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Posts tagged as 'holiday home'

Mon 21.7.

Holiday Home, Sarzeau by Atelier Raum (FR)

Posted by Walter Phillips on 21.07.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Holiday Home, Sarzeau by Raum, photo: © Audrey Cerdan

Holiday Home, Sarzeau by Atelier Raum, photo: © Audrey Cerdan

Located on the north coast of the Rhuys peninsula in the Bretagne région of northwestern France, Atelier Raum’s Holiday Home is situated at the edge of a lightly residential, wooded area overlooking the sea.

 

(more…)

The Watson House by John Pardey Architects; photo by James Morris

The RIBA-award-winning practice of John Pardey has realised this beautifully simple single-storey family house located within a tranquil setting of New Forest National Park, UK. Completed earlier last year (in 2010), the elegant, linear holiday house boasts an open-plan living area, four bedrooms as well as a dressing room and a study while the floor-to-ceiling windows flood the interior with natural light. (more…)

Chalet de vacances by Charles Pictet Architecte, photo by Thomas Jantscher

Chalets are a type of wooden houses in the Alpine region, traditionally with a sloping roof and widely overhanging eaves. The Geneva based architectural practice of Charles Pictet realised this modern chalet at Les Diablerets, a mountain range in the western Swiss Alpes.

(more…)

Thu 25.2.

House on Lake Okoboji by Min Day (USA)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 25.02.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

The San Francisco based architectural practice Min Day realised this residence on the shore of Lake Okoboji in rural Iowa. Surrounded by old cottages and new McMansions (an american term for large and representatice houses) this building is located on a rather small lot.

“Our strategy resulted in a deceptively simple footprint that minimized the size of the house on the site while allowing for a series of spatial frames within the house that focus on the view while excluding the neighbors. This allowed for a sense of total privacy within the house itself. Additionally, the lake itself is ringed by numerous oak trees which form beautiful a canopy around the lake, separating it from the corn fields”, the architects explain.

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

“Volumetrically simple from the exterior, opaque and slatted vertical Ipe clads a stacked set of spatial tubes (the primary living spaces) that are open to the lake and woods views, but visually closed to neighbors on the sides. We formed the house’s spatial tubes around view axes running through the site, perceptually linking the lake through the forest to the fields beyond. These view-framing tubes are literal voids in the mass of the house bounded at their ends only by glass. Light and air also enters these rooms through operable windows set behind the slatted Ipe cladding. Dense service spaces (“program solids”) fill the remaining volume. The first level is dominated by continuous subtly amorphous space that opens to the exterior in with lake views in several directions. This space bounds the primary living spaces while suggesting connections and extensions to the surrounding landscape, lake and sky.”

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

“In contrast to the spatial tubes of the public areas, the smaller private spaces (bedrooms and bathrooms) are treated with a pronounced sense of interiority. As spaces become increasingly intimate, the intensity of color increases as well. All interior surfaces in these rooms are subsumed by intense color to the extent that each feels like a zone of pure color. Here color becomes equivalent to the Lake that dominates the spatial tubes, providing and autonomous interiority in contrast to the site-oriented “tubes”. Color becomes an important tool of space making, an additional layer that can reinforce or contradict the other components of spatial geometry, intensifying the experience or adding complexity.”

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

House on Lake Okoboji, photo by Paul Crosby

to the Min Day profile @ Architonic

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

Together with CMA/Christian Müller Architects the Dutch practice SeARCH realised this holiday home close to the famous thermal baths of Vals in Switzerland. The interior was designed by Hella Jongerius, Aldo Bakker, Studio Makkink & Bey and others.

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

Here is what the architects say:

“Shouldn’t it be possible to conceal a house in an Alpine slope while still exploiting the wonderful views and allowing light to enter the building?

“Surprised that it was permissible to construct a pair of dwellings so close to the world famous thermal baths of Vals, the client seized the opportunity to develop the site, without disturbing the bath’s expansive views. The introduction of a central patio into the steep incline creates a large façade with considerable potential for window openings. The viewing angle from the building is slightly inclined, giving an even more dramatic view of the strikingly beautiful mountains on the opposite side of the narrow valley.”

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

“The Local Authority’s well intentioned caution, that unusual modern proposals were generally not favoured, proved unfounded. The planners were pleased that the proposal did not appear ‘residential’ or impose on the adjacent baths building. The scheme was not perceived as a typical structure but rather an example of pragmatic unobtrusive development in a sensitive location. The placing of the entrance via an old Graubünder barn and an underground tunnel further convinced them that the concept, while slightly absurd, could still be permitted.

Switzerland’s planning laws dictate that it is only possible to grant a definitive planning permission after a timber model of the building’s volume has first been constructed on site. This can then be accurately appraised by the local community and objected to if considered unsuitable. For this proposal, logic prevailed and this part of the process was deemed to be unnecessary.”

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

'Villa Vals' by SeARCH and CMA, photo by Iwan Baan

Architect: SeARCH and CMA

Design: Bjarne Mastenbroek and Christian Müller,

Assistants SeARCH: Louis Toebosch, Ton Gilissen, Laura Álvarez Rodríguez, Alexandra Schmitz w/ Michal Palej, Daniel Abraha, Markus Wesselmann

Assistants CMA: Blazej Kazmierski, David Strebicki


to the SeARCH website

to the CMA website

to the Iwan Baan website

to the Villa Vals website

Mountain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects

Mountain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects, photo by Patrick Reynolds

The Auckland-based Fearon Hay Architects realised this 100sqm-retreat which seems to be perfectly embedded into the dramatic landscape close to the shores of Lake Wakatipu, Central Otago / New Zealand.

Moutain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects, photo by Patrick Reynolds

Moutain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects, photo by Patrick Reynolds

Here is what the architects expain:

The region around the retreat’s site is also known as the Southern Lakes. It is an alpine environment formed by heavily glaciated schist mountainscapes and vegetated below the snow line with beech forest. Early European occupation of the region began in 1840 with explorers seeking to extend pastoral activities established in the gentler environments to the north and east of the Southern Alps. This occupation was intensified by the discovery of the Central Otago goldfields in the early 1860’s. Both forms of occupation constructed structures for shelter and utility with the stackable weathered schist readily available around the rivers and glaciated mountain slopes.

This retreat is designed for a young family who do not reside in New Zealand. It is intended to maximise the sense of living in the landscape and reference these early structures. The retreat is intended for use by varying numbers of people across all seasons.

Vie on the lake, photo by Patrick Raynolds

Vie on the lake, photo by Patrick Reynolds

The design is a simple arrangement of spaces within a predominantly open plan. A main sleeping space opens over the living space and is serviced by a centrally located bathroom. Sleeping accommodation is augmented by a bunkroom with double bunk, allowing accommodation for anything from a single adult up to two families with children. The overlap and combination of sleeping, living and bathing functions allows for flexibility of use, introducing variety and a certain complexity to the inhabitation of a small building.

Entry is gained from the roof with the building concealed from view when arriving at the site. Steel handrails and the flue of the fireplace are the only indications of the space below. Plan and section show the building to be a void removed from the mountain slope. The internal space is extended beyond the natural ground surface with a structure of reinforced concrete blanketed by gravel ballast over the roof and heavily rendered schist cladding to the walls.

Electrical power is provided to the remote location, however the retreat provides its own on site wastewater management and bottled gas energy source. Water is sourced from a nearby mountain stream, tank stored and UV filtered.

Living room, photo by Patrick Raynolds

Living room, photo by Patrick Reynolds

The external appearance of the building uses the heavily rendered stone to express a cubic form embedded in the side of the mountain amongst beech trees. The cave-like space is expressed as a horizontal void removed from this solid. Vertical supports have been avoided to enhance the sense of a slice of space removed from the hillside. A suspended log fire anchors the cantilevered corner and provides a hearth against the backdrop of beech trees and the lake when viewed from within.

The southwest oriented mountain slope was chosen for its position in the existing beech forest and available mountain and lake views, however this orientation poses a challenge for solar access in the alpine winter. The retreat is set into the surrounding rock and enclosed with floor to ceiling insulated glass units sliding in steel frames. The space is therefore insulated from the alpine climate, including the diurnal extremes of the Central Otago summer. Heavyweight construction provides significant thermal mass. The glazed elevations are further screened by the surrounding beech forest, filtering the summer light from the potentially intensive southwest orientation. Heating set within the insulated floor slab provides additional comfort when required in the extremes of winter.

Living room, photo by Patrick Raynolds

Living and bedroom, photo by Patrick Reynolds

The colours and textures of the cladding integrate the building into the gravel tracks, exposed rock faces and scree slopes of the alpine environment. The interior space is defined primarily by exposing and sandblasting the concrete slabs of the wall and floor structure. A polished plaster ceiling complements the exposed wall slabs to promote the sense of space carved out as a cave. This heavyweight construction is refined by the introduction of blackened steel sections and rough sawn cedar boards.

The architecture seeks to be a subtle insertion in the alpine landscape. The internal environment is both muscular and refined, referencing the toughness of the environment while providing comfort required for a retreat in the mountains.

Mountain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects

Mountain Retreat by Fearon Hay Architects, photo by Patrick Reynolds

to the Fearon Hay Architects website

to Patrick Reynolds’ website

Tue 22.9.

Mountain chalet Flumserberg by EM2N

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 22.09.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

Holiday home by EM2N

Holiday home by EM2N

This holiday home in the Swiss Alps was designed by the Zurich-based EM2N Architects. Externally the house varies the ubiquitous theme of the chalet with dark wood cladding and small window openings to create the image of a chalet tower with huge panorama windows.

Holiday home Flumserberg by EM2N, photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N

Holiday home Flumserberg by EM2N, photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N

Here in the architect’s words:

Most holiday houses look identical, i.e. like conventional single-family houses. The topography, character and quality of the location are seldom taken into account in the planning. The houses could just as well come from the catalogue of a company that supplies ready-made homes, their architectural expression is accordingly arbitrary. Our design refuses to accept colonising a place at this low level, it represents an approach that relates to the place and the wonderful site beside an alpine field that in summer is a meadow and in winter a ski run.

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

On the one hand the house rises vertically in order to capture the spectacular views on all sides, while on the other hand the alpine meadow around the building is left undisturbed. Apart from a gravel approach route there is no fence, no garden design that alters the appearance of the place.

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N

As an antithesis to living in separate rooms we developed our design from the hypothesis of a single-room house. There are not separate rooms but only vertical and horizontal zones, each of them fulfilling several functions.

Staircase, photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

Staircase, photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

Photo by Hannes Henz, courtesy of EM2N.

Principal Designer/s: EM2N / Mathias Mueller / Daniel Niggli

Design Team: Mathias Muller, Daniel Niggli, Christoph Rothenhofer

Contractor/s: Timberconstruction Engineers: Pirmin Jung Ingenieure fur Holzbau GmbH, Rain

Date of commencement of project: 2002

Date of completion of project: 2003

Location of site: Flumserberg, Tannenheim, Switzerland

Site Area: 630 sq. mt.

Built-up Area: 183 sq. mt, (Gross Floor Area), thereof 104 sq. mt. habitable

Cost of Construction/Execution: CHF 450000

to the EM2N website

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