Posts tagged as 'interior architecture'

Mon 11.1.

‘Chatou’ by H2O architectes (FR)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 11.01.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

The Paris based H2O architectes created this ‘inhabitable furniture’ for a little backyard building to provide a private space for a teenager looking for his independence.

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

“The program includes elements necessary for an autonomous life including sleeping, living, studying and washing. It had been decided between the parents and teenager that meals would still be a shared time in the family home…

Due to the very limited floor space (12m²) we tested different options assembling the programs into a kind of “inhabitable furniture”. Multiple spaces are connected in a unique volume in a series of four split-levels with dedicated areas for each of the programmatic functions.
Silver birch plywood was chosen as the singular material for this living-space-as-furniture, giving a visual coherence and unity to the details and interlocking spaces.”

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

Client : private

Programm : Creation of a living space for a teenager in a 12m² building

Location : Chatou, Paris suburb

Project year: 2008

to the H2O architectes website

Porcelain cookingplate in use

Porcelain cookingplate in use

COLLAGE ‘the kitchen demystified’ is the Master project of the Swedish designer Isabelle Olsson. This Porcelain cookingplate is part of a comprehensive kitchen concept.

Porcelain cookingplate stored

Porcelain cookingplate stored

“What should we have for dinner?” is one of the most challenging and anxiety provoking questions of today. In a society where appreciation for eating rituals and common knowledge about food have been almost lost, a new look at layout, space and functions of kitchens is needed to demystify and dedramatize the dogmatic image people have of cooking so they can rediscover the fun in the kitchen.

During my Master Project I was dedicated to investigate how we consume food today.”

Porcelain cookingplates

Porcelain cookingplates

“Instead of alienating the user with its size and orderliness, Collage ‘the kitchen demystified’ encourages a flexible, unprompted and relaxed approach to the subject of cooking. It includes products for storage, preparation, cooking and cleaning so people will be able to compose their kitchen spontaneously by placing the parts inside, outside, against a wall or free in space. The design allows for secondary usage, parts can be exchanged or restored and the setup is rearrangable: No matter whether your cooking mood changes or you move to another place, the kitchen will go along.”

to COLLAGE ‘the kitchen demystified’ by Isabelle Olsson @ Architonic

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

The Berlin based architecture and design practice coordination berlin realised the Monopol Lounge including all applied furniture for the Art Forum Berlin in 2007.

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

“The Monopol Lounge was located on a gallery of 140 sqm in area in exhibition hall 18, constructed in the early thirties. The Lounge overlooked the goings in the over 100 galleries of contemporary art below. In cooperation with the Monopol Magazine and the Hotel Brandenburger Hof, Coordination designed and planned the complete public appearance and coordinated the implementation thereof.”

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

“Our claim to the design was to develop a unique formal language for this project, which would feature a consistent quality and recognition factor in its entirety as well as in detail: Like with the stool, we have deliberately attempted throughout the whole environment to unite worlds which seem not combinable at first. The visual and atmospheric bracket is formed by a 22m back-lit curtain wall with a new edition of Berlin artist Jonathan Meese, which surrounds the space and grants the visitor a welcome break from the fair’s hustle and bustle.

On the tables, one finds tableware and table accessories by KPM which were assorted specifically for the Lounge.”

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Monopol Lounge by coordination berlin, photo by Tilman Thürmer

Design team: Tilman Thürmer, Flip Sellin, Katrin Weiß

Client: Juno Kunstverlag

more architecture and design projects @ Architonic

The Hansviertel Project by Gisberg Poeppler

The Hansviertel Project by Gisberg Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Hansaviertel in Berlin is a quarter which was planned and realised as an example of successful and forward-looking architecture in post-war Germany. Architects like Arne Jacobsen, Alvar Aalto and Oscar Niemeyer were amongst others protagonists of the project. Gisberg Poeppler had the pleasure to renovate one appartment in the famous Walter Gropius building.

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

Here is what the architect explains:

“The 90qm property is tucked in the corner of a large modern apartment building, designed by Walter Gropius for the 1957 Interntational Building Exhibition, “Interbau”. As if intentionally planned to coincide with this important milestone, the renovation was completed just in time to celebrate the 90th year anniversary of this now classic modernist BAUHAUS experiment in urban living.

The Hansaviertel Project showcases Gisbert Pöppler’s vision and talent, unique among German architects, for breathing vibrant life into stale spaces both structurally as well as by paying specific attention to the details of interior design. With a bold use of color and brave willingness to re-interpret the bones of an historical building, he has injected new-found energy and innovation into this fading model of ideal living.”

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

“Following Walter Gropius’ key intention of creating flexible living spaces for everyone, Gisbert Pöppler projected this noble trajectory into the 21st century. With a single swing he succeeded in unifying the main rooms of the apartment along a sunny bank of existing windows, ripping out the walls dividing the dark, boxy spaces. Giving full trust to Gisbert Pöppler’s vision – the client only inspected the apartment twice during the renovation process discovering that what were once three closed, claustrophobic compartments had become an expansive pass-through space, providing a colorful journey from the tart lemon livingroom to the chinese red kitchen and into the emerald green office.”

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

“In addition to these simple but transformative structural changes, Gisbert Pöppler’s client showed an openness to try new approaches to fixturing and decor, giving him the freedom to experiment . As every pearl has a grain of sand at its center, so do some of the key elements of this apartment’s interior fixturings; combining an eclectic collection of high and low-cost interior features. In the vibrantly detailed kitchen, for instance, the bones of the cabinets and freestanding counter block come from Ikea, but are then embellished with dedar Mindanao bianco textile surfaces and cabinet door handles costing far more than the structures they cover. In the livingroom, a custom designed china cabinet becomes a central decorative element, simultaneously providing a functional conversation piece and elegant object d’art.”

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

“When it came to developing a color system for the apartment, there were lots of conversations between the architect and client about color, leading to a pallette that plays off the muted tones used on the exterior of the Hansaviertel’s buildings. Saturated hues of aqua blue and sunny lemon are playfully combined to create the effect of sleeping at the bottom of a swimming pool. A bright contrast of black, white and Chinese red suggests kitchen-life inside a chili pepper and emerald walls enclose a cozy study, stuffed with a forest of books and leafy trees just outside the window. Throughout the apartment, glossy black trim acts like a unifying element that ties each room to the next and leads to the handsomely outfitted bathroom, lined in tiny gleaming black tiles.”

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Hansaviertel Project by Gisbert Poeppler, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

“In addition to being a vibrant showcase of modernism modernized for the 21st century, this apartment succeeds as a comfortably spacious home for its occupant – with new-found expansiveness and ample storage defying the modest 90qm footprint it leaves on this historic Berlin neighborhood.”

The Le Corbusier building at Hansaviertel in Berlin, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

The Walter Gropius building at Hansaviertel in Berlin, photo by Wolfgang Stahr

more Interior architecture projects @ Architonic

‘life in the city of tomorrow’, a documentary by Marian Engel

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten

Together with the interior architects of i29 the Dutch practice Snelder Architecten realised this interior design for a public school in Amstelveen in the south of Amsterdam.

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Here is what the architects explain:

Architecture and interior
“In the design for the new accommodations of public school Panta Rhei in Amstelveen (NL) there is a lot of attention on the balance between freedom and a sense of security. Snelder Architecten realised a building with many open multifunctional spaces where students can make themselves familiar with the teaching material. The interior design by i29 links up with that perfectly and gives the spaces an identity that connects with the students’ environment and addresses them directly and personally. i29 let itself be inspired by the name of the school. Panta Rhei, meaning ‘everything flows’, ‘everything is in motion’. This led to a design that leaves space for the imagination of the users, offering elements that can be used flexibly, which also propagates the school’s identity.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Poems

“Throughout the entire school poems have been applied to the linoleum floors and the furniture. The thought behind this is that there are moments outside of the classroom when you can learn and gain insights: often a casual setting is very inspiring. Maybe these poems provide a different perspective in an unguarded moment. i29 commissioned the poet Erikjan Harmens for this. He worked out themes like insecurity and friendship together with the students. The open texts leave room for their own interpretation. i29 modelled the poems in ‘carpets of text’ in which the letters stick together and seem to flow from each other. From a distance the texts form intriguing graphic patterns. This imagery has been implemented by i29 in the new school logo, the facade and the signposting throughout the school. The furniture, which was made to measure, is informal and dynamic. Because work takes place both in groups and individually, i29 itself designed tables in asymmetrical, angular shapes. These shapes allow the furniture to be linked together in all kinds of ways and different configurations can be made, such as square, circular or star-shaped set-up. This means the pieces can be used in the general spaces as well as in the classrooms and staff rooms.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Structures
“i29: ‘We think in structures and rhythms and not in taste or style. You can look at it as music which deals with harmony and contrast. One tone is not unconnected to the next and silence is essential.’ i29 has realised a spatial composition which has been carried out without compromise. Over the neutral basis of tables and benches there is a fine fabric of black elements; consisting of the poems, the hassocks and the Magis One-chairs. The furniture is strong and robust, but does not look bulky, rather refined. Remarkable in this context is the choice of the Grcic chair. It matches well here because of its technical aura and it urges you to think about the design and production process. It is a vocational school after all. Just because this is not a university, does not mean you do not have to challenge the students.”

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

Panta Rhei School by i29 and Snelder Architecten, photo by Jeroen Musch

more information @ Arkinetia

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

With the new simplistic interior design for a Stockholm shop of the high fashion brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair, the Swedish practice Guise was nominated for this year’s Great indoors Award, initiated by internationally renowned magazine Frame. Within the same event Guise was awarded Design Firm of the Year 2009.

Interior for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair by Guise

Interior for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair by Guise

Here is what the designers say:

THE PROJECT

“The project concerns a new concept store for Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair. The Swedish fashion brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair works with traditional typologies of clothes but deconstructs them and create new hybrid garments. The assignment was to design an entirely new concept store that meets the commercial aspects of a retail space, but foremost to design the spatial encounter with the brand Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

CONCEPT

The retail concept is based on Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair design methods, but transferred into architecture. Existing architectural typologies have been deformed in order to meet both the functional and the commercial requirements for a store interior. The visual presences of the furniture are designed to be ambivalent; they should resemble a stair although clearly having another purpose.

Jani Kristoffersen, one of the founders of Guise explains: “The ambition was to use strong silhouettes whereupon we choose a double helix-shaped stair as a basic form. In order to adapt the helix shape to meet the functional requirements we had to deform the shape of the stair until it met the commercial need for exposure, but also in order to give it an unique character of its own”.

Andreas Ferm, one of the founders of Guise continues: “Since the main form is folded and rotated it both conceals and exposes the garments and accessories while you move through the store. The rotated shape aims to create a more dynamic experience for the customers, by that we try to create a more well directed spatial experience.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

“The stairs has become the main spatial carriers of the retail concept Fifth Avenue Shoe Repair, but in addition to the stairs a shelving system was designed to meet the flexible needs of the store. The exposure has to adapt to the changing needs of a retail shop. Each shelf is designed and tailored specially for each placement in the store. The shelves consist of a rigorous framework of steel rods, which together create a matrix of small cubic space in the structure, all with dimensions of 360x360x360 mm. By using the cubic dimensions of the structure, the clothes that hung in its bottom exposed in two directions, either along a wall, or by turning 90 degrees to allow for a frontal exposure from a wall.

To the shelf, hundreds of thin black steel plates were designed in order to make the shelf to become rearrangeable by changing the position of the plates. Both the visual aesthetics and the functionality of the shelves are radically changed by shifting the position of the plates.

Not only the furniture has been custom made, but also the cash register, the doll exposure, fitting rooms, doors and the mirrors are special designed to enhance the overall shopping experience.”

Interior by Guise

Interior by Guise

to the Guise website

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

In close collaboration the Dutch practices Studio Roelof Mulder and bureau Ira Koers realised the new interior design for the Library of the University of Amsterdam. The project won The Great Indoors Award 2009 in the category Serve & Facilitate.

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“A library whose decor no longer consists of books has been turned into a ‘home’ in which to study.

The UvA’s enormous collection of books is kept in closed repositories, book depots and at various open locations. A growing number of students, anywhere from 1500 to 5000, visit the University Library every day in order to study and pick up their digitally ordered books. Despite plans for a new building in the future, the university wished to have a new, temporary interior design for the 2500 m2 space that would comprise study rooms plus 235 extra workspaces, the canteen, the information centre with its desk, the hallways, and an automated lending area.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“To offer students a good second home, we wanted to achieve two important things: a space like the white page of a book where the students themselves would play the main role in determining how it is filled in, and in certain areas a domestic atmosphere where the students could also study informally.

For instance, in one of the study rooms you will find a number of kitchen tables where you can work in groups under the lamp, a chesterfield couch for reading a newspaper, various sitting areas for a short break and special telephone areas in the hallways between the quiet study rooms. The columns in the canteen are transformed into illuminated trees with low energy light bulbs.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

“Until recently, borrowed books could only be picked up at the library desk during office hours.

Now the students can pick up their ordered books themselves in a newly designed red room that is open until midnight, including weekends. In red cases with 1105 red crates, piles of books lie ready for the borrowers. Because these books come from different locations, this is the heart of the University Library, with a back office hidden from view in which the books are readied for self-service with the RFID system.”

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

Library of the University of Amsterdam by Studio Roelof Mulder & bureau Ira Koers

to the bureau Ira Koers website

to the Studio Roelof Mulder website

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

The Dutch interior and furniture designer Maurice Mentjens recently unveiled this new office for the advertising agency PostPanic – the company produces both commercial projects for the international advertising, retail, broadcast and music industries and its own internal projects – in Amsterdam.

'A professional playground' by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

'A professional playground' by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

“PostPanic’s projects are strongly focused on images and perception, and the design and layout of the studio directly influence that. This explains why PostPanic, when planning to move in 2008 to a new building at the Westerdoksdijk in Amsterdam, commissioned designer Maurice Mentjens (Holtum, The Netherlands) to design an interior that not only would be pleasant and workable, but also inspiring, and a reflection of the studio’s creative and headstrong mind.

Mentjens’ field of activity: an over five meters high, empty room on the ground floor, the big windows in the slanted facade overlooking the river IJ. Large concrete columns support the concrete construction.

In the briefing, functionality was the biggest priority. To ensure a constant quality, PostPanic purposely chooses to produce, direct, design and animate in-house to stay truth to their original vision, once in production. This approach requires that the various departments of PostPanic each have their clearly divided and defined areas. But at the same time PostPanic required to maintain as much as possible the openness and transparency that the place offered. The design also had to take into account that the workforce fluctuates from 14 to 40, depending on the different stages of production.”

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

Point of departure

“In his design Mentjens took the existing concrete structure, and more specifically the large concrete columns, as his point of departure. The distance between the columns defines the dimensions of the subsequent areas. The width of production room, meeting room and staff room measures the span between two columns, the studio up on the mezzanine measures twice this size.

By introducing the mezzanine, Mentjens creates the required floor space without compromising the studio’s open feel. Because the low floor height doesn’t allow a lowered ceiling, pipes stay on display. Combined with the large concrete columns, the smooth concrete floors, the lack of thresholds and the fluorescent tubes on the ceiling, this emphasizes the slightly raw, industrial feel the interior has to it.”

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijkby Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijkby Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

Ground floor

“The tall hall, a neutral space with bold elements, at the same time functions as the entry and as exhibition space, is in use for seminars and film screenings and acts as the office’s living room. Wedged between two columns is a monumental, oak grandstand that takes up a quarter of the studio’s width and doubles as stairs to the mezzanine. The grandstand is facing a screen that’s suspended above the bar. This detached bar, tiled in white tiles, is simultaneously an autonomous object and recalls an old-fashioned kitchen.
Parallel to the facade, diagonally placed, is a grand table, meant for reading and dining. This 16-seater (5mx1.20m) holds a lowering in its centre to store books and magazines. Bar, grandstand, table and screen together make up the office’s ‘recreation zone’. From time to time the employees, sitting on the grandstand, a beer in hand, enjoy a film or football match together.
Attached to the ceiling above the grandstand, an installation of fluorescent tubes radiates over the different areas.”

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

“Attached to two columns in the kitchen are two wooden beams that both serve as a bookcase and as a demarcation between the kitchen and the adjacent production room. Floors and walls in the production room are covered with a deeply red, Persian-style carpet, which softens the nature of the concrete and at the same time dampens the sounds. This semi-open space holds just one, elongated table (6.20mx2m). Employees store their belongings in trolleys that can be parked in a grey, open cupboard. The cupboard extends till the first floor’s handrail height and thus acts as the upper side of the staff room’s balustrade.

The meeting room – floor, walls and table carpeted as it being one single object – with its fluid lines resembles a futuristic grotto. Large wooden pivot doors separate meeting room and hall.

The mirroring walls in the edit room invoke an illusion of endless space. A carpeted niche in one of the walls forms a bench on which clients can sit down and watch clips. These clips are projected on a big screen that is integrated in a purposely built, glossy black edit table.”

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

PostPanic - Westerdoksdijk by Maurice Mentjens, photo by Arjen Schmitz

continue @ Architonic

to the Maurice Mentjens website

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