September 2016
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
2627282930  

Posts tagged as 'China'

'Dream Cube' by ESI Design, photo by Basil Childers

The New York based architectural practice ESI Design realised the Shanghai Corporate Pavilion (SCP) which is characterised by its illuminated façade – an unique 3D display surface comprised of a 65 km long grid made from plastic tubes, each spaced half a meter apart with LEDs every ten inches. Heart of the pavilion is the Dream Cube Control Room, an immersive, interactive 360-degree theatre experience where the visitors’ collective movements trigger changes to millions of LED lights on the Dream Cube’s façade.

(more…)

UK Pavilion by Heatherwick Studio

The London based architectural practice Heatherwick Studio, founded in 1994 by Thomas Heatherwick, recently unveiled the UK Pavilion for the World Expo in Shanghai.

Held under the auspices of the Bureau International des Expositions, the Shanghai Expo will be the largest the world has ever seen. Staged on a 5,28 km2 city centre site beside the Huangpu River, it features pavilions representing the ideas and cultural and commercial ambitions of more than 200 countries and international organisations.

UK Pavilion by Heatherwick Studio

Get here some information about the remarkable optic fibre facade of the Seed Cathedral in the center of the Pavilion:

“The Seed Cathedral sits in the centre of the UK Pavilion’s site, 20 metres in height, formed from 60,000 slender transparent fibre optic rods, each 7.5 metres long and each encasing one or more seeds at its tip. During the day, they draw daylight inwards to illuminate the interior. At night, light sources inside each rod allow the whole structure to glow. As the wind moves past, the building and its optic “hairs” gently move to create a dynamic effect. Heatherwick previously experimented with texture and architecture at a much smaller scale with his Sitooterie projects. The Seed Cathedral is the ultimate development of this. Inside the darkened inner sanctum of the Seed Cathedral, the tips of the fibre optic filaments form an apparently hovering galaxy of slim vitrines containing a vast array of embedded seeds. The seeds have been sourced from China’s Kunming Institute of Botany, a partner in Kew Royal Botanic Gardens’ Millennium Seed Bank Project. Visitors will pass through this tranquil, contemplative space, surrounded by the tens of thousands of points of light illuminating the seeds.”

UK Pavilion by Heatherwick Studio

UK Pavilion by Heatherwick Studio

UK Pavilion by Heatherwick Studio

more information about the UK Pavilion @ Architonic

to the Heatherwick Studio profile @ Architonic

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The international architects Marco Casagrande, Hsieh Ying-chun and Roan Ching-yueh are the WEAK! During this year’s Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecturecreated they created this bamboo pavilion, which offers a stage, fireplace and shade.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Here is what the WEAK! explains:

“The building is realized on a wasteland of a ruined building site in-between the Shenzhen City Hall and an illegal workers camp. The design is inspired by insects. The bamboo construction methods are based on local knowledge from rural Guanxi brought into the city by the migrating construction workers.

The space is used during the SZHK Biennale for underground bands, poetry reading, discussions, karaoke and as a lounge for the illegal workers from the neighboring camp. The building offers a shade, a stage and a fireplace. After the Biennale the Bug Dome will act as an un-official social club for illegal workers from the Chinese countryside.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

“The building is weak, flexible and improvised to meet the site-specific conditions. It is growing from a ruin. The architectural control has been given up in order to let the nature step in. The weak architecture is a mediator between the human nature and nature. The construction is a result of participatory planning between the designers, construction workers and local knowledge.

The cocoon is a weak retreat for the modern man to escape from the strength of the exploding urbanism in the heart of Shenzhen. It is a shelter to protect the industrial insects from the elements of un-nature.

When the fire is up a society is born again. One has to take the liberty to travel a thousand years back in order to realize that the things are the same.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The SZHK Biennale started on Sunday 6 December and continues until 23 January 2010.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Architects: Hsieh Ying-chun, Marco Casagrande , Roan Ching-yueh

Construction Work: Chen, Jiang Zhou, Leo Cheng, Marco Casagrande, Nikita Wu, Shao Lei, Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Design Assistant: Frank Chen

Local Knowledge: Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Location: Shenzhen, China

Site: 3000 m2 waste land, ruined building site

Building footprint: 120 m2

Materials: bamboo, wood, gravel, recycled concrete

Completed: 2009

to the Bug Dome blog

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

The Japanese SAKO Architects realised this Housing complex in south-west of Beijing. It consists of four residential building, as well as one commercial building. ‘Bumps’ is one of this months WAN Awards entry in the Residential category.

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

more information at Word Architecture News

to the SAKO Architects website

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

This is the Songzhuang Artists’ Residence designed by DnA in Beijing, China. Located right next to east sixth ring road of Beijing city, Songzhuang Artist Village is undergoing a dramatic expansion of artist population and increasing demand of artist’s working and living space, a 20-units artist residence facing a fishpond at a former outdoor storage lot is one of the local developments targeting such demand.

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

The programmatic requirement of working and living defines the height and geometry of both volumes: 6m height for working and 3m for living; a simple rectangular box for studio and a complex geometry for living indicating bedroom, kitchen and toilet. Living volume is plugged into working volume either on the same level or led by stair to upper level. Corrugated metal as exterior cladding and red brick for horizontal surfaces are used to reflect both industrial and village character.

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

These 20 units are regarded as containers stacking up on this former industrial outdoor storage lot, creating an expressive configuration and spatial quality. The interplay of volume and void, light and shadow allows artists and visitors to constantly explore and experiment the outdoor community space, which could be the extension of art production and presentation as well as linking these 20 units as 20 individual showrooms on open studio days.

In other words, this complex becomes an alternative museum for living art creation and exhibitions.

Photo by Iwan Baan

Photo by Iwan Baan

via Dezona

to the Iwan Baan website

to the DnA website

Red + Housing by ORBOS Architcets

Red + Housing by ORBOS Architcets

The New York-based OBRA Architects was invited to acknowledge and mark the first-year anniversary of the Sichuan earthquake through participation in CROSSING: Dialogues for Emergency Architecture, an exhibition on emergency housing at the National Art Museum of China in Beijing.


“Working from New York City, we seek to take advantage of this opportunity to contribute to the victims of future catastrophe around the world by advancing disciplinary thinking about temporary emergency housing.”


The completed full-scale prototype was exhibited in the entry courtyard to the Museum from May 12 to May 24, 2009.

Red + Housing by OBRA Architects

Red + Housing by OBRA Architects

Architecture on the Edge of Survival involves the development of an original prototype of emergency housing for future potential deployment in areas of natural or man-made disaster anywhere in the world. Emergency housing from the point of view of design is only an extreme form of architecture. Its context is that of almost unsustainable conditions, and its object, the creation of an environment we can inhabit temporarily while living on the edge.

Red+Housing is proposed with the knowledge that, when living on the edge of survival, action needs to be decisive and precise. By definition, an emergency will arise suddenly and demand fast response, but the immediate actions we take can have long-term consequences.

Concept

Part of the concept: marking the disaster area with the emergency architecture

The design has been developed as an in-progress embodiment of the following 10 Points of Architecture on the Edge of Survival.

01. Universal Application

This prototype aspires to universal applicability. Its development contemplates a series of simple modifications that would make it a useful solution anywhere in the world: add insulation and a stove for cold climates; remove doors and windows for tropical climates; replace materials according with local availabilities, etc.

02. Effective Performance

The project makes economical use of materials by enlisting the structural strength of post-tensioning. The bamboo plywood strips of the dome support the enclosure, with the same force with which a bow propels an arrow into the sky.

03. Economical

The project proposes the use of locally available low-cost materials. The materials are always replaceable and are chosen for their performance rather than appearance. When working in different locations materials which become exotic can be replaced with ones that are locally abundant.

Construction

Construction

04. Transportable

All parts are collapsible to flats and can therefore be easily packed and transported.

05. Ease of Assembly

All connections are a simple friction bond of male/female parts which are then secured with a minimum of fasteners.

06. Renewable Materials

In China the project is proposed almost entirely in bamboo plywood, one of earth’s most renewable of materials. The cover fabric can also be considered as woven out of waterproof bamboo fibers.

07. Digitally Pre-fabricated

Digital pre-fabrication makes the project economical in its speed of production and also easy to assemble due to the precision of its fabrication.

08. Open Work

The cruciform house, while iconic, retains in its biaxial symmetry a certain ‘indifference’ that allows its easy recombination with other locally and diversely made structures.

09. Urban/Rural

The geometry of the crosses, when deployed together in groups, defines in-between spaces of infinite flexibility that can suggest an ‘urban’ context for a field of houses. Likewise, if a house is erected by itself, the exterior of the cross creates spaces that mediate between interior and exterior providing a context for people to spend time outside.

10. Flexibility of Use

The geometry of the cross allows the inhabitation of the house as either 1, 2, 3, or 4 different units of housing.

Interior

Interior

The value and need of effective emergency housing is self-evident. There are, of course, a number of different approaches to be considered and our intent is to utilize the opportunity of the architectural design process to test and explore possibilities which might best benefit victims. We feel architecture has something to contribute not only to their physical but also to their emotional and psychological well-being. Under the extreme conditions of a situation of emergency, architecture is rarely called upon to participate in the creation of temporary housing. This exhibit provides an opportunity to test how “high design” can contribute to apparently pre-eminently pragmatic concerns. Emergency housing from the point of view of design is only an extreme form of architecture. Its context is that of almost unsustainable conditions, and its object, the creation of an environment we can inhabit temporarily while living on the edge.

Location: National Art Museum of China, Beijing, PR China

Architects: OBRA Architects, Pablo Castro and Jennifer Lee

OBRA Architects Project Team: Shin Kook Kang, Project Architect, Atsushi Koizumi, Sihyung Lee, Sara Kim, Orla Higgins, Michel Dinis

Special thanks to: National Art Museum of China, United Nations Development Programme China, China Central Academy of Fine Arts

to the OBRA Architects website

Wed 26.8.

‘Drive-In’ Automobile Museum in Nanjing / China by 3Gatti

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 26.08.2009 - Tagged as: , ,

Automobile Museum in Nanjing / China

Automobile Museum in Nanjing / China

The Italian practice 3Gatti won the competition for a car museum in the southern Chinese city of Nanjing.

The museum is articulated in two concentric ramps, which formally consist of a single surface folded up spirally. The “wrinkled” surface of the exhibition space enables the visitors different views of the exposed cars.

Driving up the ramp

Driving up the ramp

“The design of the building is dedicated to the automobile, where the automobile is also the vehicle to visit the space.

You visit the first external ramp of the museum with your own private car, like a safari, you park your car on the roof and visit by foot the internal ramp going down.

The building could seem to appear as a urban car exhibitor, with its corners and angles filled with tempting shining exposed automobiles”, explains Francesco Gatti.

View sight anlysis

View sight anlysis

Automobile Museum by 3Gatti

Automobile Museum by 3Gatti

Chief architect: Francesco Gatti

Project manager: Summer Nie

Collaborators: Nicole Ni, Muavii Sun, Chen qiuju, Jimmy Chu, Luca Spreafico, Damiano Fossati, Kelly Han.

Client: Jiangsu Head Investment group CO.,LTD

Location: Jiangning area, high-tech zone, Nanjing, China.

Total floor area: 15000 m²

Intended construction period: 2009

Materials: Steel structure, resin coating, glass partitions.


to the 3Gatti website

'wove' by EXH

'wove' by EXH

The world is growing together: the Swiss architect Erich Diserens, who is former Associate of Herzog & De Meuron founded together with the young Chinese architect Xi Zhang EXH Design, their Shanghai-based architecture practice and manufacturing company, in 2006. Since then they built up a beautiful collection of furniture and are working on several architectural projects.

Their geometric table ‘Wove’ is made of wood with glossy lacquer (top) and steel (base) and can be used as a conference or dining table. The big version is formally composed of two bases and an according top.

The big version composed of two bases

The big version composed of two bases

more EXH Design products @ Architonic