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Posts tagged as 'cladding'

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

The Basel based HHF Architekten realised this countryhouse for two young art collectors. The design reflects their request for simple abstract looking piece, sitting almost without scale on top of the vaste property, which is located two hours upstate from New York City.

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

“The four equal sized boxes are built as simple wood construction covered with corrugated metal panels on the outside and wood and gypsum panels on the inside. The floor plan is based on the needs of a traditional countryhouse. Only partially the organization of the rooms is a direct consequence of the rigid outer form. The Living Room focuses on the different light conditions needed for an existing and future art collection, while the great view into the nearby countryside is present without being dominant. The sequence of the different rooms reflects the idea of a private gallery. Natural light is coming into the spaces through the openings in between the outer boxes.”

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Ellen Mc Dermott

Tsai Residence, photo by Ellen Mc Dermott

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Iwan Baan

Tsai Residence, photo by Nikolas Koenig

Tsai Residence, photo by Nikolas Koenig

to the HHF Architekten profile @ Architonic

to the Iwan Baan website

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

This multi-family complex in San Candido / Italy was realised by the London based Plasma Studio Architects.

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

“Tetris House is derived from turning very pragmatic parameters into a spatially engaging concept: multiple programmatic demands (five self-contained units, parking space and other covered exterior areas) have initiated two volumes. L-shaped in plan and section they are spatially interwoven as to produce a range of dynamic in-between spaces.”

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

“The building volumes cantilever about five meters out to provide covered parking. The structural forces are legible in the development of the wall and ceiling planes.

The local larch is used with a white tint throughout the interior. The sloped elevation continues as a built-in sideboard that turns into a series of steps and a plinth beneath the internal stairs.”

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

Tetris Haus by Plasma Studio Architects, photo by Cristobal Palma

to the Plasma Studio Architects profile @ Architonic

'Fujitsubo' by Yoshihiro Hirotani and Yusaku Ishida

'Fujitsubo' by Yoshihiro Hirotani and Yusaku Ishida

This copper cladded house in Tokyo’s trendy Omotesando neighborhood was designed by Yoshihiro Hirotani and Yusaku Ishida of Archivision. It was finished this year.

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

'Fujitsubo' by Archivision

seen at What We Do Is Secret

to the Archivision website

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

The New York based practice Andrew Berman Architect realised this copper cladded library and writing studio for a historian in Long Island in 2008.

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Here is what the architects explain:

“The site is adjacent to the client’s home, and is approached on foot through a stand of trees. There is no drive or path. The library sits at the threshold of an open field and a wood. A tidal stream is visible through the woods, at the rear of the site.

The building was conceived as a simple structure with a mutable presence in the landscape. It maps a path from the open field, through a doorway at the edge of the woods, to a light filled space set in the tree canopy.

The interior is defined by douglas fir, books, and light. The exterior, clad in copper, shifts in apparent form and color depending on the light of the day, the viewing angle, and the seasons. The copper can appear reflective and bright, as well as matte and dark. The velvety browns and violets will slowly give way to green.”

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Writing Studio and Library by Andrew Berman Architect, photo by Michael Moran

Project architect: Andrew Berman AIA

Project manager: Julia Neubauer

Project team: Dan Misri Dario Oechsli

Landscape Design: Eleanor McPeck Landscape Design

Structural Engineer: Ramon Gilsanz

Gilsanz Murray Steficek LLP

Mechanical Engineering: CGM Engineering

Daylight Consultant Carpenter Norris Consulting

Acoustical Consultant: Robert F Mahoney & Associates

General Contractor: R.B. Hartwell and Sons

Cabinetmaker: Jim Ledger / Fineline Custom Cabinet

to the Andrew Berman Architect website

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

The Helsinki based Sanaksenaho Architects realised this copper cladded church on an island close to Turku / Finland.

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“In the landscape of the island of Hirvensalo, forested hills rise from the flat fields. The chapel is aligned east west atop one of the hills. Its siting focuses the landscape. The surrounding existing buildings, which are parts of the service center meant for cancer patients, form a village from which the chapel rises. The copper surface of the chapel will become green by time and so the building will be in harmony with the colour of the surrounding trees. The form of the chapel speaks quietly. The intention was to create a large landscapesculpture and a small building. The path to the chapel rises up the hill. The entrance to the chapel is through a small foyer.”

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The foyer leads to the large hall, the stomach of the fish. The fish was a symbol of first Christians. The early symbol fits to the chapel, because it is ecumenical, i.e. meant for all Christians despite of their congregation. The gallery and the chapel are one space. The gallery is to the rear of the space and the chapel to the front. The altar is at the end of the axis. In the rear space the benches are taken away when there is an art exhibition.

The interior is of pinewood. The contrasting play of light and shadow powerfully articulates the interior of the space. The wooden pine ribs of the construction are lit by spotlights. Strong indirect light enters from both ends of the chapel. The altar window is an art work created by artist Hannu Konola.”

Copper cladding, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Copper cladding, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The exhibition of art and religious ceremonies coexist within the same space. The symbiosis of art and ceremony is well known from Renaissance churches, which are still used in this way. Visitors view the art at the rear of the space, while religious ceremonies are occurring in the front of the chapel.”

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Location: Seiskarinkatu 35, Turku, Finland
Surface area: 300 m2
Building Volume: 2400 m3
Costs: 1 600 000 euros
Investor/Client: St. Henry’s Chapel Association
Design Year: 1995 competition, 1997
Building period: 2004-2005
Glass artist: Hannu Konola
Structural engineer: Kalevi Narmala
Hvac engineer: Juhani Lehtonen
Electrical engineer: Taneli Mussaari
Constructor: Hartela Oy, Turku, Finland (total contract)

to the anaksenaho Architects website

more architecture projects @ Architonic