Posts tagged as 'Dominic Lutyens'

Mon 18.5.

Architexture: textiles go constructional

Posted by Walter Phillips on 18.05.2015 - Tagged as: ,

Constructed in just eight months, GMP Architekten and Nüssli International’s show-stopping 25,000-seater Baku Crystal Hall in Azerbaijan features an angular facade made of reflective PVC-PES mesh fabric and PVC-coated polyester

Constructed in just eight months, GMP Architekten and Nüssli International’s show-stopping 25,000-seater Baku Crystal Hall in Azerbaijan features an angular facade made of reflective PVC-PES mesh fabric and PVC-coated polyester

Its roots may lie in transient structures, but contemporary textile architecture, with all its creative, functional and ecological possibilities, is definitely here to stay. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Delhi III table lamp by Pletz

Delhi III table lamp by Pletz

Brooklyn is only a short distance from Manhattan yet it has its own, highly distinctive identity. Talk to Brooklyn’s tight-knit but burgeoning community of designer-makers and you get the impression that this New York borough is widely seen as more romantic, bohemian, less overtly worldly than the more commerce-focused Manhattan. Yet it’s also easy to exaggerate the differences between these two creative hubs. After all, Brooklyn’s new generation of designers are, in their own way, highly ambitious and entrepreneurial. Even so, the ethos of their businesses is more leftfield, possibly more laid-back than those of Manhattan. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Mon 30.3.

Wild and wet: the new bathrooms getting in touch with nature

Posted by Walter Phillips on 30.03.2015 - Tagged as:

Studio Ton Ton’s Light+Light house in Indonesia is designed to be filled with light and to welcome nature indoors, as is driven home by a guava tree growing in the centre of the bathroom

Studio Ton Ton’s Light+Light house in Indonesia is designed to be filled with light and to welcome nature indoors, as is driven home by a guava tree growing in the centre of the bathroom

It’s a long time since bathrooms were regarded as purely functionalist, private spaces for performing perfunctory, daily ablutions. For the past 20 years or so, they’ve been elevated to a potentially communal space people choose to linger in. Take clean-lined, open-plan wet rooms — redolent of hammams and, free of clunky shower screens and trays, appealingly spacious —which are still in vogue today. Or the freestanding bath positioned mid-bedroom, though this looks dated now. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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A sinuous, fragmented display system is the focal point of Neil Barrett’s monochromatic, Zaha Hadid-designed fashion boutiques in Seoul and Hong Kong

A sinuous, fragmented display system is the focal point of Neil Barrett’s monochromatic, Zaha Hadid-designed fashion boutiques in Seoul and Hong Kong

It may sound paradoxical, but corporate store architecture today strives to be as individualistic as possible. This is partly due to necessity. Like many booksellers, high-end fashion labels are fending off fierce competition from online retailers. They hope that investing in new, ultra-contemporary stores with a unique identity will wow their customers. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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With its apertures connecting different floors, Isay Weinfeld’s Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo anticipated the trend for more transparent interiors in bookshops that’s now increasingly common

With its apertures connecting different floors, Isay Weinfeld’s Livraria da Vila bookstore in São Paulo anticipated the trend for more transparent interiors in bookshops that’s now increasingly common

In the retail world, bookstore interiors are arguably changing more radically than in any other sector. Time was when bookshops appealed for being old-world and fusty, with their labyrinthine layouts, faintly musty smells and eccentrically bookish proprietors. One example might be Paris’s Shakespeare and Company bookshop, founded by Sylvia Beach in 1919. Fast-forward to the 1990s, and bookshops had become megastores incorporating cafés and comfortable leather armchairs where customers could browse for hours and sip cappuccinos. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Haugen Zohar’s tent-like structure enclosing a fireplace. Its porous walls – made of recycled wood pieces arranged in ever-diminishing, concentric circles as they rise up the roof — glow at night; photo: Jason Havneraas

Haugen Zohar’s tent-like structure enclosing a fireplace. Its porous walls – made of recycled wood pieces arranged in ever-diminishing, concentric circles as they rise up the roof — glow at night; photo: Jason Havneraas

Fireplaces were once essential: from prehistoric times to the 19th-century, a home’s hearth provided light, heat and a means with which to cook. Today, you might think they were superfluous, obsolete in this age of centrally heated buildings. Yet our desire for fireplaces has never been entirely extinguished. Ironically, if they were once primarily functional, they’re now widely considered an unnecessary yet romantic luxury. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Tue 21.10.

A Glass Act: Fabbian’s Architectural Adventure

Posted by Walter Phillips on 21.10.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

To celebrate the launch of its innovative new glass product Laminis, Fabbian was inspired to photograph it within the subterranean stone quarry of Cava Acque in the Berici Hills near Grancona, in the province of Vicenza. This wasn’t some capricious idea. The legendary quarry is traditionally favoured by contemporary architects from Frank Gehry to Ricardo Bofill, and since Laminis was conceived for use in architectural projects, this setting felt entirely appropriate. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Fri 26.9.

Gloriously Glossy: The Versatile Tile Adorns the Coolest Interiors

Posted by Walter Phillips on 26.09.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Given the huge vogue for cladding buildings in ceramic tiles, we shouldn’t be surprised to hear that they are now fast infiltrating interiors too. It’s not hard to see why. People find glazed ceramic tiles appealing because of their seductive qualities – their lusciously lustrous surfaces and, if patterned, their potential for being stunningly decorative. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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