Posts tagged as 'extension'

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

The German engineers Brückner & Brückner realised the extension of this after several architectural modifications quiet heterogeneous power station in Würzburg, south of Germany. Therefore one important aim was to connect the different structures to a consistent complex.

The new facade consists of bicoloured metal profiles of different dimensions which are applied in varying rhythm.

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

Extension of a power station by Brückner & Brückner Ingenieure, photo by Constantin Meyer

to the Brückner & Brückner profile @ Architonic

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

In collaboration with Scheitlin&Syfrig Architekten the Zurich based Stefan Zwicky Architekten designed the conversion of a former riding arena in order to integrate it into the existing Credit Suisse Communications Center.

The building offers space for a ballroom, a restaurant, a foyer, offices, seminar rooms and the necessary facilities such as kitchen, toilets, and staff rooms.

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

to the Stefan Zwicky Architekten profile @ Architonic


haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)


haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

The Frankfurt/Main based architectural practice reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure) realised this extension of an existing single family house with the aim to create a “four generation residence”.

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)


haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)


haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)


haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

haus jones by reinhardt_jung (architekten und ingenieure)

to the reinhardt_jung [architekten und ingenieure] profile @ Architonic

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

The Belgian practice dmvA Architecten realised this extension of an existing row house in Mechelen, Belgium.

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

Here is what the architects explain:

Central void – glass floors

“Following a new addition of the family, the owners decided to rebuild their house.

The existing house was extended according to building regulations, 17 m groundfloor, 13 m first floor and 9 m saddle-roof.

Responding to the light problem on the groundfloor, a central void was created, cutting three floors, so light could enter the house via the huge dormer window.

In order not to lose space, the void was filled in with glass floors. This light-shaft organises and connects all different living-functions.”

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

Open house - own space

“The concept of the central void with glass floors also bears an educational aspect.

By means of the glass floors, a spatial transparency is created through which all spaces are connected. Children are brought up with the emphasis on ‘living together’, one of the main principals in education.

At the same time everyone has the disposal of his own space.”

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

Street – garden, closed- open, dark- light, strict –sculptural

“The façade on street side is in every inch the opposite of the back façade.

The design of the front is the result of the search for sunscreen, privacy, closeness, urbanism. Characteristic to the front façade is not only verticalism, but also the contemporary translation of roller-blinds, so often used in the past.

The back façade, on the contrary, is open, clear, white with large windows.

The design-language applied gives this façade a sculptural character.”

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House Schuurmans by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

House S by dmvA Architecten, photo by Frederik Vercruysse

to the dmvA Achitecten website

Tayson House by Kras Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kras Schönberg Architects, photos by Kraus Schönberg

The Constance and London based Kraus Schönberg Architects realised this new built extension of a Victorian warehouse building in ‘Little Germany’, a particular historical area in in central Bradford, West Yorkshire.

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Here is what the architects expalin:

“The formation of Bradford’s Little Germany took place in various stages. This can be seen in the different sizes of the warehouses.

Starting with two to three storey buildings in the early 1830s, the trend changed towards grander structures in the late 1850s. Tayson House was built around 1870 and it’s four floors have a two storey neighbour.”

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

“The new infill structure tries to mediate between the two historical buildings, making a clear statement in its own time – the present.

The new extension is hung from a steel frame creating a minimal interface with the existing buildings. By creating its own architectural language the glass, galvanised steel and timber structure can be seen as a separate entity. This allows a continuation of the industrial character of Little Germany and helps regenerating the area.”

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

Tayson House by Kraus Schönberg Architects

to the Kraus Schönberg Architects website

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

The Berlin based architects Kuehn Malvezzi realised this extension on top of an old factory building dating back to the beginning of the last century. Extending over 4,500 square metres, this listed building had over the years housed various kinds of productive activity, from theatre sets to female corsetry. Since Kuhn Mavezzi’s modification the loft is today Julia Stoschek’s house-museum.

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

Here is what the architects explain:

“Planning restrictions established by the heritage authorities dictated two radical decisions: to maintain the facade and openings of the original layout, and gut out and reorganise the inside to suit the new brief. All the windows were renovated, but a new perimeter was built inside the external walls to create a space within a space, limiting the relationship with the outside to just a few well-defined situations. Meanwhile, on the outside, the colour chosen for the render neutralises the nostalgic effect of industrial architecture and the final result communicates the idea of a factory. The interior spaces are stacked up vertically, starting with a cinema space in the basement and culminating in a panoramic terrace situated at the top of a glass box placed on the factory roof, an element accepted by the heritage authority as a sign and logo of the museum and placed exactly in the area previously occupied by the factory sign.”

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

“The vertical organisation between the first and second floors is expressed with the breaking up of the slab in correspondence with the entrance that gives the visitor a glimpse of the whole exhibition route. On the third floor, which is 12 metres high, a block has been inserted that forms a fourth floor and a staircase that leads to the terrace, crowned by the glass box. The Stoschek collection is mostly made up of videos that the client has chosen to present to the public with themed exhibitions that change each year. The public exhibition spaces on the first and second floors have therefore been flexibly organised around the constants determined by the horizontal and vertical circulation. Visitors’ movements constitute the generating element for the layout of the exhibition spaces. Sound and silence alternate along the exhibition route; areas for watching videos are enclosed by soundproof walls while the soundless spaces in between create a break between one piece and another so that each can be fully appreciated. The exhibition space is built on the relationship between the visitor and the work, on the relationship between one piece and another. The 12-metre-high third/fourth floor is Julia Stoschek’s home and also a space for special events. This open-plan floor occupies the factory’s entire roof space, where structural elements have been left exposed. Inside, a kitchen is enclosed in a cube and the bedrooms and bathrooms in a vertical parallelepiped. Around these two elements the house becomes a large exhibition space, where pieces of furniture and works of art come together to create a complete installation.”

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

“The size of this space determined the choice of a small number of furnishings with giant proportions; the six-metre-long table and outsize sofa contrast with the original chairs from the 1950s and ‘60s. The existing roof structure where the glass box has been inserted is made abstract and neutral by the use of white while the floor is dark grey. The same colours and materials have been used in the exhibition spaces on the lower floors, homogenising the public and private areas.”

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi

Julia Stoschek Collection by Kuehn Malvezzi, photo by Ulrich Schwarz

Design team: Johannes Kuehn, Wilfried Kuehn, Simona Malvezzi, Jan Ulmer, Michael Stoss, Roland Zueger, Vincent Rahm

to the Kuehn Malvezzi website

more architect’s profiles @ Architonic

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

The German practice kadawittfeldarchitektur realised this prefabricated loft – based on a wooden frame construction – on top of an existing single family house in Aachen / Germany in 2007. The gladding is made from larch wood without any kind of paintwork – the silvery gray discoulouration of the wood is specifically desired.

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

Here is what the architects explain:

“Loft L is located in the south of Aachen within a mixed context of detached 1-3 story dwellings and single-family homes. The building extension consists of prefabricated timber framework elements placed on top of an existing house from the late 50s. The specific shape was generated according to zoning constraints existing on site. The extension has generated additional living space, a “parent floor” for a young pair with two children. The project and its construction was featured on local TV, and with its unique shape, selection of materials, and the new “view” created, the building can be seen as a role model for similar rooftop extensions.”

Detail, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

Detail, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur, photo by Angelo Kaunat

Mounting, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitekten

Mounting, 'Loft L' by kadawittfeldarchitektur

Project Management: Dipl.Ing. Daniel Trappen

Location: Aachen (DE)

Construction Volume: GFA 68 m², cubature 190 m³

Realization: 2007

to the kadawittfeldarchitektur website

Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects

Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects, photo by Torben Eskerod

Earlier this year the Danish Dorte Mandrup Architects realised the extension of the Bordings Independent School close to the beautiful lakes of Østerbro in Copenhagen.

View from the school yard

View from the school yard, photo by Torben Eskerod

Here is what the architects explain:

The site and surroundings
The existing buildings of Bordings Independent School are beautifully situated by the lakes in Copenhagen. The main building is set back from the road, and the façade towards the lakes is primarily shaped by the new building, the gym and the gates toward the two courts of the school.
The school is situated between two urban structures, the traditional block-structure with 4-5 storey buildings and the close and intimate structure of the row houses “Kartoffelrækkerne”.
The façade facing the lakes is characterized by the alternation between the block structure and the row house structure, the expression is diverse and green.

Extension of the Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects, photo by Torben Eskerod

Extension of the Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects, photo by Torben Eskerod

Architectural main-idea
The urban main idea is to create a building that expresses the transition between the larger scale of the block-structure and the smaller and more intimate scale of the row houses. Despite the site’s location in the extension of the traditional block and to emphasize the transition to a smaller scale, the building is located as a separate element between the two scale steps.
Through a shift in the main volume of the façade, the building is cut away from the existing building, and thereby is perceived as a separated yet harmonious part of the façade as a whole.

The composition of the new building is sculptural as opposed to the surface composition of the block to enhance the depth in the transition from the street façade to the school courtyard behind.

The new building is formed to ensure a large degree of flexibility, so the use of the inner spaces can change over time.

The building consists of three elements: the imprint into the ground, the volume and the screen

The imprint

An area larger than the footprint of the building is excavated creating a courtyard-area below the existing courtyard. This opens the lower façade to the light, and creates an extra outer space in relation to the basement.

Façade made of perforated Corten Steel, photo by Torben Eskerod

Façade made of perforated Corten Steel, photo by Torben Eskerod

The Volume

The concrete slabs are carried by the facades parallel to the existing neighbouring building. This creates a maximum of flexibility without carrying pillars or dividing walls. Towards east and west the facades are fully glazed for a maximum of light transmission. The carrying facades are done in recycled bricks from the building that was demolished from the site. The tradition of the pupils being allowed to do an inscription in a brick is thereby carried on into the new building and the future of the school.

The Screen

The screen is done in perforated Corten Steel. It is folded around the corner and the new balcony to create a façade parallel to the façade of the existing gym. The difference between the façade line and the rectangle of the volume creates a depth in the façade that diffuses and brings warmth to the light before entering the building. The screen thus works as a sunscreen as well as a visual screen towards the street. Finally cuts in the screen frames specific views towards the lake.

Basement, Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects, photo by Torben Eskerod

Basement, Bordings Independent School by Dorte Mandrup Architects, photo by Torben Eskerod

Entry

The building is entered from the big excavated staircase towards east and from the two steel staircases towards east and west.

The Basement

The basement houses the music classes for amplified music, a small recording studio and storage. The music classroom can be opened through a large sliding door towards the outside space and the large staircase that can serve as seating for an audience on summer nights.

Ground Floor

The ground floor consists of one large room serving primarily as classroom for music classes for acoustical instruments and at the same time as a gathering hall for the daily gatherings and special events for the whole school. Toilet, wardrobe and storage are placed in a zone towards the existing neighbouring building.

First Floor

The first floor also consists of one room for the art and crafts classes. In the corner, and in open connection to the primary room, large sinks and steel tables are placed in a niche. The storage zone is again placed towards the existing neighbour.

Materials and construction

The house is built as a simple concrete structure with an outer brick façade in recycled bricks. The screen is done in perforated corten steel sheets. Both materials patinate beautifully and need no maintenance.

The facades are done in oil treated hardwood frames with outside mullions of painted aluminium.

The basements walls inside and out are done in on-site cast concrete. The upper staircases are done in painted steel. The floors are done in linoleum.

to the Dorte Mandrup Architects website