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Posts tagged as 'Ecker Architekten'

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

German Ecker Architects hosted a studio of 12 Design-Build students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago this summer. With the kind support of craftsmen, volunteer workers and townspeople of the Odenwald/Bauland, a rural region in central Germany, the students realised this chapel for a local ecumenical church co-operative. It was completetd within eight weeks. For some of the students this projects it was the first experience in practical construction.

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Dea Ecker and her old friend Professor Flury from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago had the idea for this collaboration after the local Reverend Moser-Feesche contacted Ecker Architekten with the intent to build a chapel – even though he had no funding, held no property, and did not have the support of his congregation.

Field Chapel by students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago

Field Chapel by students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago

“In January 2009 Professor Flury introduced the project to the Design-Build curriculum and received an enthusiastic response. Over the next 3 months, 12 students developed three design alternatives. In March 2009, these projects were personally presented to the governing municipality of Buchen and the citizens of Boedigheim. After a lengthy discussions two projects were chosen for further development, with Prof. Flury ultimately responsible for the feasibility of a final proposal. Armed with a donation of lumber from the city of Buchen, the “Professor from Chicago” and the “Reverend with an idea” asked for the trust and help of the townspeople to realize the project. With commitments from the local blacksmith, carpenter, sawmill owner, and the farmer (whose field the chapel was to be built upon), the town of Boedigheim agreed to implement the project.”

The chapel was constructed by the students with the support of local craftsmen

The chapel was constructed by the students with the support of local craftsmen

“The student group arrived in Germany during the first week of June. Despite an unusually rainy summer, the project progressed smoothly. With the help of countless volunteers, the chapel was constructed in just 8 weeks. Over 400 people witnessed the official benediction on 25 July, 2009.

Fabrication

From the onset of the project development, assembly details were designed to ensure the chapel could be completed by students without construction skills.

The entire wooden structure was cut on a CNC machine according to the student’s drawings. The receiving slots in the four main columns of the tower for the louvers were subsequently hand routed. Not a single plank was sawn on site. The students developed the drawings in various CAD programs and produced the individual components with hand tools and computer-assisted machinery.

The chapel design was based upon utilizing donated, renewable and local materials.”

Benediction of the chapel

Benediction of the chapel

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

to the Field Chapel website

to the Ecker Architekten website

to the Illinois Institute of Technology College of Architecture website

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Neckar-Odenwald County entrusted the local Ecker Architkten with the realisation of a new quickly and economical to built Kindergarten for children with physical or developmental handicaps.

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Here is what the architects explain:

“Four repetitive modules form the building. Each of these units contains two group classrooms and a small therapy room. Large roof overhangs shade group rooms in the summer months and allow outdoor play on exterior terraces in poor weather.

The units are radially distributed about an atrium- the largest single space in the school. This flexible meeting room serves as a circulation zone, an indoor playing field, a communal dining hall, and the place where each child begins and ends his or her school day. The size of the atrium also permits joint group activities and celebrations, fulfilling a vital part of the school’s educational mission first thought beyond the budget of the project.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

“This center is naturally illuminated and ventilated by four prominent roof monitors – the so-called ‘jester’s cap’. Opening lower vents in the classroom façade and the window flaps mounted at the top each monitor naturally draws air through the entire building, providing cooling during warmer days or when the atrium is densely populated. The monitors form the visual identity of the kindergarten, which has a strong presence despite sprawling, commercial surroundings. The cladding of these elements in gold-anodized aluminum roofing creates an important point of pride for the children who are schooled here.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

“The entire building was executed in wood frame construction, with glue-laminated timber columns and beams. Connection reveals in the timbers, designed to accept aluminum curtain wall profiles, were milled with a CNC wood router in the carpenter’s shop to ensure precision on the construction site. The nearly identical building modules enabled factory production of large framed panels, resulting in an extremely economical and fast erection – the entire construction period for this building, from groundbreaking to ribbon-cutting, totaled 8 months. Exterior walls are clad with robust clapboards, and wood products play a dominant role in the interior build-out. The color concept reinforces the radial form of the building and assists in the spatial orientation of the young user group.”

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Technical Information:

Wood frame construction, supporting framework from construction-grade full-timber and glue-laminated timber.

Wall and ceiling insulation with blown-in Loose-fill dry cellulose.

Interior finishes: Visible glue-laminated beams and columns, general wall sufaces are built from OSB (oriented strand-board) and „Fermacell“ (a gypsum and wood-fiber drywalling)- painted. Rubber base at floors. Linoleum flooring is used throughout the building.

Custom built-in cabinetry from MDF with plastic laminate surfacing.

Solid-core doors with opalescent plastic laminate surfacing and solid wood edging.

Stainless steel door hardware – Jasper Morrison’s 1144 Series for FSB.

Custom childrens’ tables are built from solid oak surfaced with desk-top linoleum.

Hung ceilings (interior and exterior) are Heraklith, a Magnesite-cement and wood-fiber acoustic panel.

Exterior Finsihes: Wood Clapboards, painted; the protection of the laminated timber construction on the exterior is provided by Aluminium roof edging and window cladding. The ‘jester’s cap’ is clad with a standing-seam gold-anodized aluminum rain-screen.

The overhangs above every terrace provide the building with an ‚intelligent’ solar shading in the summer months and allow a ‚solar gain’ in the winter.

Ventilation flaps in the aluminium curtain wall façade allow a continuous, controlled stream of fresh air into the building. Excess warmth is ventilated through a ‘thermal chimney’ at the highest point of the building, the ‘jester’s cap’ above the atrium. Even during construction in the hot summer of 2006, the climatic concept produced a comfortable interior environment without the aid of mechanical cooling.

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

'Dandelion Clock' by Ecker Architekten, photo by Constantin Meyer

Client: Neckar-Odenwald County, represented by County Executive Dr. Achim Brötel

Architect and General Contractor: Ecker Architekten

Structural Engineering: Färber + Hollerbach

Environmental Enginnering: Ingenieurbüro Willhaug

Carpentry: Zimmerei Bechtold, Roigheim

to the Ecker Architekten website

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