Posts tagged as 'Mexico'

Tue 15.6.

‘House in Chihuahua’ by Productora (MX)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 15.06.2010 - Tagged as: , ,

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

This luxurios single family house is part of a golf club community in the desert like northern region of Mexico and was designed by the Mexico City based architectural practice Productora. Partly built into the mountain slope the architects found a way to manage the big differneces between night and daytime.

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

“The House In Chihuahua is part of a golf club community in the desert like northern region of Mexico. The dwelling was designed to accommodate the special climatic circumstances of the area: in winter temperatures can fall to minus ten degrees Celsius, while in summertime temperatures can rise to above forty degrees Celsius. The differences between daytime and night time temperatures can vary by as much as twenty degrees. To balance the extreme temperature differences, we partially buried the house into the mountain slope to take advantage of the soil’s thermal mass. The colder soil around the house absorbs heat accumulated during the day, and at night the ground gives off heat to the building. The house is organized around a series of patios and roof openings that provide light, ventilation, and views to different areas of the house. The sloped roof acts as a new topography, which blurs the boundaries between the constructed area and the surrounding landscape.”

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

House in Chihuahua by Productora, photo by Iwan Baan

to the Productora profile @ Architonic

Mon 14.12.

‘N NE E SE S SO O NO’ by Héctor Zamora

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 14.12.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'N NE E SE S SO O NO', 2009 by Héctor Zamora

'N NE E SE S SO O NO', 2009, by Héctor Zamora

With the use of air or artificial wind in the context of galleries and museums the Mexican artist Héctor Zamora creates immaterial but physical and tectile spatial experiences. One of his most recent works is the installation ‘N NE E SE S SO O NO’ which was curated by Adriano Pedrosa.

'N NE E SE S SO O NO' by Héctor Zamora

'N NE E SE S SO O NO' by Héctor Zamora

The geometries of moving wind become visible volumes in the work N NE E SE S SO O NO, which addresses the illusion of the natural in relation to the visibility of the wind. Eight wind cones of differing heights are blowing in the four cardinal and four secondary directions within an enclosed space. We can infer that the wind is caused by fans inside the cones, but the scene nonetheless comes as a surprise. The functionality of the wind cones is subverted with both an aesthetic and a philosophical intent. A functional object is presented in a new and surreal way: it becomes unfamiliar, and in its unfamiliarity it becomes beautiful. Perhaps the root of the strangeness of the piece is in its confinement, the pointedly closed-off environment that makes the illusion so impossible. And of course there is the mystery of the cones’ differing directions, and the unexpected quality of life that they take on due to this individuality. Is the lie of life, we wonder, in fact a lie? Or would it be a lie to say that art has no life in the first place?” (Elvia Pyburn-Wilk)

'N NE E SE S SO O NO' by Héctor Zamora

'N NE E SE S SO O NO' by Héctor Zamora

to the Héctor Zamora website

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

This light and translucient wedding chapel in the traditional mexican baroque colonial style La Estancia Wedding Gardens was designed by the young Mexico City based Bunker Architects. The idea to construct a chapel for the garden cames, when one of Bunker´s associates decided to marry in these gardens – the client had been toying for some time with the idea of building the chapel. When he found out a young architect was getting married in his garden the commission to design and build the chapel was granted for what the architects thought was an almost ridiculous caprice: the client found very romantic the idea of an architect designing the chapel he would get married in.

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

Let’s see how this funny story continues:

“…That was the last thing he found romantic in the endless subsequent discussions that followed. He imagined a chapel in the same style of the gardens. We were all against styles. He wanted a classical approach. We were seduced by the “modern”. He desired to blend in. We believed in contrast. He preferred a closed wall chapel. We craved an open chapel. He was eccentric. Ok, in this we coincided. He required air conditioning. We disapproved of the idea given the size of the project… Bunker gradually won every point with eloquent, persuasive and almost stoical arguments. In the end, we did complete the chapel, inaugurate it with a wedding and it became the clients´ pampered and proud new offspring.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

“A crystal chapel in a warm tropical climate seemed like a contradiction in terms. The green house effect appeared to be something we could not elude. We decided on using U-profiled glass panes that are meant to work together as a single membrane. To separate them as single auto-bearing units, to reduce temperatures during the day, made them fragile and vulnerable. The contractor had never been exposed to this idea but was willing to give it a try. The construction went along as planned and our experiment proved successful. With this, we achieved a well ventilated space and a visual play between the interior and exterior.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

“The site for the chapel was carefully chosen within an enormous area of abundant vegetation. We selected a location that would not require the removal of any of the existing plants or trees, under large jacaranda trees, which form a natural arch over the chapel and provide it with ample shade, thus reducing temperatures during the day. We strived to bring about the least possible impact on the site.”

“The chapel was conceived as a box and compressed to form a peaked roof. Different shapes were traced on its lateral facades to form a prism which was then subtracted from the main volume. We covered the four facades with U-profiled glass and spaced each piece 10cm. apart from each other. In the altar façade, a cross was outlined and subtracted from the glass veil creating a window that looks out onto the surrounding garden. Exuberant vegetation permeates through the glass lattice walls thus creating a graceful and rhythmical dialogue between the artificial and natural environment.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Sebastian Suarez

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Sebastian Suarez

Location: La Estancia Gardens, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico

Site Area: 60,000 sq. meters

Gross Floor Area: 117 sq. meters

Building Height: 6.50 m

Construction System: Concrete foundation; steel columns and beams

Client/Owner: Promotora Amates

Principals: Esteban Suarez, Jorge Arteaga, Sebastian Suarez , Santiago Gitanjalli, Zaida Montañana

Collaborators: Paola Moire, Miguel Angel Martinez, Jimena Muhlia

Main Contractor: ETASA

Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Cien Acres

Civil & Structural Engineer: DAE

to the Bunker Arquitectura website

Thu 3.9.

CVA House In Mexico City by Materia Arquitectos

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 03.09.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

CVA House by Materia Arcquitectos

CVA House by Materia Arcquitectos

Located in the outskirts of Mexico City, the project was designed for a relaxed life-styled family. The long, rectangular site (335 sq m) was constrained on 3 sides by other houses leaving only a short front access face. The house lives around a patio that serves as the continuation of the interior spaces. The design created a series of episodes along the house defined by the use of natural light and materials.

CVA House by Materia Arcquitectos

CVA House by Materia Arcquitectos

Located in the outskirts of Mexico City, the project was designed for a relaxed life-styled family. The long, rectangular site (335 sq m) was constrained on 3 sides by other houses leaving only a short front access face. The house lives around a patio that serves as the continuation of the interior spaces. The design created a series of episodes along the house defined by the use of natural light and materials.

Inside

Inside

"Defined by the use of natural materials"

"Defined by the use of natural materials"

seen @ World Architecture News

to the Materia Arquitectos website

Showroom Ofimodul

Photos by Eduardo Hernàndez

This extension, designed by the very young – non of the partners has reached the age of 30 yet – mexican architecture pactice stación-ARquitectura Arquitectosdesign, is a small showroom and a design center for a company specialized in office furniture.

Showroom designed by stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos

Showroom designed by stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos, Photos by Eduardo Hernàndez

What the architect say:

In this space both the first and the last steps of the manufacturing process of the furniture should be unified: the design stage as well as their exhibition and sale.

It was chosen to make an intervention that will put in manifest each program of the building, making a constructive operation that transcends the site’s structure, composed by one side of the manufacture building (factory) and by the other a loading and parking area for trucks, both already existing in the terrain.

Showroom by stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos

Showroom by stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos, Photos by Eduardo Hernàndez

So the building is formed by two parts, one heading to the front yard of the terrain and the other that is embedded in the factory. Each part is separated one from the other by a different ground level and by a basic services core. The exterior part of the building was built over a former parking lot, as a condition that the same program will be respected in the intervention. This way the volume rise over the vehicles of directives and clients and its connected with the interior part of the building, built over a former storage space of the factory that is now used for the design and monitoring of what takes place inside the warehouse were the furniture is manufactured, so it requires a high degree of acoustic insulation between both activities.

This way half the interior part of the building (inside the manufacture area) is closed and opaque meanwhile the other half in the exterior (front yard) is open and almost transparent, because is there where the access and exhibition zone of the finished furniture takes place, making its function of a big shelter.

Inside the showroom

Inside the showroom

Project name: Showroom Ofimodul.

Architects: stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos + Armando Cantú

Associated Architect: Armando Cantú.

Location: Monterrey, México
Project team: César Augusto Guerrero Rodríguez, Armando Cantú, Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal, Carlos Raúl Flores Leal, María Sevilla Gómez.

Size of the project : 272 m2.

Project year: 2008

Construction: 2008 - 2009

Materials: Concrete, Steel and Glass.

to the stación-ARquitectura Arquitectos website

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

A beautiful example of modern earthen architecture is the Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts in Mexico, designed by Taller de Arquitectura- Mauricio Rocha.

The archiect decided to use the earth left behind from several other campus construction projects for the typography of his construction site – a talus which is a garden and isolation for the school at the same time. This brought about the idea of building the whole school of rammed earth. The earth for the buildings was extracted from areas around Oaxaca with the quality needed for this type of construction. Rammed earth is not only the perfect material for the extreme climatic conditions of Oaxaca, because it creates an optimal microclimate. It also offers the adequate acoustic insulation a school needs.

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

Oaxaca School of Plastic Arts by Mauricio Rocha

to the Taller de Arquitectura website

seen @ Earth Architecture

Tue 4.8.

Building City within a City – Garduño Arquitectos

Posted by NoéMie Schwaller on 04.08.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

Monte Elbruz Building by Garduño Arquitectos, Mexico City 2008. Photos: Sófocles Hernández, Paul Czitrom. Garduño Arquitectos.

Monte Elbruz Building by Garduño Arquitectos, Mexico City 2008. Photos: Sófocles Hernández, Paul Czitrom. Garduño Arquitectos.

Mexico-based Garduño Arquitectos have designed a 24-unit housing development project: the Monte Elbruz building of 6 floors (local regulation) on a small site located in Polanco, Mexico City. The linear courtyard is introduced in between two linear apartment blocks.

The lot was located in a difficult area, originally classified as high-density and already fully developed, with adjoining buildings 14 to 30 storeys high. Designing a linear façade would have led to 60% of the apartments having an interior view. Taking these variables into account, Garduño Arquitectos opted for designing two side blocks within a 60 cm distance of the borders, thus generating a central courtyard to play the role of green area, access and lighting center, but that would also generate facades proportioned in terms of the project’s scale.

All apartments are two-leveled.

All apartments are two-leveled.

The first eight units are provided with a private garden and the last eight with a roof garden. In addition, all apartments are two-leveled. The street access becomes a stroll past a reflecting pool and gardens, employing 90% of the available space as green area. The project includes a rain water recycling system for irrigation and car washing. The front façade boasts two slim vertical concrete sand-colored beams separated by the volume containing the home. These pieces were cast with a double concrete face and marble grain and were later finished with a marteline, bringing out a tree that begins with the trunk at the level of the first beam and continues the trace in the second one.

At the back of the building a vertical opening in the elevator cube was designed, covering it with an image of the sky that is part of a story in which a group of children invent a flying umbrella.

Transversal Section. Exterior finish: Glass, Aluminium, Concrete.

One of the main goals of this proposal is to generate the illusion of slimmer volumes, avoid noise and incorporate and proportion the project with its environment in a positive fashion. The inner façade was designed as a city within a city, striving to achieve the residents’ movement and interaction by means of exposed circulations and aluminum panels containing glass frames and tilting vents. At the back of the building a vertical opening in the elevator cube was designed, covering it with an image of the sky that is part of a story in which a group of children invent a flying umbrella.

 

 

to Garduño Arquitectos

 

 

seen @ plusmood

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