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Posts tagged as 'ArchDaily'

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tombal Architecten

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tombal Architecten, photo by Hennie Raaymakers

The Dutch Rocha Tombal Architecten recently finished this single family house in Utrecht / Netherlands.

“From a basic form, defined by the municipal urban plan, sculptural “eyes” emerge with direct views to the varied countryside landscape. The form and orientation of the building avoid visual contact with the adjacent houses: at the ground floor the angled ceiling of the kitchen accentuates the intensive contact with the garden. On the first floor, the different shaped openings in the roof and façade offer, like “fingers of light”, varied daylight experiences.”

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tomal Architecten, photo by Hennie Raaymakers

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tomal Architecten, photo by Hennie Raaymakers

“The routing through the house starts in the hall, a section of the ground floor volume. After experiencing the entrance area and passing the gigantic pivoted door, the visitor arrives at the “heart of the house”, the kitchen. Here he looks through the big glass wall straight into the garden, which suggests being outside again. Behind him, the stair cuts a wooden wall inviting to follow the route towards the first floor. Its angled form and extreme proportions (small and high) and the daylight entering from the ceiling, offer the feeling of walking in a medieval street.”

'House Bierings' by Roche Tombal Architecten, photo by Hennie, Raaymakers

'House Bierings' by Roche Tombal Architecten, photo by Hennie, Raaymakers

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tombal Architecten

'House Bierings' by Rocha Tombal Architecten

more information at ArchDaily

to the Rocha Tombal Architecten website

'Matosinhos Housing' by A2G Arquitectura

'Matosinhos Housing' by A2G Arquitectura

The entire surroundings were, for decades, an industrial area dedicated to sardine and tuna canning. In these old and sometimes derelict sardine factories, lies a significant part of the Matosinhos collective memories. From a solid and representative industrial unit rises the outer limit of the building itself.

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

The material used in its construction, concrete and zinc corrugated sheets on facades, will throw us directly to the memory of its predecessor. For years the work of Eduardo Chillida has been amazing me for its simplicity. Showing sceneries by simple abstraction of solids. From an undivided and opaque bloc he works solids out that allow possible visual architectural views. A subtlety of action will define the same creation and definition of typologies, by subtracting matter to the original bloc. By clipping out and moving backwards the glass panes for the windows thus making visible the sub division of the apartments themselves, rhythm and individuality is created. Rooms, lounges, kitchens are visible.

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

In growing, the building requires human indicator factors. Presence. The slabs mark horizontal divisions for the floor levels. All windows return light back to the inside of the original block. From the outside, we become aware of some typologies for the apartments. Some don’t require privacy, some blatantly do, and again a rhythm of elements is imposed on the façade to hide dwellers.

continue article @ ArchDaily

39571 InfoWash, planned and built by students of Parsons The New School for Design

39571 InfoWash, planned and built by students of Parsons The New School for Design

Designed and constructed by students in an academic design/build program, 39571 InfoWash is a direct response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina in the small town of DeLisle, Mississippi. In an attempt to meet both the physical and emotional needs of the community, the project houses both a 24-hour Laundromat and an organization which provides rebuilding assistance to local residents. The simple task of washing one’s clothes thus provides immediate relief while easing community members into the long and complicated process of reconstruction. Because of its program and context, 39571 InfoWash has a responsibility to provide a physically and psychologically sheltered realm, while at the same time projecting an open and inviting presence to its community.

39571 InfoWash is built for the inhabitants of DeLisle, Mississippi, a small city which was very distroyed by Hurricane Katrina

39571 InfoWash is built for the residents of DeLisle, Mississippi, a small city which was distroyed by Hurricane Katrina

Composed of two volumes connected by a covered breezeway, the southern side of the building is sheltered by a deep overhanging roof, while a translucent polycarbonate northern wall provides ample daylight to interior spaces and allows the building to glow at night. A panelized wood slat screen attached to aluminum straps wraps both the opaque and translucent walls tying together the program elements while adding a degree of warmth and familiarity to the expression of the facades. Western Red Cedar was chosen as the primary exterior material because of its resistance to insects, its workability, and its natural weathering characteristics.

Combining elements that address the short-term and long-term needs of the community, 39571 InfoWash attempts to offer residents a return to normalcy and provide much needed services once taken for granted.

39571 InfoWash

39571 InfoWash

The project was envisioned by local resident, Martha Murphy, who saw an opportunity to engage the students of The Design Workshop after a conversation with Federico Negro, a graduate from the Master of Architecture Program and a member of SHoP Architects. SHoP Architects were in DeLisle working with Martha Murphy to rebuild immediately after Katrina hit, and provided critical input and support for the Design Workshop project.

39571 InfoWash, provides a 24-hour laundromat and an organisation which provides rebuilding assistance to local residents

39571 InfoWash, provides a 24-hour laundromat and an organisation which provides rebuilding assistance to local residents

Architects: The Design Wirkshop, Parsons The New School for Design
Location: Delisle, Mississippi, USA
Spring Studio Instructor: David J. Lewis
Summer Studio Instructor: Terry Erickson
Summer Staff: Joel Stoehr
Students: Huy Bui, Ivan Chabra, Sarah Coffin, Christian Eusubio, Dominique Gonfard, Kailin Gregga, Dominic Griffin, Parker B. Lee, Laura Lyon, Kip Katich, Nora Meehan, Shana Sandberg, Emily Wetherbee
Architect of record: Shop Architects
Client: Mississippi Katrina Fund, with special thanks to Martha Murphy, Kathi Heinzel, Bill Heinzel, and Loretta Lizana
Consulting Structural engineering: Dunne & Markis Consulting Structural Engineers
Engineer of Record: Goeffrey Clemens / Compton Engineering P.A. (Bay St. Louis, MS)
Constructed Area: 185.8 sqm
Photographs: Laura Lyon & Ivan Chabra

more information @ ArchDaily

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen in Romsdalen / Norway

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen / Norway

Tourist routes through Norway’s dramatic countryside are very popular. In the last couple of years some impressive architectural projects along these routes – view points, platforms and rest areas, commissioned by the Norwegian Public Roads Administration – received a lot of attention. The investment in the development of 18 road sections into tourist routes passing through the unique Norwegian natural landscape, shall contribute to strengthening trade and industry as well as settlement, particularly in the outer regions of Norway. The various enhancement sites have been designed by a series of Norwegian and international architects, landscape architects and designers. One beautiful example is the Tourist Route Trollstigen designed by the Norwegian Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter.

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen by Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter

Here is what the architects say:

The project will enhance the experience of the Trollstigen plateau’s location and nature. Thoughtfulness regarding features and materials will underscore the site’s temper and character, and well-adapted, functional facilities will augment the visitor’s experience. The architecture is to be characterised by clear and precise transitions between planned zones and the natural landscape. Through the notion of water as a dynamic element –from snow, to running and then falling water- and rock as a static element, the project creates a series of prepositional relations that describe and magnify the unique spatiality of the site.

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen

The National Tourist Route Trollstigen

more images @ ArchDaily

to the Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter website

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

In 2006 the Chilean architect Alejandro Aravena founded Elemental – a “doing tank”, that’s how he calls the practice, which is working in association with Copec, a Chilean oil company, and the Catholic University on large-scale projects . Recentely Elemental realised their first U.S. project, dormitories and dining facilities for St. Edward’s University in Austin, Texas.

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

What the architect says:

“There were 2 debates running in parallel in this project. One more explicit, declared in various documents and that were the actual programmatic requirements to be addressed. The other one, that even though was named in some documents as “compliance with Master Plan” was far less explicit and came out mainly in the meetings: it was the question of the language and appearance of the building and its relation to the old buildings of the campus.

The formal assignment was to provide the new dormitories (300 beds), dining facilities and various students’ services for St. Edward’s University in Austin Texas.”

Photo by Cristobal Palma

Photo by Cristobal Palma

“We thought that a dorm is like a monastery: it’s about how to organize a collections of repetitive small cells and how to relate them with larger special pieces. In the case of the monastery it’s about the monks’ cells and how the relate them with the refectory and chapel. Here it was about the rooms and the dining hall and common facilities. Both of them have to do with old atavist situations: sleeping, studying and eating. Or to put it in a more suggestive way: feeding the body and the soul and digesting.

There are two great examples of how to answer paradigmatically to this problem:

The first one in the late 40`s, when Alvar Aalto designed the Baker House for MIT in Cambridge, where he created a meandering form with the repetitive units to see as a foreshortened figure the Charles river and in one of the inlets of the rooms’ strip he accommodated the special piece. In a way his operation can be described as having a strip and a volume and with them create a place. (1+1=3)

The second one in the 60’s, when Louis Kahn designed the Erdman Hall, where he used the cells to enclose and define a core that worked as the special piece. Instead of adding pieces, he synthesized cells and special volume into a single operation; he actually repeated the operation 3 times. [(1+1=1) x3 = 1]“

continue @ ArchDaily

to the Alejandro Aravena website

Mon 10.8.

House in Kohoku by Torafu

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.08.2009 - Tagged as: , , , ,

House in Kohoku by Torafu

House in Kohoku by Torafu

There is no need for much space for sophisticated buildings and who knows that better than people from Japanese metropolises. On 67 sqm the architects of Torafu planned this detached house with a rather modest living area of 7.5 x 7.5 meters near Yokohama.

House in Kohoku

House in Kohoku

What the architects say:

This site is located in a quiet residential region reclaimed on a hill of Yokohama. With neighboring houses lined very close together, this flag-shaped site meets a road at a verge of no more than 3 meters in width. Since the site is tilted to the north, and the neighboring house to the south is two-storied and built on a higher ground, at first it seemed almost impossible to let in light from the south, although the client, a married couple who has lived in this place for a long time, wanted a small but sunshiny house of one-story just as their child became independent from them.

The rooflights

The rooflights

The roof which looks as if barnacled lets in light through the glass on the top of the tube-shaped windows that are set avoiding shades and eye gaze of the neighbors. On the inside of the house clearly appear the shapes of these tubes,and the arris of a kind of folded plate roof softly separate the whole residential space. The house being one-storied, we were able to form the roof with freedom. And taking advantage of the freedom, we aimed to make the exterior and the interior appear as two sides of the same object.

Although the main living area is no larger than approximately 7.5 x 7.5 meters, we tried to give appropriate distance among the scenes of food, clothing and housing by moderately separating every space along the arris of the ceiling and by making the most of the height of the ceiling itself. High arris connect neighboring spaces, and low arris separate them into, for instance, a living room and a bedroom. Infixed at the space where the ceiling is highest is a wooden mass. Inside the mass are a kitchen, bathroom and sanitation facilities, while the top of the mass is used as a designing office for their son. The top of the mass, which is a lot like a loft, and other spaces are visually separated but family members presence can be felt when they are there.

more information @ ArchDaily

to the Torafu website

Mirage dance hall by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

Mirage dance hall by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

In 2006 Fredrik Kjellgren and Joakim Kaminsky won the international architecture competition for a new dance hall in Falsterbro, Sweden. In the same year they also started their studio Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture.

The Mirage replaces a 1930´s dance hall, which was destroyed by fire 30th of May 2006.

Mirage by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

Mirage by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

Here the architects´ statement:

Façades:
The façades of the building are clad in boards of graphite gray fibercement and mirror glass. The mirrors are placed in a pattern inspired by the wooden facade and windows of the old dance hall.

The repetitive pattern

The repetitive pattern

Inetrior:
Much emphasis was put on designing spaces with extraordinary acoustic qualities. A custom made damping wall was designed in collaboration with an acoustic expert. The wall consists of a black acoustic felt covered by white wooden boards of various dimensions which creates strong graphical elements in the whole building. The wall has proven no more expensive than standard solutions.

Construction:
The building is constructed with prefabricated concrete elements. This has not only proven an economically feasible solution, the heavy construction also helps keeping the noise inside, to the joy of worried neighbors living nearby.

Mirage by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

Mirage by Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture

more info on the Kjellgren Kaminsky Architecture website

seen at ArchDaily

Wed 10.6.

Design It: Shelter Competition

Posted by Nora Schmidt on 10.06.2009 - Tagged as: , , ,

Shelter by Frank Lloyd Wright

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum and Google today announced the launch of Design It: Shelter Competition, a global, online initiative that invites the public to use Google Earth and Google SketchUp to create and submit designs for virtual 3-D shelters for a location of their choice anywhere on Earth. The competition opened June 8, 2009, Frank Lloyd Wright’s birthday; closes to submissions on August 23.

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

Shelter design by students of the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture

The competition takes its inspiration from Learning By Doing, an exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum’s Sackler Center for Arts Education curated by David van der Leer, the museum’s Assistant Curator of Architecture and Design, which features plans, photographs, and models of shelters built by students at the Frank Lloyd Wright School of Architecture. For the past seven decades, students at the school have taken on the challenge of designing, building, and living in small shelters nestled in the landscape of the school’s Arizona Taliesin West campus and recently on the Taliesin campus in Wisconsin as well. In addition to providing hands-on management and construction experience, the shelter program encourages students to consider human needs for safety and comfort as well as the relationship between architecture and place. Inspired by the program, the Design It: Shelter Competition opens Wright’s challenge to the world by asking participants to design an ideal shelter in a location of their choice and in response to that location. “We hope this competition will raise awareness of the role that architecture and design can play in everyday life while stimulating a sense of joy for design,” said van der Leer.

to the competition´s website

seen at ArchDaily

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