Posts tagged as 'Maison&Objet 2010'

'PMR' chaise longue by

'PMR' chaise longue by Paulo Mendes da Rocha for Objekto

It’s probably safe to say that the chaise longue isn’t an object-type that sits at the top of the list when it comes to its actual daily use. But, for some reason, it continues to attract the imagination of product designers. Perhaps it is due to its sculptural nature, echoing the form of the body; or because of its memorable exploration by such Modernists as Charlotte Perriand and Lily Reich.

'PMR'

'PMR' chaise longue by Paulo Mendes da Rocha for Objekto

At any rate, Brazilian architect and designer Paulo Mendes da Rocha has created an extremely elegant, thin sheet-steel chaise longue, whose real beauty becomes apparent when it is viewed in profile: the piece turns into a highly graphic set of lines and a dot.

 

to the Objet & Maison 2010 highlights report on Architonic


'PMR' chaise longue by Paulo Mendes da Rocha for Objekto

'PMR' chaise longue by Paulo Mendes da Rocha for Objekto

'Desile' by Vange

'Desile' by Vange

At this year’s Maison & Objet in Paris the Belgian manufacturer Vange presented this folding chair designed by Chrsitian Desile in a new edition.

‘Desile’ can be opened on both sides and the seating can be turned around. This enables the user to chose the preferred colour.

'Desile' by Vange

'Desile' by Vange

'Desile' by Vange

'Desile' by Vange

to the Vange website

more folding chairs @ Architonic

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

Italian design manufacturer Cerruti Baleri has launched a new seat/daybed at the 2010 Maison et Objet fair in Paris. Called ‘Drop’ and designed by architect Leonardo Perugi, its reduced, highly geometric form invites the user to transform its shape according to their mood.

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

The drop-like shape of the head pillow has both an aesthetic and a practical function. Through a geometric fit, it structurally locks the seat in its closed position without the need for any fastening device.

 

In interview with Dailytonic at Maison et Objet, Perugi explained that ‘Drop’ ‘is something you can use as a suit. You wear this piece. It’s for you, your body, your life. You can use it to create new situations. It’s not a fossil or a museum piece. It’s to be used every day. Like a garment.’

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

'Drop' seat/daybed by Leonardo Perugi for Cerruti Baleri

Perugi is flattered by comments that his design is reminsicent of the ‘radicalism and informalism’, as he describes it, of 1960s Italian furniture design. ‘Many people say this is from the 60s and link it to the work of Joe Colombo,’ he told Dailytonic. ‘I’m very proud of this. It’s a huge compliment for me. Although, it’s a big responsibility and there’s pressure to do something even better next time.’

 

to the Cerruti Baleri collections on architonic.com

 

to the Cerruti Baleri website

Fri 22.1.

‘Radiation’ collection by NOCC (FR)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 22.01.2010 - Tagged as: , , , ,

'Radiation' table and chair by NOCC

'Radiation' table and chair by NOCC

The Paris based design practice NOCC unveiled their new ‘Radiation’ collection at this year’s Maison&Objet in Paris. The collection consists of two ‘positive’ mutations: the ‘Hypertrophy chair’ and the ‘Outgrowth coffee table’. The hypertrophy of one extended armrest complements the use of the chair as a functional object. The chair can then be used as a newspaper rack, coat hanger, etc. The outgrowth on the table offers additional storage space.

You can find NOCC at hall 5B near exit R7.

'Hypertrophy' chair by NOCC

'Hypertrophy' chair by NOCC

Here is what NOCC explains:

“We imagined a scenario in which traditional pieces of furniture would have endured some kind of radiation; where their genes would have mutated “ said Jean-Christophe Orthlieb and Juan Pablo Naranjo, co-founder of NOCC. “The next generation of these pieces would then manifest the mutations. We came up with many versions of possible mutants. We then wondered which of these mutations would be “positive” evolutions, that would enable the entity to better survive in its environment, while others we called “negative” evolutions (these comprised the majority) and did nothing, even reducing the ability of the entity to survive in its environment.”

'Outgrowth' coffee table by NOCC

'Outgrowth' coffee table by NOCC

“Radiation Collection (in Tchernobyl) is a collection based on the evolution of objects. This experimentation has created adaptations comparable to the ones observed in nature’s species, resulting -in the long run- to evolution. The purpose of this collection is to explore the utilitarian possibilities of changes in the traditional shapes of furniture, as we know them archetypically.”

Chair mutations by NOCC

Chair mutations by NOCC

Coffee table mutations by NOCC

Coffee table mutations by NOCC

Processing the 'Outgrowth' coffee table

Processing the 'Outgrowth' coffee table

to the NOCC website