Posts tagged as 'bamboo'

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The international architects Marco Casagrande, Hsieh Ying-chun and Roan Ching-yueh are the WEAK! During this year’s Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism/Architecturecreated they created this bamboo pavilion, which offers a stage, fireplace and shade.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Here is what the WEAK! explains:

“The building is realized on a wasteland of a ruined building site in-between the Shenzhen City Hall and an illegal workers camp. The design is inspired by insects. The bamboo construction methods are based on local knowledge from rural Guanxi brought into the city by the migrating construction workers.

The space is used during the SZHK Biennale for underground bands, poetry reading, discussions, karaoke and as a lounge for the illegal workers from the neighboring camp. The building offers a shade, a stage and a fireplace. After the Biennale the Bug Dome will act as an un-official social club for illegal workers from the Chinese countryside.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

“The building is weak, flexible and improvised to meet the site-specific conditions. It is growing from a ruin. The architectural control has been given up in order to let the nature step in. The weak architecture is a mediator between the human nature and nature. The construction is a result of participatory planning between the designers, construction workers and local knowledge.

The cocoon is a weak retreat for the modern man to escape from the strength of the exploding urbanism in the heart of Shenzhen. It is a shelter to protect the industrial insects from the elements of un-nature.

When the fire is up a society is born again. One has to take the liberty to travel a thousand years back in order to realize that the things are the same.”

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

The SZHK Biennale started on Sunday 6 December and continues until 23 January 2010.

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

'Bug Dome' in Shenzhen, China by WEAK!

Architects: Hsieh Ying-chun, Marco Casagrande , Roan Ching-yueh

Construction Work: Chen, Jiang Zhou, Leo Cheng, Marco Casagrande, Nikita Wu, Shao Lei, Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Design Assistant: Frank Chen

Local Knowledge: Wei Jia-kuan, Wei Jing-Ke

Location: Shenzhen, China

Site: 3000 m2 waste land, ruined building site

Building footprint: 120 m2

Materials: bamboo, wood, gravel, recycled concrete

Completed: 2009

to the Bug Dome blog

'Grassworks' exhinition at the Aram Gallery

'Grassworks' exhibition at the Aram Gallery

Until 31 October the Aram Gallery showcases ‘Grassworks’ – the most recent creations of Jair Straschnow. The Amsterdam-based Israeli designer developed a comprehensive collection of flatpacked furniture which are based on one single material – bamboo sheet laminate – and on the the manipulation of traditional interlocking woodworking techniques.

Dovetail joint by Jair Straschnow

Dovetail joint by Jair Straschnow

A good example is Jair’s reworking of the dovetail joint, an old principle of slotting pieces of wood that have opposing sloped angles to wedge themselves against one another – without any need for screws or glue.

Assemly of the Dovetail Trestle

Assemly of the Dovetail Trestle

The beauty of Jair Straschnow’s pieces lies in the obvious logic of the construction which also enables the user to assamle the pieces intuitionally.

'Twisted Table' by Jair Straschnow

'Twisted Table' by Jair Straschnow

Assembly of 'Twisted Table'

Assembly of 'Twisted Table'

to the Aram Gallery website

to the Aram Store

to the Jair Straschnow website

Tue 21.7.

Whitechapel by Pli

Posted by NoéMie Schwaller on 21.07.2009 - Tagged as: , , , ,

Designed for disassembly, for easy storage or refurbishing: Whitechapel by Pli

Designed for disassembly, for easy storage or refurbishing: Whitechapel table by Pli

An understated yet sophisticated coffee table design with soft corners and warm tones; the Whitechapel table by Pli is an expression of elegant eco-design and the simple use of high-quality materials. Solid caramel bamboo is supported by four strong pressed steel legs with deceptively slender profiles, finished in gloss powdercoat paint in a selection of colours to suit your interior. The table is designed and made in the UK using cutting-edge technology and established manufacturers.

Whitechapel pushes the limits of sustainable materials: precise detailing in nested joints between steel and bamboo.

Whitechapel pushes the limits of sustainable materials: precise detailing in nested joints between steel and bamboo.

 

more products from Pli @ Architonic

Sat 27.6.

‘Stickbee’ by Andreas Wiehl

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 27.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , , , ,

'Stickbee' by Andreas Wiehl

'Stickbee' by Andreas Wiehl

Andreas Wiehl is Munich-based artist, art teacher and self-proclaimed inventor. With ‘Stickabee’ he presents a smart modular system and provides hope that art classes don’t have to end with painting and pottery.

‚Stickbee’ is a modular furniture system based on the 60-degrees angle. Six basic elements are monted to a hexagon, with no tools required. Two or more hexagons connect via a pug-in module, namely the ‚pirat’. The resulting structure, similar to a honeycomb, becomes more stable with its size increasing, thus making gaps in betweeen the elements possible. Thus the system can take a variety of shapes and can function as a shelf, a cupboard, a table, a bench, a chair or any combination of the latter.

'Stickbee' by Andreas Wiehl

'Stickbee' by Andreas Wiehl

more images @ Architonic

Extension of an orphanage in Noh Bo by TYIN Tegnestue

Extension of an orphanage in Noh Bo, Thailand by TYIN Tegnestue

In February the five young Norwegian architects of TYIN unveiled this fantastic extension of an orphanage in Thailand.

TYIN tegnestue is a non-profit organization working humanitarian through architecture. The projects are financed by more than 60 Norwegian companies, as well as private contributions.

The workers called the houses ' Soe Ker Tie Hias' which means 'Butterfly houses'

The workers called the houses ' Soe Ker Tie Hias' which means 'Butterfly houses'

In the fall of 2008 TYIN travelled to Noh Bo, a small village on the Thai-Burmese border. The majority of the inhabitants are Karen refugees, many of them children. These were the people we wanted to work for.

A few months prior we came in touch with Ole Jørgen Edna from Levanger, Norway. Edna started his orphanage in Noh Bo in 2006, and was now in need of more dormitories. From sheltering 24 children, the orphanage would grow to house almost 50. The Soe Ker Tie project was finished in February 2009.

Inside

Inside

The main driving force behind the project was to somehow recreate what these children would have experienced in a more normal situation. We wanted every child to have their own private space, a home to live in and a neighbourhood where they could interact and play. These six sleeping units are our answer to this.

Because of their appearances the buildings were named Soe Ker Tie Hias by the workers; The Butterfly Houses. The bamboo weaving technique used on the side and back facades is the same used in local houses and crafts. Most of the bamboo is harvested within a few kilometers of the site. The special roof shape of the Soe Ker Tie Houses enables an effective, natural ventilation, at the same time as it collects the rain water. This renders the areas around the buildings more useful during the rainy season, and gives the possibility of collecting the water in drier periods.

more info at ArchDaily