Posts tagged as 'Irish design'

The History Chair by Cathal Loughnane & Peter Sheehan

The History Chair by Cathal Loughnane & Peter Sheehan

A smooth solid ash frame and thin leather seat distinguish The History Chair, the outcome of a long standing collaboration between Design Partners’ creative director Cathal Loughnane, and former partner and creative director Peter Sheehan, aided by Design Partners’ engineering manager, James Lynch.

 

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'Ireland, Design and Visual Culture', edited by Linda King and Elaine Sisson, is published by Cork University Press

Thanks to our friends at Cork University Press, Architonic is giving away five FREE COPIES of ‘Ireland, Design and Visual Culture: Negotiating Modernity 1922–1992’ to Architonic Facebook fans. The draw will take place on 23 September. Good luck!>>



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This book is long overdue.


The first comprehensive collection of scholarly essays on 20th-century Irish design and visual culture, whose trajectory was inextricably bound up with the development of Ireland as an independent state, ‘Ireland, Design and Visual Culture: Negotiating Modernity 1922–1992′ takes an engaging interdisciplinary approach to the critical examination of how Irish modernity was shaped within, and communicated by, such creative discourses as architecture, advertising, currency, illustration, industrial design, print ephemera, public spectacle and theatre design. (more…)

Eileen Gray's iconic hand-lacquered 'Brick Screen' has been reproduced by ClassiCon

As part of the ‘Classic’ series, German manufacturer ClassiCon has launched a a re-edition of the iconic ‘Brick Screen’ designed between 1922 and 1925 by the renowned Irish designer Eileen Gray.

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Ireland's first apearance on the international exhibitionary stage at the 1939 New York World's Fair saw Michael Scott deliver the ultra-modern Irish Pavilion, complete with externally mounted sculpture of 'Mother Éire' and type by Eric Gill

Ireland is in a reflective mood these days. With the island nation on the edge of Europe facing up to the reality of a severely damaged economy and a decimated construction industry, nostalgia is doing what it’s wont to do. A recently published book on how the country, back in its fledgling days, used the language of modernism in its project of nation-building and an exhibition currently running at the Irish Museum of Modern Art on the development of modernity in Ireland both contribute to a re-engagement with an internationally under-appreciated strand of Irish architecture that sought to posit the state as a modern and democratic society. The grass is sometimes greener, even on the Emerald Isle.

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