Posts tagged as 'competition'

Thu 10.3.

The Muuto (DK) Sketch Challenge

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.03.2011 - Tagged as: , ,

Deadline for entries: April 1st, 2011

The Danish manufacturer Muuto calls for entries for its first Muuto Sketch Challenge. Creative people are invited to submit illustrations of a space and include a minimum of 3 Muuto designs – the starting point can also be a current project, a previous competition or your most crazy idea. The winner and the runner up will get attractive prices – 5000 and 2000 € in muuto products – and all the best entries will be displayed as part of the Muuto exhibition at Rosanna Orlandi during the upcoming Salone Del Mobile in Milano. The entries should be in A4 or A3 format and sent to sketch@muuto.com.


get inspired by the Muuto products @ Architonic

Gentrification: more and more people leave their home town and move to metropolises to take root in big apartment buildings

“I am home now– on feeling at home or being rootless” is the theme of this year’s gingerbread house exhibition at the Swedish Museum of Architecture in Stockholm. Home can be a safe haven to which you return each day, a place far away or a longing for something unachievable. What is home to you? Under three catagories – ‘children under the age of 12′, ‘architects and professional bakers’ and ‘everyone else who bakes’ – people could submit their contributions. Here some of my favourite pieces.

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Chair by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Chair by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Time to design – new talent award is an international design award with focus on the needs of young design talents in the beginning of their career. The award consists of three months residency at the National Workshops for Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen, 50.000 DKK donated by the Cultural Ministry of Denmark, two weeks exhibition in Normann Copenhagen Flagship Store and career coaching.

To Hunn Wai and Francesca Lanzavecchia are the winners of this year’s Time to design – new talent award 2009. From November 26 the results are showcased at Normann Copenhagen where Wai & Lanzavecchia exhibits a series of interior products.

Chair by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Chair by Wai & Lanzavecchia

All of the furniture are made of Danish maple tree (acer) and covered with changeable, stretchy fabric, which takes form depending on the things the furniture contains. The visitors will see a shelf with skin which at the same time protects the books and creates alternate sculptural expressions, – a commode which swallows your possessions in different apertures, and a chair which acts as a personal sanctuary for one (or two) and which is able to transform its space from private to public

Commode by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Commode by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Shelf by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Shelf by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Shelf by Wai & Lanzavecchia

Shelf by Wai & Lanzavecchia

to the Time To Design website

Tue 27.10.

Design It: Shelter Competition winners

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 27.10.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang, Denmark

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang, Denmark, Juried Prize

The Guggenheim and Google SketchUp invited amateur and professional designers from around the world to submit a 3-D shelter for any location in the world using Google SketchUp and Google Earth. Over the course of the summer, nearly 600 contestants from 68 different countries submitted designs that met the competition requirements.

The winners for the People’s Prize and the Juried Prize have now been announced. Congratulations to David Mares of Setúbal, Portugal, winner of the People’s Prize for CBS – Cork Block Shelter; and David Eltang, hailing from Aarhus, Denmark, winner of the Juried Prize for his design, SeaShelter!

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang

SeaShelter is situated in the Wadden-sea, a unique coastline, with shallow water but tides of 1-3 meters and exposed seabed at low tide. It is habitat for a variety of birds and seals. SeaShelter offers opportunity to stay in the Wadden-sea even at high tide, and opportunity to discover wildlife and seabed when flooded. Interior Workspace: Horizontal view, ‘Tidal Stair’: Sea-level view, ‘Observation and resting Tower’: Non-flooded panoramic view.

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang

'SeaShelter' by David Eltang

CBS is located at Vale dos Barris. It was designed to be an ecological and living block. In a microclimate that ranges from the dry heat to damp cold, the application of cork is a good way of thermally isolating the shelter and also providing acoustic insulation for study/sleep. The dynamic facade gives visual interaction when in living-studying mode; in rest-sleep mode it closes to provide privacy for its occupant.

'CBS – Cork Block Shelter' by David Mares, Portugal, People's Prize

'CBS – Cork Block Shelter' by David Mares, Portugal, People's Prize

'CBS – Cork Block Shelter' by David Mares

'CBS – Cork Block Shelter' by David Mares

to all finalists

Winner project by Zaha Hadid Architects

Winner project by Zaha Hadid Architects

‘Nuraghi’ are the megalithic, domed buildings in Sardinia and souvenirs of the island´s distinctive “Nuragic” culture dating back before 1500 BC. Today many of the 8000 existing archaic stone towers have been restored and Su Nuraxi di Barumini, one of the most important archaeological sites, has even become part of the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

Last year the construction of a Museum of Nuragic Culture and Contemporary Art started, with the London-based Zaha Hadid Architects winning the competition ahead of other prestigious entries by well-known international architects.

Propsal by Archea Associati

Propsal by Archea Associati

An extraordinary submission was the design of the Florence-based architects Archea Associati. Their monolithic building with its central opening open to the sky is a clear reference to original Nuragic architecture.

Proposal by Archea Associati

Proposal by Archea Associati

The oculus reminds of the nuragic architecture

The oculus reminds of the Nuragic architecture

to the Archea Associati website

more information about Nuragic architecture

to the Zaha Hadid Architects website

New walls, please!

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 07.08.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

2. Prize from 2007, 'Naturelle' by Claudia Bombsch

2. Prize from 2007, 'Naturelle' by Claudia Bombsch

Together with the German Design Council the A.S. Création Tapetenstiftung (wallpaper foundation) calls for entries for their competition “New walls, please!”. Students and young designers and architects can submit their proposals for wallpaper design, modular systems, panels and visionary ideas for wall design until 31st August, 2009. The designs are independent of format, raster, rapport shape, colour, material technique and technology.

Special Mention 2007, 'Things behind' by Jan Lages

Special Mention 2007, 'Things behind' by Jan Lages

Detail of 'Things behind'

Detail of 'Things behind'

find the competition documents here

Mon 15.6.

‘Phyte’ by Nicolas Mouret

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 15.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Phyte' by Nicolas Mouret

'Phyte' by Nicolas Mouret

When Gustave Eiffel buit his iron tower in 1889 he caused a sensation because of the industrial look and the bare construction of the town´s landmark to be.

This year at the end of March the young designer Nicolas Mouret unveiled his proposal for the Eiffel competition, a flexible and light tower, which caused a furore, partly because of its beautiful appearance but also for another less pleasant reason.

The flexible construction

The flexible construction

The construction consists of eight mono-bloc structural members which are articulated by gimbals and guys that ensure stability while allowing rotating movement. They are fibre concrete tubes filled by ultra strong fibrecrete and carry spoke- beams with triangulated extremities, stiffened and tied by cables.

'Phyte' by Nicolas Mouret

'Phyte' by Nicolas Mouret

“This project is a part of a reflection concerning the lack of naturalness in a city and the way to balance it without the use of organic matter, living vegetable matter.

My conclusion was that the city would be a vast expanse of static buildings buildings in which the only movements would be the streams of traffic. On the contrary, nature would be a synonym for perpetual motion. Therefore this tower (ultra strong fibrecrete) would be moving in a frozen city.

The other constraint was to take a stand in the tradition of Gustave Eiffel’s works, and to build with resources that he wouldn´t have been able to use in his time.

Also in my opinion it wasn’t possible for me to think of a building of 380 meters in height that would be functional only at its single root, that’s why the stance of this moving tower that would give life to Paris, reminding us of natural movements like the dance of the grass, the flow of the waves, clouds of sand in the desert…” Nicolas explains.

Detail

Detail

The 24-year old Nicolas actually won the Eiffel competition, but was disqualified immediately after the jury found out that he wasn´t an architecture student but a design student, which is against the rules of the competition. By the way, Gustave Eiffel wasn´t an architect but an engineer.

to the Nicolas Mouret website

Wed 10.6.

Design It: Shelter Competition

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Shelter by Frank Lloyd Wright

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Google today announced the launch of Design It: Shelter Competition, a global, online initiative that invites the public to use Google Earth and Google SketchUp to create and submit designs for virtual 3-D shelters for a location of their choice anywhere on Earth. The competition opened June 8, 2009, Frank Lloyd Wright’s birthday; closes to submissions on August 23.

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The competition takes its inspiration from Learning By Doing, an exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum’s Sackler Center for Arts Education curated by David van der Leer, the museum’s Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design, which features plans, photographs, and models of shelters built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. For the past seven decades, students at the school have taken on the challenge of designing, building, and living in small shelters nestled in the landscape of the school’s Arizona Taliesin West campus and recently on the Taliesin campus in Wisconsin as well. In addition to providing hands-on management and construction experience, the shelter program encourages students to consider human needs for safety and comfort as well as the relationship between architecture and place. Inspired by the program, the Design It: Shelter Competition opens Wright’s challenge to the world by asking participants to design an ideal shelter in a location of their choice and in response to that location. “We hope this competition will raise awareness of the role that architecture and design can play in everyday life while stimulating a sense of joy for design,” said van der Leer.

to the competition´s website

seen at ArchDaily