Posts tagged as 'BIG'

Mon 10.5.

Denmark’s EXPO-Pavilion in Shanghai by BIG (DK)

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.05.2010 - Tagged as: , , ,

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

She has been beheaded, painted and blown up, but this time it was not some troublemakers who kidnapped the original Little Mermaid, Copenhagen’s beloved landmark, from her rock. From May til October visitors of the World EXPO in Shanghai will be able to see her elegantly sitting in Denmark’s pavilion designed by Bjarke Ingels Group.

The actual attraction though is the conceptual background of the pavilion. Denmark donated 1001 bikes to the city of Shanghai in order to focus on an ecological urban development of the world’s fast growing mega-cities.

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

“We weren’t really finding an obvious hook for our pavilion until we started looking at the recent urban development of Shanghai and Copenhagen. This is a photo of Shanghai from 30 years ago: broad boulevards jam packed with bicycles. Only 2 kinds of cars in Shanghai back then: Shanghai no 1 and Shanghai no 2.

With the massive economic boom and urban explosion everybody wants a car, the streets are congested with traffic jams, and the bicycle has even become forbidden in some parts of town.

In the same period of time, Copenhagen has been creating more bicycle lanes and reducing car traffic. The bicycle has become a symbol of a sustainable city and a healthy lifestyle.

We have developed multiple species of bikes to move not only ourselves but our kids and our stuff around as well.

We even have a so-called City Bike that visitors can borrow for free and move around town before they return.

We thought: Why don’t we relaunch the bicycle as something attractive in Shanghai. We’ll donate 1001 City Bikes to Shanghai that they can keep after the Expo.” BIG explains.

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

“The pavilion is designed as a traffic loop created by the motion of city bikes and pedestrians tied in a knot. Over 300 free city bikes located upon the roofscape, offer the visitors a chance to experience the Danish urban lifestyle which includes biking everywhere. The loops are connected in two places. Coming from the inside, the visitors can move out onto the roof, pick up a bike and re‐visit the exhibition by bike as the outdoor cycle path slips into the interior and runs along the entire exhibition before exiting onto the EXPO grounds. The sequence of events at the exhibition takes place between two parallel facades – the internal and external. The internal is closed and contains different functions of the pavilion. The width varies and is defined by the programme of the inner space. The pavilion’s external façade is made of perforated steel. In the evening time, the façade becomes a sequenced instrument of interactive light illuminating the passers‐by.”

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Hanne Hvattun

“The pavilion is a monolithic structure in white painted steel which keeps it cool during the Shanghai summer sun due to its heat‐reflecting characteristics. The roof is covered with a light blue surfacing texture, known from Danish cycle paths. Inside, the floor is covered with light epoxy and also features the blue cycle path where the bikes pass through the building. The steel of the facade is perforated in a pattern that reflects the actual structural stresses that the pavilion is experiencing making it a 1:1 stress test. The blue cycle path and white concrete surfaces will further define the arrival and exit areas.”

Denmark's EXPO-Pavilion by BIG, photo by Iwan Baan

PS: By the way, while the mermaid is in Shanghai her place in Copenhagen will be replaced by Ai Wei Wei’s multimedia artwork, including a live broadcast of the statue in Shanghai.


to the BIG profile @ Architonic

The New Town Hall in Tallinn by BIG

The New Town Hall in Tallinn by BIG

The Danish Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG), a Copenhagen based group of 85 architects, designers, builders and thinkers, has been awarded first place in an international design competition for the new City Hall near the Linnahall building on the harbour of the Estonian Tallinn. The new design presents a cluster of volumes, housing different administrative offices. The volumes are elevated creating a new public place under the Town Hall. Like most projects by BIG the architecture is derived by rationalised organisational principle, this time to maximize natural lighting by breaking up the building function into small blocks – this allows for courtyards to be created at various levels as well open up the ground floor as an extension of the city.

The volumes are elevated creating a new public place under the Town Hall.

The volumes are elevated creating a new public place under the Town Hall.

Inside, the city council greeting hall is accessed via the grand stair or elevators directly from the market place, or from the city offices around it. Above the greeting hall, the city council is located in a generous space illuminated though a large window facing the city. The ceiling of the tower is tiled with a reflective surface – creating a kind of ‘periscope’ effect. The circular formation of council members will thus be reflected in the tilted ceiling. From a distance the silhouette of the town hall tower enters the family of Tallinn’s historical spires including those of the Niguliste Museum-Concert Hall, Toomkirik, Kaarli Kirik, Pühavaimu Kirik, St. Olav Church and the current Town Hall.

The ceiling of the tower is tiled with a reflective surface - creating a kind of ‘periscope’ effect.

The ceiling of the tower is tiled with a reflective surface - creating a kind of ‘periscope’ effect.

Bjarke Ingels, BIG, Partner-in-Charge:

“There is a saying that success has many fathers. That is especially true when designing such a crucial public building and public space as a town hall. The design needs to be shaped by input from neighbours and users, citizens and politicians. Paradoxically we architects often find ourselves isolated from this crucial dialogue at the moment of conception, due to the anonymity of the architectural competition. Since this was a 2 stage competition, we already had our first feedback from the jury – causing us to dramatically rearrange our design to fit the citizens’ needs. As a result we have envisioned a very elastic structure – capable of adapting to unexpected demands. We see it as the first conversation in a design dialogue we look forward to continue.”

to the Bjarke Ingels Group

Kaufhauskanal Metrozone by BIG and Topotek 1

Kaufhauskanal Metrozone by BIG and Topotek1

The winner project has been announced for the construction project which is soon to take place on the banks of the ‘Kaufhauskanal’ at the inland port of Harburg, a suburb of Hamburg. In cooperation with the Berlin landscape architects Topotek1 the Danish architects from BIG have planned a residential development which will create 80 housing units in this former industrial area of the city.

Kaufhauskanal housing scheme provides 80 residential units

Kaufhauskanal housing scheme provides 80 residential units

“The typology for the overall plan for the Kaufhauskanal Metrozone is designed as a series of new “Kaufhaus Hybrids””. The scheme is meant to accommodate the existing quarter so that all the new buildings slope downwards and outwards to meet the heights of the existing buildings. The roofs are angled and inclined to maximize views to the sky and at the same time minimize the noise from the surrounding streets, roads and railway.”

Kaufhauskanal Metrozone by BIG and Topotek1

Kaufhauskanal Metrozone by BIG and Topotek1

more info at ArchDaily