Posts tagged as 'Dominic Lutyens'

A sinuous, fragmented display system is the focal point of Neil Barrett’s monochromatic, Zaha Hadid-designed fashion boutiques in Seoul and Hong Kong

A sinuous, fragmented display system is the focal point of Neil Barrett’s monochromatic, Zaha Hadid-designed fashion boutiques in Seoul and Hong Kong

It may sound paradoxical, but corporate store architecture today strives to be as individualistic as possible. This is partly due to necessity. Like many booksellers, high-end fashion labels are fending off fierce competition from online retailers. They hope that investing in new, ultra-contemporary stores with a unique identity will wow their customers. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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With its apertures connecting different floors, Isay Weinfeld’s Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo anticipated the trend for more transparent interiors in bookshops that’s now increasingly common

With its apertures connecting different floors, Isay Weinfeld’s Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo anticipated the trend for more transparent interiors in bookshops that’s now increasingly common

In the retail world, bookstore interiors are arguably changing more radically than in any other sector. Time was when bookshops appealed for being old-world and fusty, with their labyrinthine layouts, faintly musty smells and eccentrically bookish proprietors. One example might be Paris’s Shakespeare and Company bookshop, founded by Sylvia Beach in 1919. Fast-forward to the 1990s, and bookshops had become megastores incorporating cafés and comfortable leather armchairs where customers could browse for hours and sip cappuccinos. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Haugen Zohar’s tent-like structure enclosing a fireplace. Its porous walls – made of recycled wood pieces arranged in ever-diminishing, concentric circles as they rise up the roof — glow at night; photo: Jason Havneraas

Haugen Zohar’s tent-like structure enclosing a fireplace. Its porous walls – made of recycled wood pieces arranged in ever-diminishing, concentric circles as they rise up the roof — glow at night; photo: Jason Havneraas

Fireplaces were once essential: from prehistoric times to the 19th-century, a home’s hearth provided light, heat and a means with which to cook. Today, you might think they were superfluous, obsolete in this age of centrally heated buildings. Yet our desire for fireplaces has never been entirely extinguished. Ironically, if they were once primarily functional, they’re now widely considered an unnecessary yet romantic luxury. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Tue 21.10.

A Glass Act: Fabbian’s Architectural Adventure

Posted by Walter Phillips on 21.10.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

To celebrate the launch of its innovative new glass product Laminis, Fabbian was inspired to photograph it within the subterranean stone quarry of Cava Acque in the Berici Hills near Grancona, in the province of Vicenza. This wasn’t some capricious idea. The legendary quarry is traditionally favoured by contemporary architects from Frank Gehry to Ricardo Bofill, and since Laminis was conceived for use in architectural projects, this setting felt entirely appropriate. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Fri 26.9.

Gloriously Glossy: The Versatile Tile Adorns the Coolest Interiors

Posted by Walter Phillips on 26.09.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Given the huge vogue for cladding buildings in ceramic tiles, we shouldn’t be surprised to hear that they are now fast infiltrating interiors too. It’s not hard to see why. People find glazed ceramic tiles appealing because of their seductive qualities – their lusciously lustrous surfaces and, if patterned, their potential for being stunningly decorative. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Joho Architecture deployed bricks to create the sculptural, organic form of its Curving House in South Korea. The architects compare it to the shape of a fish

Joho Architecture deployed bricks to create the sculptural, organic form of its Curving House in South Korea. The architects compare it to the shape of a fish

Bricks in contemporary architecture may well be saddled with a reputation for retrograde traditionalism – after all, the oldest discovered bricks date from before 7500 BC. For some, they conhure up images of architecturally unimaginative housing estates, but today, many forward-looking architects can’t get enough of the humble brick. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Mon 17.2.

Lean On Me: wall-supported furniture and lighting

Posted by Walter Phillips on 17.02.2014 - Tagged as:

Daphna Laurens’s ‘Cirkel’ floor lamp is part of an eponymous collection designed for Paris’s Galerie Gosserez. Laurens imagines it, in anthropomorphic terms, penetrating the wall and looking on to the other side

Daphna Laurens’s ‘Cirkel’ floor lamp is part of an eponymous collection designed for Paris’s Galerie Gosserez. Laurens imagines it, in anthropomorphic terms, penetrating the wall and looking on to the other side

We all need a little support sometimes. Behind the growing trend in furniture and lighting for wall-leaning or wall-mounted designs is a diversity of factors, among them the practical, the social and the aesthetic. Architonic gets up close and personal. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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The windows of Room Room, a house in Tokyo designed by Takeshi Hosaka, allow its owners, a deaf couple, to sign to their children through them – and give the building a feeling of permeability; photos Koji Fujii / Nacasa & Partners

The windows of Room Room, a house in Tokyo designed by Takeshi Hosaka, allow its owners, a deaf couple, to sign to their children through them – and give the building a feeling of permeability; photos Koji Fujii / Nacasa & Partners

Beyond their utilitarian function, windows and doors set up an emotional expectation on the part of visitors as to what they’ll encounter within a building, while, at the same time, negotiating the relation that users inside have with the exterior world. Little wonder that so many architects are engaged in a perennial experimentation with these fundamental structural elements. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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