Posts tagged as 'hotel'

Bayside Marina Hotel by Yasutaka Yoshimura Architects, photo by Yasutaka Yoshimura

The Tokyo based architectural practice of Yasutaka Yoshimura designed this prefabricated hotel on the bayside of Yokohama. The long and narrow containers – fabricated in Thailand and assembled in Japan – are randomly placed and offer each guest room a unique sea view.

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The Waterhouse in Shanghai by Neri & Hu Design and Research Office, photo by Derryck Menere

This successful conversion of a 1930s Japanese Army headquarter into a 19-room boutique hotel, located at the new Cool Docks development on the South Bund District of Shanghai, was realised by the locally based Neri & Hu Design and Research Office. The architectural concept behind NHDRO’s renovation rests on a clear contrast of what is old and new.

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'Hotel SUB' by Pir II Arkitektkontor

The Trondheim and Oslo based architects of Pir II Arkitektkontor realised this partly subterranean holiday apartments located on one of Noways finest sandy beach in Stokkøya. In order to minimise the environmental impact the appartments where partly build into the slope.

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The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Jeff Goldberg / ESTO for Polshek Partnership Architects

Beside several greening projects in Asian metropolises the Manhattan High Line is another example for resindent-friendly and ecologically worthwhile reuse of disused industrial or infrastructural areas. The Standard Hotel designed by Polshek Partnership Architects, towers over the pedestrian aisle and builds the perfect vertical component of this new green belt.

The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Jeff Goldberg / ESTO for Polshek Partnership Architects

“Andre Balazs Properties’ Standard brand has no signature architectural style. Each hotel is unique: the brand is recognized for designs that are specific to and expressive of their context. Todd Schliemann’s design for The Standard, New York exploits this mandate: the hotel is undeniably of its place; it blurs the distinction between public and private in a city whose identity is a s much about neighborhoods and intimacy as it is about anonymity; and it immerses itself in the activity of the street at the same time as its hovering form disengages it. Completed in 2009, the new eighteen-story, 204,500sf, 337-room hotel is located in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District, a vibrant neighborhood on the City’s western edge.”

The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Jeff Goldberg / ESTO for Polshek Partnership Architects

“The design celebrates the opportunities and challenges of interacting with the High Line, an abandoned, elevated railroad line, which has been developed as a new linear public park. The Standard engages its urban context through contrast, blending unique architectural and structural concepts within a complex and changing urban fabric. Sculptural piers, whose forms clearly separate the building from the orthogonal street grid, raise the building fifty-seven feet off the street, allowing the horizontally-scaled industrial landscape to pass beneath it and natural light to penetrate to the street. The building’s two slabs are “hinged,” angled to further emphasize the hotel’s distinction from the city’s grid and its levitation above the neighborhood. The juxtaposition of the building’s materials – poured-in-place, board-formed concrete and glass – reflects the character of New York City: the gritty quality of the concrete contrasts with the refinement of the glass. The concrete grid provides a delicate frame for the exceedingly transparent water-white glass, the two materials unified in the continuous plane of the curtain wall. This exterior wall breaks with the traditional architecture of hotels, replacing opacity with transparency, privacy with openness and defining a new paradigm.”

The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Thomas Loof

The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Nikolas Koenig

The Standard Hotel by Polshek Partnership Architects, photo by Nikolas Koenig

to the Polshek Partnership Architects profile @ Architonic

more about the Manhattan High Line @ Architonic

Inntel Hotel by Molenaar & Van Winden architecten/ WAM architecten photo by Roel Backaert

The iconic green wooden houses of the Zaan region are traditionally small and modest. Anyway, the Delft based architect Wilfried van Winden (WAM architecten) found a way to integrate the characteristic architecture into an eleven-storeyed hotel complex providing 160 guest rooms, a bar-restaurant, conference accommodation, a swimming pool and a wellness centre with a Finnish sauna and a Turkish bath. Constructed of timber and Eternit fibre cement cladding, the edifice is expressive, with varied fenestration, wide protruding sections, and elegant white eaves and barge-boards.

Inntel Hotel by Molenaar & Van Winden architecten/ WAM architecten photo by Roel Backaert

Here is what the architects say:

A stack of traditional Zaandam houses Wilfried van Winden envisages the hotel as a temporary home, alluding to that transience with the stack of houses. Visually speaking the structure is built up from a varied stacking of almost seventy individual little houses, executed in four shades of the traditional green of the Zaan region. The hotel is unique, familiar yet original and idiosyncratic. It is a design that could be realised only in Zaandam but at the same time transcends and reinvigorates local tradition. It was, moreover, specifi cally tailored to this site. ‘The Blue House’, inspired by the work Claude Monet painted at Zaandam in 1871, is the ultimate attention-grabber. The overall result is striking, the building exemplary for the Fusion Architecture that Wilfried van Winden champions. Fusion represents an inventive way of linking present and past, tradition and innovation, high culture and low. This generates a novel expressiveness that corresponds to specifi c local practices but is at the same time universal. ‘But architecture naturally makes a direct appeal to the emotions as well,’ notes Van Winden. ‘An acquaintance recently commented, “When I drive into Zaandam and see the building standing there a smile inevitably spreads across my face.” You could hardly ask for a more wonderful compliment.’

Inntel Hotel by Molenaar & Van Winden architecten/ WAM architecten photo by Roel Backaert

Inntel Hotel by Molenaar & Van Winden architecten/ WAM architecten photo by Roel Backaert

Inntel Hotel by Molenaar & Van Winden architecten/ WAM architecten photo by Roel Backaert

more hotel architecture @ Architonic

to the WAM architecten website

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

The Mumbai-based Sanjay Puri Architects realised this business hotel in the center of Kolkatta.

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Here is what the architects say:

“Facing a busy arterial road of the city and flanked by commercial buildings on either side with a residential building at the rear, this small plot for a business hotel had a height limitation of 24 m.

The hotel is planned in eight levels with public spaces occupying the first three levels and four levels of rooms above with a rooftop lounge bar on the topmost floor. Since there was nothing in the surroundings to look out to at the lower levels, the entire volume comprising of the public spaces and the vertical circulation is punctuated by small 45 cm diameter circular openings. These openings allow natural light into the public spaces at daytime and are made of frit glass so that the exterior is purposely not seen and the public spaces have an identity of their own once one enters and experiences them. Each opening is lit by LEDs during the evening hours that change colour as the night progresses, making the building dynamic as it glows in different hues like a large punctuated lantern.”

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

“The room levels are identified by a rectilinear white block that is punctuated by varying widths of vertical slit windows that cantilevers out over the level of the flyover, forming a wedge at the front corner that houses a suite at each level overlooking a school playground beyond the flyover across the road. The built form thus relates to its surroundings in terms of its planning and creates a distinct identity albeit its small size.

The hotel is entered through a 24′ high lobby with a wall of varied rectilinear composition of wood and glass that curves into the ceiling, slowly fragmenting into individual suspended glass cuboids, creating a sculptural effect. The small lobby space is perceived with openness by virtue of its volume and its extension into an open coffee shop that is segregated by low pink glass partitions.”

Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Restaurant, Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

“Suspended within this lobby volume, a wood wrapped corridor acts as an open bar overlooking the lobby while leading into a restaurant at the upper level. A glass punctuated floor with colour change lights echo the exterior wall composition in this open bar corridor with a linear glass bar counter.

Angled trapezoidal planes, punctuated with varied compositions, fold down from the ceiling to create two private dining areas within the restaurant space and fragment the volume into smaller spaces that are lent more privacy. The restaurant design thus creates compositions of form that are varied depending upon which part they are being perceived from.

Four levels of rooms house the 63 rooms, with each floor having a judicial mix of twin bed and double bed configurations, along with a suite and a themed room. The rooms thus offer a wide range of experiences. The suites are cantilevered out at the front corner of the building with floor to ceiling glass, each one designed differently. The rear corner has themed rooms that include a sports room, a quirky music room, a love room and a wellness room.”

Lobby, Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

Lobby, Chrome Hotel by Sanjay Puri Architects

to the Sanjay Puri Architects website

SOF Park Inn Hotel Complex by J. Mayer H.

SOF Park Inn Hotel, photo by Jakub Kaczmarczyk

October 8th 2009 marks the opening of SOF, the new Hotel Park Inn, Krakow, Poland designed by J. MAYER H. architects in collaboration with GD&K Consulting Sp. z o.o. and OVOTZ Design LAB.

SOF Park Inn Hotel by J. Mayer H.

SOF Park Inn Hotel, photo by Jakub Kaczmarczyk

“The hotel is being constructed in the city centre, at the intersection of important transport routes. The hotel is located in the vicinity of the planned Congress Centre as well as near to the Wawel Castel and the histrorical Jewish district. It offers splendid views onto the old city centre. The new porperty is characterized by clear horizontal line, picking out the panorama-view as a central theme. The Facade is emphasized by black and white aluminium stripes, seperated by dark glass windows.”

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland, photo by Jakub Kaczmarczyk

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland, photo by Jakub Kaczmarczyk

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland

SOF Park Inn Hotel Krakow / Poland, photo by Jakub Kaczmarczyk

Client: GD&K Consulting Sp. z o.oSOF Debniki Development Sp. z o.o.. (UBM + GD&K Group)

Project Date: 2005-09

Architects: J. MAYER H., GD&K Consulting Sp. z o.o., OVOTZ Design LAB

Project Team: Juergen Mayer H., MarcusBlum, Jan-Christoph Stockebrand, Wojciech Witek, Magdalena Skoplak-Seweryn, Jakub Kaczmarczyk

Photographer: Jakub Kaczmarczyk, Ovotz design Lab, www.ovotz.pl

to the J. Mayer H. website

'Snuggle' by raumlabor berlin

'Snuggle' by raumlaborberlin

Sleeping where you don´t want to be? In a cheap hotel? In the ikea funished guest appartment? On the sofa of a friends friend? raumlaborberlin has designed their own mobile dream hotel for workshops, group exhibitions, symposions and festivals. now we are waiting for the perfect investor.

A temporary hotel by raumlaborberlin

A mobile hotel by raumlaborberlin

‘Snuggle’ is a form of modular accomodation, made of a platform for the mattress, which is enclosed by willow meshwork and a weatherproof textile coat. Three identical platform elements belong to three variable, open or closed coverings. The nozzle of the open ones can either be window, entrance or tunnel to the next room. Every room has a separate entrance, which is individually closable. Sanitary facilities are located in central modules.

Construction

Construction

Snuggle’s modules hang on a framework – winding around the trees, the hotel’s network is adapted to the actual countryside. After having done its service at one place ‘Snuggle’ can easily be removed and rebuilt at another place.

'something between a fox-hole and a martin's blister', drawings by Florian Stirnemann

'something between a fox-hole and a martin's blister', drawings by Florian Stirnemann

to the raumlaborberlin website

to ‘Spacebuster’ by raumlaborberlin

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