Posts tagged as 'Dominic Lutyens'

Tue 21.10.

A Glass Act: Fabbian’s Architectural Adventure

Posted by Walter Phillips on 21.10.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

Laminis can combine different clear or transparent tiles bearing an infinite variety of patterns — depending on the requirements and tastes of Fabbian’s clients — making it highly versatile

To celebrate the launch of its innovative new glass product Laminis, Fabbian was inspired to photograph it within the subterranean stone quarry of Cava Acque in the Berici Hills near Grancona, in the province of Vicenza. This wasn’t some capricious idea. The legendary quarry is traditionally favoured by contemporary architects from Frank Gehry to Ricardo Bofill, and since Laminis was conceived for use in architectural projects, this setting felt entirely appropriate. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Fri 26.9.

Gloriously Glossy: The Versatile Tile Adorns the Coolest Interiors

Posted by Walter Phillips on 26.09.2014 - Tagged as: ,

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Tiles in a calming green – suggestive of being underwater – were chosen to line the interior of skincare brand Aesop’s Berlin store, designed by Weiss-Heiten

Given the huge vogue for cladding buildings in ceramic tiles, we shouldn’t be surprised to hear that they are now fast infiltrating interiors too. It’s not hard to see why. People find glazed ceramic tiles appealing because of their seductive qualities – their lusciously lustrous surfaces and, if patterned, their potential for being stunningly decorative. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Joho Architecture deployed bricks to create the sculptural, organic form of its Curving House in South Korea. The architects compare it to the shape of a fish

Joho Architecture deployed bricks to create the sculptural, organic form of its Curving House in South Korea. The architects compare it to the shape of a fish

Bricks in contemporary architecture may well be saddled with a reputation for retrograde traditionalism – after all, the oldest discovered bricks date from before 7500 BC. For some, they conhure up images of architecturally unimaginative housing estates, but today, many forward-looking architects can’t get enough of the humble brick. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Mon 17.2.

Lean On Me: wall-supported furniture and lighting

Posted by Walter Phillips on 17.02.2014 - Tagged as:

Daphna Laurens’s ‘Cirkel’ floor lamp is part of an eponymous collection designed for Paris’s Galerie Gosserez. Laurens imagines it, in anthropomorphic terms, penetrating the wall and looking on to the other side

Daphna Laurens’s ‘Cirkel’ floor lamp is part of an eponymous collection designed for Paris’s Galerie Gosserez. Laurens imagines it, in anthropomorphic terms, penetrating the wall and looking on to the other side

We all need a little support sometimes. Behind the growing trend in furniture and lighting for wall-leaning or wall-mounted designs is a diversity of factors, among them the practical, the social and the aesthetic. Architonic gets up close and personal. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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The windows of Room Room, a house in Tokyo designed by Takeshi Hosaka, allow its owners, a deaf couple, to sign to their children through them – and give the building a feeling of permeability; photos Koji Fujii / Nacasa & Partners

The windows of Room Room, a house in Tokyo designed by Takeshi Hosaka, allow its owners, a deaf couple, to sign to their children through them – and give the building a feeling of permeability; photos Koji Fujii / Nacasa & Partners

Beyond their utilitarian function, windows and doors set up an emotional expectation on the part of visitors as to what they’ll encounter within a building, while, at the same time, negotiating the relation that users inside have with the exterior world. Little wonder that so many architects are engaged in a perennial experimentation with these fundamental structural elements. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Multifunctional, auditorium-style steps in New York’s co-working space Neuehouse, designed by Rockwell Group, are used for meetings, lectures and concerts; photo Eric Laignel

Multifunctional, auditorium-style steps in New York’s co-working space Neuehouse, designed by Rockwell Group, are used for meetings, lectures and concerts; photo Eric Laignel

Staircases are overdetermined things. A highly functional element in the internal circulation of a building, they are also laden with cultural and psychological symbolism. We may live in the age of the lift and escalator, but this hasn’t stopped architects using the staircase as a means of adding value to spaces, be it through their aesthetic or engineering virtuosity. It’s not the destination that counts but the getting there. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Tue 24.9.

Out on the Tiles: ceramic architectural facades

Posted by Walter Phillips on 24.09.2013 - Tagged as: ,

Tiles in seven, subtle shades of white, provided by Toni Cumella, clad a building designed by architect Pedro Campos Costa – a new addition to the existing Lisbon Oceanarium

Tiles in seven, subtle shades of white, provided by Toni Cumella, clad a building designed by architect Pedro Campos Costa – a new addition to the existing Lisbon Oceanarium

Contemporary architects internationally are breathing new life into the old tradition of using ceramic elements on exteriors. The result are striking facades that marry expressive ornament with sustainability. (by Dominic Lutyens)

 

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Sun 14.7.

From a Great Height

Posted by Walter Phillips on 14.07.2013 - Tagged as: ,

Four Seasons Hotel. Interior by Hirsch Bedner Associates. Location: Guangzhou International Financial Center (by Wilkinson Eyre Architects), Guangzhou; photo Will Pryce

Four Seasons Hotel. Interior by Hirsch Bedner Associates. Location: Guangzhou International Financial Center (by Wilkinson Eyre Architects), Guangzhou; photo Will Pryce

As ever-taller skyscrapers increasingly dominate the urban landscape, London-based architecture and design journalist Dominic Lutyens asks how designers can push the boundaries of interiors ever further upwards.

 

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