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Posts tagged as 'museum'

Visitor Center Grube Messel by Holzer Kobler Architekturen, photo by Jan Bitter

For almost 100 years oil shale was mined in the Messel Pit near Darmstadt in central Germany. Here very well preserved fossils were found again and again in the course of mining operations. After the mine was closed in 1971 it turned – due to the great number of fossils that it contains – into an archaeological excavation and was placed under UNESCO protection as a World Heritage Site. The Zurich based practice Holzer Kobler Architekturen recently completed the scenography and interior design for the Visitors Center of the exhibition.

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Interior design of Information Centre, Zuiderzeemuseum, Enkhuizen, The Netherlands by Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters

According to the Dutch penchant to connect traditional aesthetics with modern issues the Zuiderzeemuseum in Enkhuizen showcases masterpieces and objects of an enormous historical variety – from old impressive Dutch paintings to the artistic objects of Victor & Rolf.

In 2009 the Zuiderzeemuseum invited the Eindhoven based designers Maarten Kolk & Guus Kusters to design the interior for the information centre of the museum park.

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Svalbard Science Centre 78°north by Jarmund / Vigsnæs AS Architects MNAL, photo by Nils Petter Dale / nispe@datho.no

This extension of an existing university and research building in Svalbard (Spitzbergen), in the very north of Norway was realised by the Oslo based Jarmund / Vigsnæs AS Architects MNAL. The construction which also provides new facilities for the Svalbard Museum is characterised by a faceted insulated copper-clad skin. Its shape is the result of climatic 3D simulations which have been undertaken in order to assure that the accumulation of snow would not create undesired conditions in front of doors and windows.

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Museum of Memory and Human Rights, photo by Cristobal Palma

The Brazilian architectural practice Estudio America realised the new building of the Museum of Memory and Human Rights in Santiago de Chile. The competition was arranged by the Chilean Ministry of Public Works, Dirección de Arquitectura, Comisión Presidencial de los Derechos Humanos. The monolithic building is based on two major elements: the Exposition Beam and the Base. The first, elevated and airy, forms the exhibition space of the museum. The other, the Base, in a first step deep as a mine, where the study, the production, the invention, the seminars, the knowledge of the land and the territory are located.

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The Dornier Museum, photo by Brigida Gonzales

The Stuttgart based architectural practice Allmann Sattler Wappner realised the Dornier Museum in Friedrichshafen, situated in connection to Friedrichshafen Airport. The museum documents airspace history and the tradition of the German aircraft manufacturer Dornier Corporation.

The Dornier Museum, photo by Jens Passoth

“The simultaneity of museum and airport, past and present in one location manifests itself within a bow-shaped runway, resembling an exit in proximity to the southern airstrip. At its apex, it is superimposed with a rectangular volume. The geometric intersection area is the basis for the museum floorplan The exhibition space volume features curved perimeter surfaces in the north and south, projecting the contour of the runway upward to the rectangular roof structure. The roof elements, projecting outward from the longitundinal perimeter along the intersection of floor plan and runway, distort the accustomed, conventional image of a hangar. The hangar as recognizable type is subject to formal transformation. Not a museum in a hangar, but a hangar as a museum. It thus evokes similarity and difference to the surrounding airport buildings.”

The Dornier Museum, photo by Jens Passoth

“The curved perimeter surface is made out of polycarbonate, an industrial and cost efficient material, which is being removed from its accustomed context. Its specific characteristics are taken into consideration and put to use, however distorted in their implementation. The thus created tension between the alien and the familiar results in the inclusion of the observer.

All perceptible building components are tied together by a white color code. Hierarchies produced by the mode of assembly, for instance of load-bearing and non-load bearing elements, are balanced via the unified color treatment.”

The Dornier Museum, photo by Jens Passoth

The Dornier Museum, photo by Brigida Gonzales

The Dornier Museum, photo by Brigida Gonzales

to the Allmann Sattler Wappner profile @ Architonic

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

The architectural practice around the Swiss born and New York based architect Bernard Tschumi realised the New Acropolis Museum in Athens, which is located within spitting distance of the world famous archaelogical excavation.

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

“The challenges of designing the New Acropolis Museum began with the responsibility of housing the most dramatic sculptures of Greek antiquity. This collection of objects shaped the program even before a site was chosen. The building’s polemical location added further layers of responsibility to the design. Located at the foot of the Acropolis, the site confronted us with sensitive archeological excavations, with the presence of the contemporary city and its street grid and with the Parthenon itself, one of the most influential buildings in Western civilization. Combined with a hot climate in an earthquake region, these conditions moved us to design a simple and precise museum with the mathematical and conceptual clarity of ancient Greece.

We first articulated the building into a base, middle and top, which are designed around the specific needs of each part of the program. The base of the museum floats on pilotis over the existing archeological excavations, protecting and consecrating the site with a network of columns placed in careful negotiation with experts so as not to disturb the sensitive work. This level contains the entrance lobby as well as temporary exhibition spaces, an auditorium, and all support facilities.”

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

“A glass ramp overlooking the archeological excavations leads to the galleries in the middle, in the form of a spectacular double-height room supported by tall columns. This level accommodates displays from the Archaic period to the Roman Empire.

The top, which is made up of the rectangular Parthenon Gallery arranged around an indoor court, rotates gently to orient the marbles of the Frieze exactly as they were at the Parthenon centuries ago. Its transparent enclosure provides ideal light for sculpture in direct view to and from the Acropolis using the most contemporary glass technology to protect the gallery against excessive heat and light. This new setting will offer an unprecedented context for understanding the accomplishments of the Acropolis complex. One of the goals of the top gallery is to reunite the Parthenon Frieze, currently dispersed in several world museums.”

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

New Acropolis Museum by Bernard Tschumi Architects, photo by Christian Richters

to the Bernard Tschumi Architects profile @ Architonic

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

The Basel based architects Herzog & de Meuron greatly enriched the Vitra Campus in Weil am Rhein, where architectural icons such as Alvaro Siza, Frank Gehry, Tadao Ando and Zaha Hadid carried out some of their most expressive works. Herzog & de Meuron’s stacked archetypical houses are the new domicile for Vitra’s Home Collection and will from now on be open Monday to Sunday from 10 am to 6 pm.

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

“The concept of the VitraHaus connects two themes that appear repeatedly in the oeuvre of Herzog & de Meuron: the theme of the archetypal house and the theme of stacked volumes. In Weil am Rhein, it was especially appropriate to return to the idea of the ur -house, since the primary purpose of the five-storey building is to present furnishings and objects for the home. Due to the proportions and dimensions of the interior spaces – the architects use the term ‘domestic scale’ – the showrooms are reminiscent of familiar residential settings. The individual ‘houses’, which have the general characteristics of a display space, are conceived as abstract elements. With just a few exceptions, only the gable ends are glazed, and the structural volumes seem to have been shaped with an extrusion press. Stacked into a total of five storeys and breathtakingly cantilevered up to fifteen metres in some places, the twelve houses, whose floor slabs intersect the underlying gables, create a three-dimensional assemblage – a pile of houses that, at first glance, has an almost chaotic appearance.”

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

VitraHaus by Herzog & de Meuron, photo by Iwan Baan

read more about the VitraHaus @ Architonic

to the Vitra collection @ Architonic

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

The Berlin and London based Pott Architects realised the new Art Campus in Berlin. The nested and spanned façade is made of a translucent membrane and part of an entire conversion of an old warehouse into a new centre for Contemporary Art.

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Here is what the architects explain:

“The opening of the New Central Berlin Station ´Hauptbahnhof´ in 2006 brought the vacant stretch of land to the north of the Spree curve into the focus of public interest.

The area – which covers the surface area of 40 football pitches and is twice as large as the Sony Centre in Potsdamer Platz and Daimler City – will in time be developed into an urban accommodation complex, complete with an art campus, Marina, flats, offices and restaurants.

A key component in the redevelopment of the area was the transformation of an old warehouse into a new centre for Contemporary Art, by Berlin and London based Pott Architects.

They were already commissioned to draw up a master plan for the Art Campus Berlin Project in the area around Hamburger Bahnhof, which was formerly home to numerous warehouses and brownfield sites.

Located directly at the Berlin Spandauer Canal their art forum entitledHalle am Wasser’ appears as a folded sculptural shape at the water´s edge and is now home to contemporary art galleries covering a total area of 2500 square meters.”

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Pott architects succeeded in transforming the formerly insignificant warehouse into a crystalline object, replacing the wretched façade with a multifunctional membrane foil that allows natural daylight into the exhibition halls and maintains a light and sculptural aesthetic from the outside.

The steel skeleton and walls of the hall were adapted to meet the needs of the new users.

The hall is divided into 6 units, between 280 to 600 square meters.

Each unit has its own sanitary and office space, located in a structural cube that sits away from the internal walls of the unit, with sanitary and storage spaces located at ground level and office space above.”

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

“The completion of the project was the starting signal for the regeneration and cultural use of the whole area to the north of the Spree.

The transformation of the ‘Halle am Wasser’ in addition to the existing art institutions in the area such as the Hamburger Bahnhof, the Flick Collection and numerous artist´s studios has ensured that the area is a significant part of the Berlin art scene and a centre of attraction for art enthusiasts worldwide. From 2010 the area is to be extended further to the west of Heidestrasse and the north of the central station, with more office units and residential developments planned.” (Nadine Claudius)

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Principal Architect: Ingo Pott

Project Team: Anja Schütt

Client: Vivico Real Estate GmbH

Project Years: 2006 – 2008

to the Pott Architect’s website