Posts tagged as 'church'

'Knocktopher Friary' by ODOS Architects

The Irish practice ODOS Architects realised this extension and refurbishment of an existing protected friary building in Knocktopher, Co. Kilkenny. Since the original collection of extensions and structures to the rear of the Friary building and adjoining Church were demolished the Dublin based architects were commisoned to design a new master plan for this small complex of buildings around a new central courtyard.

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St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

The Helsinki based Sanaksenaho Architects realised this copper cladded church on an island close to Turku / Finland.

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“In the landscape of the island of Hirvensalo, forested hills rise from the flat fields. The chapel is aligned east west atop one of the hills. Its siting focuses the landscape. The surrounding existing buildings, which are parts of the service center meant for cancer patients, form a village from which the chapel rises. The copper surface of the chapel will become green by time and so the building will be in harmony with the colour of the surrounding trees. The form of the chapel speaks quietly. The intention was to create a large landscapesculpture and a small building. The path to the chapel rises up the hill. The entrance to the chapel is through a small foyer.”

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The foyer leads to the large hall, the stomach of the fish. The fish was a symbol of first Christians. The early symbol fits to the chapel, because it is ecumenical, i.e. meant for all Christians despite of their congregation. The gallery and the chapel are one space. The gallery is to the rear of the space and the chapel to the front. The altar is at the end of the axis. In the rear space the benches are taken away when there is an art exhibition.

The interior is of pinewood. The contrasting play of light and shadow powerfully articulates the interior of the space. The wooden pine ribs of the construction are lit by spotlights. Strong indirect light enters from both ends of the chapel. The altar window is an art work created by artist Hannu Konola.”

Copper cladding, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Copper cladding, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The exhibition of art and religious ceremonies coexist within the same space. The symbiosis of art and ceremony is well known from Renaissance churches, which are still used in this way. Visitors view the art at the rear of the space, while religious ceremonies are occurring in the front of the chapel.”

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

St. Henry’s Ecumenical Art Chapel by Sanaksenaho Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Location: Seiskarinkatu 35, Turku, Finland
Surface area: 300 m2
Building Volume: 2400 m3
Costs: 1 600 000 euros
Investor/Client: St. Henry’s Chapel Association
Design Year: 1995 competition, 1997
Building period: 2004-2005
Glass artist: Hannu Konola
Structural engineer: Kalevi Narmala
Hvac engineer: Juhani Lehtonen
Electrical engineer: Taneli Mussaari
Constructor: Hartela Oy, Turku, Finland (total contract)

to the anaksenaho Architects website

more architecture projects @ Architonic

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

This church was the master’s thesis of Anssi Lassila, co-founder of the Finnish practice Lassila Hirvilammi Architects. The competition was arranged in 1999 at the University of Oulu’s Department of Architecture. The church is situated where the old church, torn down in 1841, is assumed to have stood, in the middle of fields, by a river. It is modern but hand-built using 18th century methods.

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Here is what the architects explain:

“The basic concept is simple both structurally and functionally. The simple forms owe something both to vernacular wooden churches and bell towers as well as pared-down contemporary architecture. The idea of a modern church built using traditional methods at first seemed not only novel but also problematic, but finally proved enriching to the project. The spirit and appearance of the building is inimitable.”

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

“The building comprises two parts: the “core” is built of logs and the “cloak” of shingles tarred black on the outside. The solution sought to combine simple, archaic atmosphere and optimal weather resistance. Between the shingle envelope and the log core there remains the service spaces: the vestibule, vestry, and storage rooms. Visitors are lead through a dimly lit space to a light church interior lit from above by lanterns. The building is visually calm, offering a silent haven. When it is dark, the church will be lit by glass lanterns and candles. The pews will not be fixed to allow for a flexible use of space and the altar can also be moved.

Although the church will be small in size, the exceptional building method means that the background research and learning traditional building, as well as inventing some novel solutions, is quite a large undertaking.”

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämaäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämaäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

Kärsämäki Shingle Church by Lassila Hirvilammi Architects, photo by Jussi Tiainen

to the Lassila Hirvilammi Architects website

more architect’s projects @ Architonic

Tue 8.9.

Gru Chapel in Guarulhos, Sao Paulo / Brazil by Yuri Vital

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 08.09.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Gru Chapel by Yuri Santos

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

With his Gru Chapel, the young Brazilian architect Yuri Vital created a poular church for a poor community of the city of Guarulhos, Sao Paulo. Yuri’s talent and social initiative, already prooved with his Box House project, was once more honored, this time by the most important Award for young Brazilian architects, 9° Prêmio Jovens Arquitetos 2009.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Here is what Yuri Vital explains:

In Guarulhos suburbs, close to the Guarulhos International Airport, was elaborated a simple popular chapel. The client asked for a low cost project that should also be able to become a great religious reference for the region.

It was created a unadorned, pure and simple monolith, offering a great lightness and minimizing the cost of construction. The lot has a 3 meters inclination, which allowed the idealization of a street level entrance, while accommodating the parking lot at the gap.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

With the project, it was also asked areas of specific activities (such as the administration, library, cafeteria, and restrooms). The accesses to these areas are made independently, allowing the visitors to exclusively access the area they want to, without interfering in the religious space.

 

Structure

The largest distance in between columns is 8.4 meters, so that the chapel is entirely made with pre-cast slabs, facilitating the construction and reducing the cost, due to the reduce of the need of time.

To gain flexibility, the parking lot has no pillars and the whole weight of the monolith is distributed by the lateral blades. The mezzanine is supported by the wall on the left and by a small metal structure.

The cover is made with a metallic thermal tile, supported also by a metallic structure, which is embedded in the side of the chapel. This coverage has two side sheds for lighting.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Light

The chapel is lit mostly by natural light, with three main points: the very front facade (composed by a skin “Cobogós”), and two lateral cuts on the roof. These zeniths are protected from rain by a skin of laminated glass.

The library and cafeteria also have natural light due to a glass skin on the sides.

Section

Section

to the Yuri Vital website

 

to the Box House by Yuri Vital

Fri 26.6.

Mega churches by Christoph Morlinghaus

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 26.06.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

The German photographer Christoph Morlinghaus, probably best known for his architectural photography, has lived in New York since 2002, after leaving London where he worked before. His ’straight photography’ of empty spaces often leaves a mystical and surreal impression, even though Christoph declares that he doesn’t use any additional light – not to mention that he prints and contacts his own negatives without the use of computers. “I strongly believe that the beauty and clarity that is inherent in the traditional photographic technique is sufficient for everything that I shoot”, Christoph explains. Here you’ll find some examples of Christopher´s church series.

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

Photo by Christoph Morlinghaus

to the Christoph Morlinghaus website

an interview with Christoph Morlinghaus at feature shot

Fri 24.4.

New Church of Foligno/Italy by Fuksas Architects

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 24.04.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

The monolith

The monolith

After winning the competition Massimiliano and Doriana Fuksas received the commission in 2001 to execute their design for a new church in Foligno, Umbria, which had been devastated by an earthquake. The recent disaster in the Abruzzi region gives this subject a disturbing relevance to the present day – how do you approach a town which was destroyed within seconds, whose inhabitants are still mourning for lost loved ones and whose rich architectural tradition was in many places completely flattened?

Planning the house of god under these circumstances must be very much an additional challenge.

light and shadow play

light and shadow play

The architect´s statement:

The new parish designed by Fuksas Architects is a monolith of pure geometry, absolute, in a tin box. There are two main architectural elements that are identified with the functions of the religious center, the first element, the church building, consists of two rectangles inserted into one another, the second element, also rectangular in shape but long and low, is home to the sacristy, the Pastoral Ministry of Local and Casa Canonica. A third and smaller architectural element combines the latter two. Spirituality and meditation join together in a play of natural light entering horizontally and vertically, drawing a dialogue with the sky.

All Photos by Moreno Maggi

All Photos by Moreno Maggi

to the Fuksas website