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Posts tagged as 'Facades'

Wed 27.6.

Green Cast by Kengo Kuma and Associates (JP)

Posted by Malgorzata Stankiewicz on 27.06.2012 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

Green Cast by Kengo Kuma and Associates; photo by Daici Ano

Featuring a striking, rhythmic die-cast aluminium façade incorporating irregularly planted tufts of greenery, this five-storey building was completed last summer (2011) by the Tokyo-based practice Kengo Kuma and Associates. Aptly named ‘Green Cast’, the 1047-square-meters mixed-use building comprises a basement and ground-floor parking space, a clinic and a pharmacy, an office area, a vocational school as well as a two-bedroom rooftop residence. (more…)

Tue 1.3.

‘The Orange Cube’ by Jakob + MacFarlane (FR)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 01.03.2011 - Tagged as: , , ,

'The Orange Cube' by Jakob + MacFarlane, photo by Nicolas Borel photographer

The Paris based practice Jakob + MacFarlane recently unveiled this new office building in Lyon. ‘The Orange Cube’ is part of a comprehensive urban planning project for the old harbor zone. The 5-storeyed complex consists of a regular concrete framework, cladded with a perforated, patterned facade. A giant hole carved into the simple ortogonal cube responds to the necessities of light, air movement and views.

(more…)

'Ceramics & Architecture' a this year's Dutch Design Week

'Ceramics & Architecture' a this year's Dutch Design Week

At this years Dutch Design Week in Eindhoven the .ekwc will showcase the result of their five-year project Ceramics & Architecture, that consists of the projects ‘Brick’ and ‘Combined Residencies’. It is the biggest exhibition in .ekwc’s history, where 75 architects, designers and visual artists present their works. The publication shows the overall picture of all works made by the participants of Ceramics & Architecture.

'Between Bricks' by Baukje Trenning, photo by Ruud Peijnenburg

'Between Bricks' by Baukje Trenning, photo by Ruud Peijnenburg

Brick

In the Brick project architects, designers and visual artists from The Netherlands and abroad have been asked to develop a new type of brick or come up with a new use for existing bricks. The results are as diverse as the participants themselves. They testify to intensive form research, the search for new functionality of the brick as well as an artistic approach to the material.

Brick - exhibition 3, photo by Ruud Peijnenburg

Brick - exhibition 3, photo by Ruud Peijnenburg

Combined Residencies

The project ‘Combined residencies’ focuses on a change in mentality: to demonstrate that cooperation between architects, visual artists and designers at as early a stage as possible, benefits the interactive, creative process. The results are innovative and surprising. Wienerberger, .ekwc’s partner in developing the project, has researched and manufactured some of the results of Brick and Combined Residencies.

'Combined residencies': 'Penrose 2' by David Celento en Del Harrow

'Combined residencies': 'Penrose 2' by David Celento en Del Harrow

Ceramics & Architecture, 17 / 25 october, Hal 2 Klokgebouw Strijp S and TU Eindhoven

to the .ekwc website

Thu 8.10.

‘Frog Queen’ in Graz / Austria by SPLITTERWERK

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 08.10.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Flog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, phot by Paul Ott

Icons 'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Paul Ott

With ‘Frog Queen’ SPLITTERWERK once more demonstrates their preference for visually effective surfaces and spatial experiences created by large scale images, textures and patterns they apply on architecture.

The Graz-based design collective was commissioned to design this headquarters building for PRISMA Engineering, a machine and motor technology company also located in Graz. The objective was to design a structure which could house the company’s various research and development programs, and selectively showcase the work to a varied range of often competing clientele. Thus the building design needed to accommodate both highend testing and presentation without jeopardizing the security and secrecy with which the work is developed.

'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Paul Ott

'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Paul Ott

Here is what the architects explain:

“The building form approximates a cube, measuring 18.125 x 18.125 x 17m, wrapped on all four elevations with a pixilated pattern of square panels. From a distance, these panels appear to be painted in a range of ten values of grey tone, together dematerializing the volume of the building against both the trees of the surrounding site and the clouds and sky. Thus the cubic building is at once monumental in its objecthood in the open landscape – scale-less and immaterial – and yet utterly non-iconographic in its overall form.”

Lobby 'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Paul Ott

Lobby 'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Paul Ott

“As is characteristic of their work, SPLITTERWERK was interested in developing a play between pictorial image and spatial experience. Working with the effects of dimension, distance, and time, the building’s skin was designed to generate shifting perceptions of the volume and texture. As one approaches the building, the cubic proportions of the volume become apparent, as does the finer grain of surface articulation on each panel, comprised not of a single grey tone but rather a tight grid of abstract pictorial figures. These figures might be interpreted as flowers, speaking to the surrounding fields, or gear wheels, suggestive of the highly secretive work happening inside the building. Each façade panel is itself nearly square, measuring 67 x 71.5-cm, and made of powder-coated aluminum, screen-printed with the various images. Integrated within this field of figures, deployed at the scale of both panel and building, windows and doors are similarly considered such that they essentially disappear within the composition of the façade.”

Interior with photo wallpaper, photo by Nikolaos Zachariadis

Interior with photo wallpaper, photo by Nikolaos Zachariadis

“At the interior, individual office spaces are wallpapered with images of the surrounding Eastern Styrian landscape, creating a conceptual tension between the interior of the building envelope (narrative and pictorial) and the visual effects of its exterior panels (abstract and spatial). In this sense, the decorative strategy for both interior and exterior is conceived with certain landscape sensibilities in mind; a visual context which is simultaneously pictorial in its framed references and affective in the atmosphere it produces.” (Text by Ben Pell)

'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Nikolaos Zachariadis

'Frog Queen' by SPLITTERWERK, photo by Nikolaos Zachariadis

Location: Graz, Steiermark, Austria

Projectteam: Irene Berto, Mark Blaschitz, Erika Brunnermayer, Marius

Ellwanger, Hannes Freiszmuth, Johann Grabner, Edith Hemmrich, Ute Himmelberg, Bernhard

Kargl, Benjamin Nejedly, Josef Roschitz, Maik Rost, Ingrid Somitsch, Nikolaos Zachariadis

Client: PRISMA Engineering Maschinen- und Motorentechnik GmbH, Dipl.-Ing.

Ernst Gschweitl

User: PRISMA Engineering Maschinen- und Motorentechnik GmbH

Project management: Ingenos ZT GmbH

Structural consultant: werkraum zt-gmbh, Peter Bauer, David Lemp

Building services consultant: Ing. Rudolf Sonnek GmbH

HVACR design: Guenter Grabner

Energy consultant: Dr. Tomberger ZT GesmbH, Hannes Veitsberger

Electrical design: Erich Watzke, Moskon & Busz GmbH, Rudolf Busz

to the SPLITTERWERK website

Q-House in Spain by asensio_mah

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 08.10.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

In May this year the Spanish architects asensio_mah unveiled this single family residence in the North of Spain. The façade consists of customized dark “composite” panels which have different surface consistencies and textures.

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

But let the architects explain it better:

“The house is a conscious exercise in developing an alternative domestic environment to the surrounding villas of the new suburban neighborhood. The solutions for the development so far have typically been compact villas located on abruptly leveled gardens, irrespective of the complex topographical condition of their sites. Our ambition for producing an alternative domestic atmosphere is developed by constructing a more explicit relationship between the house and garden with the existing conditions of the steep site. This organizational strategy for the house sought to register the difference in topography within the parcel by organizing a series of terraces that configure the framework for a landscape with differentiated characters.”

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

“This deliberate geometric configuration affords multiple readings of the outline of the house while facilitating a rich experiential lifestyle within its volume and landscape. Specific organizational and material strategies were developed to produce different volumetric and perceptual readings that change with the different vantage points towards and within the house.”

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

“The building is organized in three bands that are arranged around a central circulation core. These three bands maintain a prevailing orientation in the northeast-southwest direction to secure maximum daylight in every room. While the bands configure and organize the different rooms, the circulation core underpins a switchback pattern of shifting orientations with the gradual vertical movement through the house.”

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

“The house is clad in dark “composite” panels that have been customized with digital fabrication techniques. These customized panels are used to articulate sections of the house volume in order to introduce legibility to the overall form. These panels offer a range of different surface consistencies and patterns to the house that reflect the sites changing light conditions in multiple ways, producing an ever changing range of texture and tones.”

Q-House by asensio_mah

Q-House by asensio_mah, photo by Ricardo Loureiro

Location: North of Spain

Completion date: May 2009

Detail design: in collaboration with J.M. Aguirre Aldaz

Site supervision: in collaboration with Satie Arquitectos S.L.

Structure: Egitur S.L

Photography: Ricardo Loureiro

Team credits: Diego Repiso, Jennifer Chuong, Kaizen Chen, Jon Aguirre.

to the asensio_mah website

to the Ricardo Loureiro website

Fri 2.10.

Media Façade: A new form of art in architecture

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 02.10.2009 - Tagged as: ,

Mechanical Media Surface, photo: decoi

Mechanical Media Surface, photo: decoi

The term Media Facade is often associated with over-dimensional screens and animated, illuminated advertising, and places like Times Square, the Strip in Las Vegas and Hong Kong are trailblazers for this media architecture. The façade itself is dematerialized and turned into one huge advertising medium for sending messages. At the onset of dusk the building moves into the background and serves only as a backdrop for the light show which then becomes the main attraction. Media facades can evoke the most diverse emotions, from a big city feeling to annoyance at light pollution. They are also seen as tourist attractions, Pop Art or as eye sores.
Architecture tends to use media facades more and more as a stylistic feature. What used to be applied to facades after construction more in the way of a blemish is now part of the planning process and offers new scope for visionary design which coined the term ‘Mediatecture’.
Here we are will introduce the most significant ideas, projects and products.

Inside the Media Surface, photo: decoi

Inside the Media Surface, photo: decoi

Mechanical Media Surface
Screens and lighting elements generally offer a change of the three dimensional perception of an immobile object. The first known interactive media surface was, however, made up of a mechanical display and was the result of the work of a team of architects, engineers, mathematicians and programmers. It is precisely this spatial change that creates different surface images which makes the ‘Aegis Hyposurface’ so revolutionary. The display has been constructed using reflecting metal plates that are moved pneumatically and react in ‘real-time’ to electronic input. Sensors transfer impulses from the surroundings of the display and these are transmitted to a matrix of rotors to which the metal plates are attached. The movements of the spectators are transferred in ‘real-time’ to the display and transferred in exact detail into expressive, naturally looking flowing movements.

Prototype, photo: decoi

Prototype, photo: decoi

continue article @ Architonic

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