Posts tagged as 'architectural sculpture'

'Lieu-dit Le Temple' installation by Les Etablissements Tourneux

‘Lieu-dit Le Temple’ installation by Les Etablissements Tourneux

‘Lieu-dit Le Temple’ is a “temple/hut” created by artist Ann Guillaume and architect Camille Tourneux to host votive statuettes like those used in Gallo-Roman era religious practices. The installation was built at the Bliesbrück-Reinheim archeological park on the border of France and Germany.

 

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'Underground Parking' by Jens Reinert

Architectural models are fascinating enough. Nevertheless the work of the German educated graphic designer Jens Reinert offers some new perspectives on our architectural surroundings. Instead of complete buildings Reinert models their fragments or visualises the volumes of subterranean spaces – it seems he builds “negatives” of architecture we ususally only perceive from the inside.

Some of Jens Reinert’s work will be showcased within the soon-to-open exhibition ‘Realstadt – Wishes Knocking on Reality’s Doors’ in Berlin – a selection of around 300 utopian and realistic architectural and planning models and 80 exemplary projects from all over Germany which desribe the desire for rethinking our concept of urban living. The exhibition will be open from October 2, 2010 to November 28, 2010 at Kraftwerk Mitte, Berlin.

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'Huts' on the facade of Centre Pompidou in Paris by Tadashi Kawamata, photo by Hervé Véronèse, Centre Pompidou, 2010

The Japanese artist Tadashi Kawamata is well known for his architectural installations made from humble, sometimes recycled materials such as cardboard boxes or disused timber. One of his newest creations are wooden huts hanging like wesp’s nests between the beams and pillars of the structural facade of Centre Pompidou in Paris. With their look of improvisation the small parasites build a strong contrast to the highly technical appearing “Refinery” – this is how Parisians call the Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers building from 1977.

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'CORNER NO. 2' by Ron Gilad, photo with courtesy of Wright

With strong black outlines made from enameled brass Israel born and New York based artist Ron Gilad defines spaces of miniature architecture. Sometimes only a corner, sometimes a whole facade, the spatial fragments of his series ‘SPACES ETC.’ seem to question our relationship with the architectural environments. Trained as an industrial designer at the prestigious Bezalel Academy of Art and Design in Jerusalem Ron Gilad primarily worked on furniture, products, and tabletop objects. Today he obviously moves with between disciplines and materials.

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Mon 16.11.

Tape installations by Rebecca Ward

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 16.11.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

'Tape 10' by Rebecca Ward, 2007

'Tape 10' by Rebecca Ward, 2007

With her architectural installations the young US artist Rebecca Ward creates impressive effects by using nothing more than different coloured isolation tape.

'Tape 10' by Rebecca Ward

'Tape 10' by Rebecca Ward

Utilizing existing lines, beams, and angles, each piece I create is informed by the individual site and its unique linear movement… I choose patterns and shapes according to detailed measurements of the installation site. Ideally these patterns are numerically symmetrical or somehow numerically balanced, producing a dialogue between line and space”, explains the artist.

'seventeen is sharp' by Rebecca Ward, 2009

'Seventeen is sharp' by Rebecca Ward, 2009

'Rip and Pull' by Rebecca Ward, 2007

'Rip and pull' by Rebecca Ward, 2007

'Black mountains' by Rebecca Ward, 2009

'Black mountains' by Rebecca Ward, 2009

to the Rebecca Ward website

'Line to Line' by Phillip K. Smith, III at the Royale Projects in Indian Wells, CA

'Line to Line' by Phillip K. Smith III at the Royale Projects in Indian Wells, CA, photo by David Blank

In spring 2009 the Californian gallery Royale Projects in Indian Wells showcased the first solo gallery exhibition of the US artist Phillip K. Smith III. ‘Line to Line’ is a temporary installation made of polystyrene, styrospray and latex paint.

'Line to Line' by Phillip K Smith III, photo by David Blank

'Line to Line' by Phillip K Smith III, photo by David Blank

Here is what the artist explains:

“Could two-dimensional marks be the window to a three-dimensional space beyond? Transforming from a line to a line, this piece creates a distinct exterior and interior relationship with the space within which it is contained. Between the opposing “lines” lies the dimensional structure of the sculpture, defining at once its peripheral skin and the internal space of the form itself. Shifting between two and three dimensions, the linear graphics of this interior space suggest the perspectival representation of an infinite void.”

'Line to Line' by Phillip K Smith III, photo by David Blank

'Line to Line' by Phillip K Smith III, photo by David Blank

By the end of 2009, the 55′ tall fiberglass sculpture, “Inhale/Exhale,” and the 12′ tall steel tube sculpture, “Clarity,” will both be installed at the University of La Verne, just north of Pomona, CA.

to the Phillip K Smith III website

to the gallery’s website

'Garbungsstädte' in Halle, Germany by Dagmar Schmidt

'Garbungsstädte' in Halle, Germany by Dagmar Schmidt, photo by Ronald Kunze

The large East German prefabricated apartment buildings, known as ‘Plattenbau’ (compound of ‘Platte’ – panel and ‘Bau’ – building) on one hand were a cheap way to solve the country’s housing shortage, on the other hand they corresponded to the political understanding of socialistic living. Even though these apartments were considered highly desirable in GDR, since 1989 decreasing population and modern housing led to high vacancy rates. Many of the apartment buildings, at some places even entire living areas, are being torn down.

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

With her accessible architectural sculpture ‘Grabungsstädte’ (eng.: excavation) the German artist Dagmar Schmidt reminds of a time when these areas were filled with life, and she points to the problems of the changing social space.

She used the walls of one torn down building, the original footprint of six three-room apartments and refurnished them with concrete furniture. Like this Dagmar Schmidt created a beautiful metaphor for the disappearing substance of thousands of people’s homes.

High vacancy rates in the Plattenbau areas of former GDR

High vacancy rates in the Plattenbau areas of former GDR, photo by Gottlob Philipps

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

'Grabungsstädte' by Dagmar Schmidt

to the Dagmar Schmidt website