Posts tagged as 'conversion'

Kitchen front made from brushed aluminium, photo by Tobias Heuser

Old disused industrial buildings offer exciting opportunities for architects and interior designers. Berlin is rife with these kinds of spaces and, bit by bit, they are being converted into luxurious homes. The interior of this loft, which is located in an old electricity station, was designed by Berlin-based architect Thomas Wienands (LPDM). The spatial division of the wide dwelling area is based on the minimum of intervention, and results from architectural room-dividing furniture – only the lavatory and storage room are separated off, behind newly constructed walls.

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Fri 4.6.

Summerhouse Skåne by LASC studio (DK)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 04.06.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

Skåne is the beautiful countryside in the south of Sweden vis-á-vis Copenhagen. This is where the Danish architectural practice realised this conversion of an abandoned farmhouse. Jonas Labbé and Johannes Schotanus, who set up their studio in 2007, created an interior design which plays on the notion of nostalgia and shelter by combining them with very contemporary desires for space, light and nature.

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

“Houses in the area are traditionally robust and nest-like for protection in the blustery, open landscape. But while the clients were attached to the traditional style, they also wanted to enjoy the nature indoors.
The challenge of the conversion was to re-invent the elements that gave the house a sense of belonging. While elements like original windows and floors were kept, two thirds of the interior walls were torn down. The space was further opened up by inserting large window openings with hidden frames that dissolve in the existing fabric. Accordingly the fine detailing of the old windows is rather accentuated than opposed.”

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

“This strategy of reducing the elements is present in all interventions. Materials are limited to concrete, pine wood and smooth white plaster. The pale and bleached palette connects to the scenery outside and is finished off by an infusion of bright coloured surfaces, relating to conceptions of context and memory. The colours are reminiscent of the clients’ many years in China, but also of summer days spent on the nearby beach with its bright towels and kites. The colours are never boldly presented, but appear and disappear as one transitions from one space to the other.”

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

“The precise placement of the stair, windows and floors emphasize the meetings of contrasting surfaces. The result is a contemporary simulation of the narrative that old houses often seem to possess. The two-sided stove is placed in the heart of the house, elevated slightly to bring the fire closer to eye-level. The placement of the stove marks the meeting of the new concrete floor with the old wooden floor. This meeting ends precisely at the edge of a large cut-out window.”

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

“Having a restrained budget to work with, the key design strategy was to opt for an ‘immaterial luxury’. Using only inexpensive materials opened up for adding elements made on site, like a heated concrete bathroom bench, a wooden shower niche or a custom made steel bench. The result is an unpretentious summerhouse that brings the focus of luxury back to being about experience and simplicity: the direct relation to nature, splashes of bright colours or the sound of water falling on wood.”

Summerhouse Skåne, photo by Laura Stamer

to the LASC studio profile @ Architonic

Wed 2.6.

Restauration Center by UTArchitects (DE)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 02.06.2010 - Tagged as: , , , ,

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

The Berlin based practice UTArchitects realised this new building of a wood workshop, located on an old farmstead in the southern part of Berlin. During the GDR-times the building degenerated, at the access yard barns have been demolished and instead it has been occupied by garage buildings. Since the architectural intervention of UTArchitects, which included also the restauration of the old farmer house, the complex is used as a training centre for carpenters and restorers run by the Restoration Center Berlin.

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

“With the demolition of garages the new workshop building creates the original u-shape of buildings around the yard. Rooms for administration and training classrooms are located in the farm house. The craftsmen education is being held in the workshop. The workshop is designed as a building which opens up towards the yard and the farmhouse. The external geometry strongly refers to the old farmhouse, while the workshop is lower in height. Therefore the farmhouse is still recognized as the head building of the composition, while the new building is set-back and appears as an open shell with the interior connecting with the yard.
Facade and roof of the workshop form a continuous surface, which is wrapped over the historic courtyard to create an open hall. The sheltered exterior, the machine hall and the and the craftsmen studio in the mezzanine are separated by glass walls to support communication between the trainees and to offer views into the yard from all corners of the house.”

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

“While the facades towards the farmhouse and the yard are glazed full height, the street facade is predominantly closed and only structured by vertical window slits. On the yard side the metal roof cantilevers up to four meters in order to create sun- and weather protection as well as for sound protection towards the neighbourhood. The space under the cantilevering roof is used for temporary deposits, and also as a workspace, for educational lessons or rests during the summer.

The workshop is a low-cost wood construction, reinforced by floor slap and stairs. All materials are of simple origin: facade and roof surfaces have corrugated metal sheets on the outside and painted cardboard plates on the inside. All surfaces on the inside are of spruce wood.

Both buildings are heated by a central wood heating, filled with leftovers of the daily production.”

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

Restauration Center, photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

to the UTArchitects profile @ Architonic

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

The Danish architectural practice C.F. Møller recently unveilded this new apartment building – a conversion of an old disused silo complex into a ‘rural high-rise’, with 21 high-quality residences composed as individual and unique ‘stacked villas’.

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

“The ‘stacked villas’ are an alternative to standard apartments or to detached suburban sprawl, and are a mix of single storey flats and maisonettes, meaning that even the lower levels fully get to enjoy the views, and that no two flats are the same.

The actual silo contains staircases and lifts, and provides the base of a common roof terrace. Around the tower, the apartments are built up upon a steel structure in eye-catching forms which protrude out into the light and the landscape – a bit like Lego bricks.

This unusual structure with its protrusions and displacements provides all of the apartments with generous outdoor spaces, and views of Aarhus Bay and the city itself. Similarly, every apartment enjoys sunlight in the morning, mid-day and evening, whether placed to the north or south of the silo structure.”

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

The interlaced annexes create intimate living spaces with a maximum of direct natural light.

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

Silo before conversion

Location: Løgten, Denmark
Client: Løgten Midt A/S
Architect: C. F. Møller Architects in collaboration with Christian Carlsen Arkitektfirma
Landscape Architect: C. F. Møller Architects
Engineer: Niras
Size: 3000 m2 (silo conversion housing), 1500 m2 (mixed-use urban centre)
Year: 2004-2010


to the C.F. Møller Architects profile @ Architonic

seen @ Dagensdesign

Café Moskau conference center, photo by Stefan Müller

For Berlin people it is legendary. Café Moskau, built on the representative stalinistic Karl-Marx-Allee as a symbol of strong solidarity with the “big brother” Soviet Union in 1964, used to be THE restaurant in former East Berlin.

In the 1990s after German reunification the atrium building was used by the Berlin party scene. In 2007 Nicolas Berggruen Berlin Three Properties bought the property and started the conversion into a conference center in colaboration with the Berlin based practice HSH Architekten.

Café Moskau conference center, photo by Stefan Müller

Café Moskau conference center, photo by Stefan Müller

Café Moskau conference center, photo by Stefan Müller

Café Moskau conference center, photo by Stefan Müller

Café Moskau before conversion

to the HSH Architekten profile @ Architonic

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

In collaboration with Scheitlin&Syfrig Architekten the Zurich based Stefan Zwicky Architekten designed the conversion of a former riding arena in order to integrate it into the existing Credit Suisse Communications Center.

The building offers space for a ballroom, a restaurant, a foyer, offices, seminar rooms and the necessary facilities such as kitchen, toilets, and staff rooms.

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

Credit Suisse Communications Center, photo by Walter Mair

to the Stefan Zwicky Architekten profile @ Architonic

Mon 11.1.

‘Chatou’ by H2O architectes (FR)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 11.01.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

The Paris based H2O architectes created this ‘inhabitable furniture’ for a little backyard building to provide a private space for a teenager looking for his independence.

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

'Chatou' by H2O architectes

“The program includes elements necessary for an autonomous life including sleeping, living, studying and washing. It had been decided between the parents and teenager that meals would still be a shared time in the family home…

Due to the very limited floor space (12m²) we tested different options assembling the programs into a kind of “inhabitable furniture”. Multiple spaces are connected in a unique volume in a series of four split-levels with dedicated areas for each of the programmatic functions.
Silver birch plywood was chosen as the singular material for this living-space-as-furniture, giving a visual coherence and unity to the details and interlocking spaces.”

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

'Chatou' by H2O architectes, photo by Stéphane Chalmean

Client : private

Programm : Creation of a living space for a teenager in a 12m² building

Location : Chatou, Paris suburb

Project year: 2008

to the H2O architectes website

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

The Berlin and London based Pott Architects realised the new Art Campus in Berlin. The nested and spanned façade is made of a translucent membrane and part of an entire conversion of an old warehouse into a new centre for Contemporary Art.

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Here is what the architects explain:

“The opening of the New Central Berlin Station ´Hauptbahnhof´ in 2006 brought the vacant stretch of land to the north of the Spree curve into the focus of public interest.

The area – which covers the surface area of 40 football pitches and is twice as large as the Sony Centre in Potsdamer Platz and Daimler City – will in time be developed into an urban accommodation complex, complete with an art campus, Marina, flats, offices and restaurants.

A key component in the redevelopment of the area was the transformation of an old warehouse into a new centre for Contemporary Art, by Berlin and London based Pott Architects.

They were already commissioned to draw up a master plan for the Art Campus Berlin Project in the area around Hamburger Bahnhof, which was formerly home to numerous warehouses and brownfield sites.

Located directly at the Berlin Spandauer Canal their art forum entitledHalle am Wasser’ appears as a folded sculptural shape at the water´s edge and is now home to contemporary art galleries covering a total area of 2500 square meters.”

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Pott architects succeeded in transforming the formerly insignificant warehouse into a crystalline object, replacing the wretched façade with a multifunctional membrane foil that allows natural daylight into the exhibition halls and maintains a light and sculptural aesthetic from the outside.

The steel skeleton and walls of the hall were adapted to meet the needs of the new users.

The hall is divided into 6 units, between 280 to 600 square meters.

Each unit has its own sanitary and office space, located in a structural cube that sits away from the internal walls of the unit, with sanitary and storage spaces located at ground level and office space above.”

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

“The completion of the project was the starting signal for the regeneration and cultural use of the whole area to the north of the Spree.

The transformation of the ‘Halle am Wasser’ in addition to the existing art institutions in the area such as the Hamburger Bahnhof, the Flick Collection and numerous artist´s studios has ensured that the area is a significant part of the Berlin art scene and a centre of attraction for art enthusiasts worldwide. From 2010 the area is to be extended further to the west of Heidestrasse and the north of the central station, with more office units and residential developments planned.” (Nadine Claudius)

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Art Campus by Pott Architects, photo by Rudi Meisl

Principal Architect: Ingo Pott

Project Team: Anja Schütt

Client: Vivico Real Estate GmbH

Project Years: 2006 – 2008

to the Pott Architect’s website

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