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Posts tagged as 'DMY Berlin'

'Trapezium' by Robhoff, photo by Stephanie Neumann

Last year we discovered the young Berlin based designer Robert Hoffmann at DMY festival, when presented his final year project. This year he showcased his newest creation ‘Trapezium’ a rather artless yet impressing pendant light which is composed of two identical halfs of edged sheet metal. The illuminated gap between these two elements underlines the lamp’s simple composition.

'Trapezium' by Robhoff, photo by Stephanie Neumann

to the Robhoff website

‘Modulares Licht’ by Robert Hoffmann





The Austrian/Croatian designstudio For Use/Numen presented their impressing tape installation during this year’s DMY festival in Berlin. Due to the large area it was not possible to mount the installation as it was conceived like a kind of parasite, site specific object, which uses the existing architecture as docking units. Instead it was built into a custom scaffolding construction, executed within four days (approximately 160 working hours) utilizing almost 700 conventional transparent tapes (45 km of tape).





“The tendons of multiple layers of transparent adhesive tape are firstly stretched in between a construction. The following continuous wrapping of tendons results in a complex, amorphous surface through the process reminiscent of growing of organic forms. The idea for the installation originates in a set design concept for a dance performance in which the form evolves from the movement of the dancers between the pillars. The dancers are stretching the tape while they move, so the resulting shape is a (tape) recording of the choreography”, the designers explain.






more For Use/Numen products @ Architonic

'Rumkugelbahn' by mischer'traxler

We all remember their poetic installation ‘The idea of a tree’. During this year’s DMY Festival our friends from Vienna, the bright design couple mischer’traxler, presented their newest installation, a marble run “powered” by traditional Viennese rum truffles. Designed and build as Vienna Design Week Embassy the rattly and flimsy construction, fixed with thin wires and cardboard tubes forms the playful framework of the preseantation and the rolling little rum truffles show the way through the showcased objects and products from past editions of Vienna Design Week.

'Rumkugelbahn' by mischer'traxler

'Rumkugelbahn' by mischer'traxler

'Rumkugelbahn' by mischer'traxler

'Rumkugelbahn' for Vienna Design Week by mischer'traxler

to the mischer’traxler website

to the Vienna Design Week website

'DaR' by Christof Schmidt, photo by Ali Schmidt, Berlin

As part of his final year project at Kunsthochschule Kassel the young German designer Christof Schmidt developed this smart joining technique. The solid wooden elements of the chair are broken to measure and placed into a silicone-mould. Due to its expansion the poured in polyurethane foam infiltrates into every single wooden fibre at the breaking point and connects the pieces soundly. The foam hardens within minutes.

‘DaR’ was presented at this year’s DMY Festival for the first time.

'DaR' by Christof Schmidt, photo by Ali Schmidt, Berlin

'DaR' by Christof Schmidt, photo by Ali Schmidt, Berlin

The mould of 'DaR' by Christof Schmidt

'DaR' by Christof Schmidt, photo by Ali Schmidt, Berlin

to the No Smoking website

'Toro' by Felix Klingmüller

The Freiburg and Cologne based designers Arwed Guderian and Felix Klingmüller – together they are Guderian&Klingmüller – presented their newest creations during this year’s DMY Festival in Berlin – amongst them these figurative trestles with the iconic name ‘Toro’ by Felix Klingmüller. The adjustable ‘cow horns’ enable the user to apply different sizes of table tops. The distance between the horns is scalable from 65 – 90 cm.

'Toro' by Felix Klingmüller

'Toro' by Felix Klingmüller

The stool or occasional table ‘Dot’ is also based on a clamping mechanism. The splay of the sheet metal stabilizes the seating surface and builds the holder of the legs.

'Toro' by Felix Klingmüller

'Toro' by Felix Klingmüller

to the Guderian&Klingmüller website

'Franzl' by Sebastian Schneider

The young German design student and trained cabinet maker Sebastian Schneider recently presented this hinged table and bench – an elegant and smartly translated alternative to the typical German “beer bench”. The tripod base is composed of three loosly connected legs a joining rod and a collet made from aluminium and gets stabilised with the weight of the user. And the best thing is – all those who have had a few to many beers in a typical beer tent once know what I am talking about – due to the tripod you may sit on the one side and the bench will not overturn.

'Franzl' by Sebastian Schneider

'Franzl' by Sebastian Schneider

'Franzl' by Sebastian Schneider

to the Sebastian Schneider website

Fri 11.6.

Pour les Alpes (CH) at DMY Berlin

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 11.06.2010 - Tagged as: , , , ,

'Kristall' by Pour les Alpes

'Kristall' by Pour les Alpes

The two young Swiss designers Tina Stieger and Annina Gähwiler – together they founded their studio Pour les Alpes – are currently presenting their newest piece at this year’s DMY Berlin and underline their affinity to hand-crafted processing and rural aesthetics: ‘Kristall’ a plant pot made from oak tree was inspired by the mountain crystal: “arisen from the depths of nature, legendary stories of its discovery and sculptural in its appearance.”

'Kristall' by Pour les Alpes

“As part of the sculpture the plants grow out of a crack which runs along the faceted shape”, the designers explain.

'Kristall' by Pour les Alpes

'Kristall' by Pour les Alpes

to the Pour les Alpes website

'Network' by Studio Aisslinger

During this year’s currently ongoing DMY festival in Berlin, the German design practice Studio Aisslinger presents its new edition of seating furniture. With ‘Network’ Werner Aisslinger and his team created light and transparents structures based on the smart combination of high technologies and traditional stitching techniques.

'Network' by Studio Aisslinger

“The volumes are first translated with software into 2d projections of themselves that can be directly programmed into the machines that stitch the pattern into a carrying surface. The carrying surface is then dissolved and the embroidered 2d pattern becomes free to form a 3d object. The objects formed by the stitched honeycomb structures are fixed over a fiberglass mould and impregnated with resin in order to make them rigid and constructive”, the designers explain.

'Network' by Studio Aisslinger

‘NETwork’ was developed together with a traditional German manufacturer in Plauen, a region with a long tradition in stitching and embroidery. The fabrics are made by the Danish manufacturer Kvadrat.

'Network' by Studio Aisslinger

to the Studio Aisslinger profile @ Architonic