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Posts tagged as 'chapel'

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

German Ecker Architects hosted a studio of 12 Design-Build students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago this summer. With the kind support of craftsmen, volunteer workers and townspeople of the Odenwald/Bauland, a rural region in central Germany, the students realised this chapel for a local ecumenical church co-operative. It was completetd within eight weeks. For some of the students this projects it was the first experience in practical construction.

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Dea Ecker and her old friend Professor Flury from the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago had the idea for this collaboration after the local Reverend Moser-Feesche contacted Ecker Architekten with the intent to build a chapel – even though he had no funding, held no property, and did not have the support of his congregation.

Field Chapel by students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago

Field Chapel by students from the College of Architecture at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago

“In January 2009 Professor Flury introduced the project to the Design-Build curriculum and received an enthusiastic response. Over the next 3 months, 12 students developed three design alternatives. In March 2009, these projects were personally presented to the governing municipality of Buchen and the citizens of Boedigheim. After a lengthy discussions two projects were chosen for further development, with Prof. Flury ultimately responsible for the feasibility of a final proposal. Armed with a donation of lumber from the city of Buchen, the “Professor from Chicago” and the “Reverend with an idea” asked for the trust and help of the townspeople to realize the project. With commitments from the local blacksmith, carpenter, sawmill owner, and the farmer (whose field the chapel was to be built upon), the town of Boedigheim agreed to implement the project.”

The chapel was constructed by the students with the support of local craftsmen

The chapel was constructed by the students with the support of local craftsmen

“The student group arrived in Germany during the first week of June. Despite an unusually rainy summer, the project progressed smoothly. With the help of countless volunteers, the chapel was constructed in just 8 weeks. Over 400 people witnessed the official benediction on 25 July, 2009.

Fabrication

From the onset of the project development, assembly details were designed to ensure the chapel could be completed by students without construction skills.

The entire wooden structure was cut on a CNC machine according to the student’s drawings. The receiving slots in the four main columns of the tower for the louvers were subsequently hand routed. Not a single plank was sawn on site. The students developed the drawings in various CAD programs and produced the individual components with hand tools and computer-assisted machinery.

The chapel design was based upon utilizing donated, renewable and local materials.”

Benediction of the chapel

Benediction of the chapel

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

Field Chapel in Boedigheim, Germany

to the Field Chapel website

to the Ecker Architekten website

to the Illinois Institute of Technology College of Architecture website

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

This light and translucient wedding chapel in the traditional mexican baroque colonial style La Estancia Wedding Gardens was designed by the young Mexico City based Bunker Architects. The idea to construct a chapel for the garden cames, when one of Bunker´s associates decided to marry in these gardens – the client had been toying for some time with the idea of building the chapel. When he found out a young architect was getting married in his garden the commission to design and build the chapel was granted for what the architects thought was an almost ridiculous caprice: the client found very romantic the idea of an architect designing the chapel he would get married in.

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

Let’s see how this funny story continues:

“…That was the last thing he found romantic in the endless subsequent discussions that followed. He imagined a chapel in the same style of the gardens. We were all against styles. He wanted a classical approach. We were seduced by the “modern”. He desired to blend in. We believed in contrast. He preferred a closed wall chapel. We craved an open chapel. He was eccentric. Ok, in this we coincided. He required air conditioning. We disapproved of the idea given the size of the project… Bunker gradually won every point with eloquent, persuasive and almost stoical arguments. In the end, we did complete the chapel, inaugurate it with a wedding and it became the clients´ pampered and proud new offspring.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

“A crystal chapel in a warm tropical climate seemed like a contradiction in terms. The green house effect appeared to be something we could not elude. We decided on using U-profiled glass panes that are meant to work together as a single membrane. To separate them as single auto-bearing units, to reduce temperatures during the day, made them fragile and vulnerable. The contractor had never been exposed to this idea but was willing to give it a try. The construction went along as planned and our experiment proved successful. With this, we achieved a well ventilated space and a visual play between the interior and exterior.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Megs Inniss

“The site for the chapel was carefully chosen within an enormous area of abundant vegetation. We selected a location that would not require the removal of any of the existing plants or trees, under large jacaranda trees, which form a natural arch over the chapel and provide it with ample shade, thus reducing temperatures during the day. We strived to bring about the least possible impact on the site.”

“The chapel was conceived as a box and compressed to form a peaked roof. Different shapes were traced on its lateral facades to form a prism which was then subtracted from the main volume. We covered the four facades with U-profiled glass and spaced each piece 10cm. apart from each other. In the altar façade, a cross was outlined and subtracted from the glass veil creating a window that looks out onto the surrounding garden. Exuberant vegetation permeates through the glass lattice walls thus creating a graceful and rhythmical dialogue between the artificial and natural environment.”

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Sebastian Suarez

La Estancia Chapel by Bunker Arquitectura, photo by Sebastian Suarez

Location: La Estancia Gardens, Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico

Site Area: 60,000 sq. meters

Gross Floor Area: 117 sq. meters

Building Height: 6.50 m

Construction System: Concrete foundation; steel columns and beams

Client/Owner: Promotora Amates

Principals: Esteban Suarez, Jorge Arteaga, Sebastian Suarez , Santiago Gitanjalli, Zaida Montañana

Collaborators: Paola Moire, Miguel Angel Martinez, Jimena Muhlia

Main Contractor: ETASA

Mechanical & Electrical Engineer: Cien Acres

Civil & Structural Engineer: DAE

to the Bunker Arquitectura website

Tue 8.9.

Gru Chapel in Guarulhos, Sao Paulo / Brazil by Yuri Vital

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 08.09.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Gru Chapel by Yuri Santos

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

With his Gru Chapel, the young Brazilian architect Yuri Vital created a poular church for a poor community of the city of Guarulhos, Sao Paulo. Yuri’s talent and social initiative, already prooved with his Box House project, was once more honored, this time by the most important Award for young Brazilian architects, 9° Prêmio Jovens Arquitetos 2009.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Here is what Yuri Vital explains:

In Guarulhos suburbs, close to the Guarulhos International Airport, was elaborated a simple popular chapel. The client asked for a low cost project that should also be able to become a great religious reference for the region.

It was created a unadorned, pure and simple monolith, offering a great lightness and minimizing the cost of construction. The lot has a 3 meters inclination, which allowed the idealization of a street level entrance, while accommodating the parking lot at the gap.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

With the project, it was also asked areas of specific activities (such as the administration, library, cafeteria, and restrooms). The accesses to these areas are made independently, allowing the visitors to exclusively access the area they want to, without interfering in the religious space.

 

Structure

The largest distance in between columns is 8.4 meters, so that the chapel is entirely made with pre-cast slabs, facilitating the construction and reducing the cost, due to the reduce of the need of time.

To gain flexibility, the parking lot has no pillars and the whole weight of the monolith is distributed by the lateral blades. The mezzanine is supported by the wall on the left and by a small metal structure.

The cover is made with a metallic thermal tile, supported also by a metallic structure, which is embedded in the side of the chapel. This coverage has two side sheds for lighting.

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Gru Chapel by Yuri Vital

Light

The chapel is lit mostly by natural light, with three main points: the very front facade (composed by a skin “Cobogós”), and two lateral cuts on the roof. These zeniths are protected from rain by a skin of laminated glass.

The library and cafeteria also have natural light due to a glass skin on the sides.

Section

Section

to the Yuri Vital website

 

to the Box House by Yuri Vital

'Farewell Chapel' by OFIS Arhitekti, Photo by Tamoaz Gregoric

'Farewell Chapel' by OFIS Arhitekti, Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

This year the Ljubljana-based OFIS Arhitekti formed by Rok Oman and Spela Videcnik in 1998 unveiled their latest project, the ‘Farewell Cahpel’ in Krasnja, Slovenia.

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Here the architect’s description:

The farewell chapel is located in a village close to Ljubljana. The site plot is next to the existing graveyard. The chapel is cut into the rising landscape. The shape is following the lines of the landscape trajectories around the graveyard. Three curved walls are embracing and dividing the programs. External curve is dividing the surrounding hill from chapel plateau and also reinstates main supporting wall.

Services such as storages, wardrobe restrooms and kitchenette are on the inner side along the wall. An internal curve is embracing main farewell space. It is partly glazed and it is opening towards outside plateau for summer gatherings. The roof is following its own curvature and forming external porch. The cross as catholic sign is featured as laying feature positioned on the rooftop above the main farewell space. It also functions as luminous dynamic element across the space during the daytime and lighting spark at a night time.

Materials are polished concrete, larch wood, glass.

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

'Farewell Chapel', Photo by Tomaz Gregoric

Location: Krasnja, Slovenia
Client: Community of Krasnja
Site Area: 350m2
Bldg. Area: 210m2
Gross Floor Area: 105m2
Structure: reinforced concrete
Max. Height: 4.70 m
Landscape Area: 140m2
Inner space: 70m2

External plateau: 65 m2

Budget: 180.000 EUR

to the OFIS website