a fluorescent tube–the tubes shift in orientation relative to each other to create the effect of sweeping motion. The motion effect is evident from close-up as well as impactful from across the vast festival grounds–an important asset in an environment of throngs of festival-goers and competing spectacles.”

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

“The Elastic Plastic Sponge is a unique structure. In architecture terminology, the phrase that describes a system whose form is derived from its material properties is “form active.” These types of structures are difficult to study using software. They often require architects to explore their designs by testing full-scale mock-ups, and using that empirical information to help inform the process of digital modeling, which is studied in the studio rather than in the field.

The Elastic Plastic Sponge is comprised of 250 cells, each fabricated using custom jigs designed by SCI-Arc students. The cell module is a very effective way of constructing a temporary structure: each can be transported as a flat unit to the Festival and rapidly assembled on site; after the Festival is over, dismantling and transportation to a new site is easy.”

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

“From the Festival’s standpoint of an event spanning several days, the Elastic Plastic Sponge can be rapidly reconfigured to create unique spatial arrangements each day; its flexibility allows the designers to adapt to changing crowd, climate and site conditions. From a pedagogical standpoint, the Elastic Plastic Sponge’s mutability enabled students to examine its unique structure at full scale; working and reworking its shape as they would a digital model.”

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

'Elastic Plastic Sponge'

Project Team: Joanne Angeles, Benjamin Ball, Phil Blaine, Seyoung Choi, Dina Giordano, Benlloyd Goldstein, Monica Gutierrez, James Jones, William Kim, Anthony Lagunay, Andrew Lyon, Jorge Miranda, Jeffery Morrical, Gaston Nogues, Mandana Ozlati, Tim Peeters

to the Ball-Nogues Studio website

The shadow structures by Ball-Nogues Studio

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The international architects Marco Casagrande, Hsieh Ying-chun and Roan Ching-yueh are the WEAK! During this year’s Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecturecreated they created this bamboo pavilion, which offers a stage, fireplace and shade.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Here is what the WEAK! explains:

“The building is realized on a wasteland of a ruined building site in-between the Shenzhen City Hall and an illegal workers camp. The design is inspired by insects. The bamboo construction methods are based on local knowledge from rural Guanxi brought into the city by the migrating construction workers.

The space is used during the SZHK Biennale for underground bands, poetry reading, discussions, karaoke and as a lounge for the illegal workers from the neighboring camp. The building offers a shade, a stage and a fireplace. After the Biennale the Bug Dome will act as an un-official social club for illegal workers from the Chinese countryside.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

“The building is weak, flexible and improvised to meet the site-specific conditions. It is growing from a ruin. The architectural control has been given up in order to let the nature step in. The weak architecture is a mediator between the human nature and nature. The construction is a result of participatory planning between the designers, construction workers and local knowledge.

The cocoon is a weak retreat for the modern man to escape from the strength of the exploding urbanism in the heart of Shenzhen. It is a shelter to protect the industrial insects from the elements of un-nature.

When the fire is up a society is born again. One has to take the liberty to travel a thousand years back in order to realize that the things are the same.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The SZHK Biennale started on Sunday 6 December and continues until 23 January 2010.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Architects: Hsieh Ying-chun, Marco Casagrande , Roan Ching-yueh

Construction Work: Chen, Jiang Zhou, Leo Cheng, Marco Casagrande, Nikita Wu, Shao Lei, Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Design Assistant: Frank Chen

Local Knowledge: Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Location: Shenzhen, China

Site: 3000 m2 waste land, ruined building site

Building footprint: 120 m2

Materials: bamboo, wood, gravel, recycled concrete

Completed: 2009

to the Bug Dome blog

biothing exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris

biothing exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris

With ‘biothing’ the New York based architect Alisa Andrasek founded a trans-disciplinary lobratory that focuses on the generative potential of computational systems for design. Her major intrest is the analysis of self organising and adaptive systems, which can become manifest in different scales.

biothing at the Centre Pompidou in Paris

biothing at the Centre Pompidou in Paris

Different biothing works are currently showcased within the ‘Elle’ exhibition at the Centre Pompidou and in a solo exhibition at the FRAC-Center in Orléans.

'Seroussi Pavilion' by biothing

'Seroussi Pavilion' by biothing

“For the Seroussi Pavilion we looked into self-modifying patterns of vector fields based on behaviors of electro-magnetic fields (EMF). The logics of attraction/repulsion were computed in plan and than “lifted” via series of structural micro-arching sections through different frequencies of the sine function. Additional feature built into our script allows for local adaptation to the site in regards to the section – given that the pavilion is implanted into a quite steep hill EMF trajectories needed to “find the ground”.”

'Seroussi Pavilion' by biothing

'Seroussi Pavilion' by biothing

Andrasek graduated from the University of Zagreb, and holds a Masters in Advanced Architectural Design from Columbia University. She has taught architecture studios and theory seminars at Columbia University, the University of Pennsylvania, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Pratt Institute, and has lectured at architecture schools in the U.S. and internationally. Andrasek was co-winner of the Metropolis Next Generation Design Competition, 2005 and received the FEIDAD Design Merit Award, 2004.

'a_maze' by biothing

'a_maze' by biothing

'Orbita' series by biothing

'Orbita' series by biothing

to the biothing website

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