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Posts tagged as 'apartment building'

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

The Japanese SAKO Architects realised this Housing complex in south-west of Beijing. It consists of four residential building, as well as one commercial building. ‘Bumps’ is one of this months WAN Awards entry in the Residential category.

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

'Bumps' by SAKO Architects

more information at Word Architecture News

to the SAKO Architects website

 Paswerk with 119 homes in Haarlem / Netherlands by Architectuurstudio HH

Paswerk with 119 homes in Haarlem / Netherlands by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by

The Amsterdam-based Architectuurstudio HH realised this energy-efficient residential neighbourhood in Haarlem in 2007.

Plaswerk by Arcchitecturrstudio HH

Paswerk by Architecturrstudio HH, photo by Herman van Doorn

Here is what the architects explain:

“In Haarlem there is a green belt between the Schalkwijk area and the River Spaarne, where a number of small-scale businesses existed for many years. Here we have developed, together with Blauwhoed Eurowoningen, a residential neighbourhood with 119 homes in a way that preserves the area’s landscape qualities. The housing layout is extremely flexible with a number of basic options that can be extended in various ways. High-quality architecture, external environment, sustainable building, flexibility and energy-conscious/energy-efficient construction were the key points of departure for this project. The houses are highly energy-efficient and have low-temperature underfloor heating combined with a heat recovery system with solar water heater and heat pump. ‘Mossedum’ roofs reduce the cooling load and can absorb a significant amount of rainwater.”

Patio, Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Katja Effting

Patio, Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Katja Effting

Parkland

“Paswerk nestles in a medieval peat excavation landscape with narrow strips of land reflected in the irregular rhythm of the east-west orientated ditches. This ditch pattern was interrupted at Paswerk.

The development of a new residential park on the Paswerk site is an opportunity to enhance the character of the peat landscape between the Engelandpark and the River Spaarne by reconnecting existing ditch fragments and laying ponds in a way that hardly affects the topography and preserves the existing stands of old trees. Opening up the residential park into three strips allowed residential building to be interwoven with the peat landscape. A trio of new, lengthened lakes gives identity to the three residential clusters and provides a logical transition to the surrounding area, as well as a storage place for the rainwater from the roofs. The shoreline is occasionally broken to accommodate a stand of old trees. And the houses are positioned in such a way that the existing old trees supplemented with new ones can stay where they are between the houses, or new ones be planted where necessary.

Completely new parkland is created thanks to a compact building typology. To preserve the parkland identity there is virtually no ground level parking in the plan. All houses have a parking space in one of the buildings’ underground garages, which also contain parking space for visitors.”

Plaswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Marijke Mooy

Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Marijke Mooy

Differentiated housing

“The Paswerk plan includes 119 houses, 78 of which are patio houses and 41 canal houses and town houses. The single-storey patio houses have roof gardens and terraces on top.”

Flexibility

“The patio houses consist of two ‘naves’: one with bedrooms, bathroom, storage space, entrance and patio, and one that is not subdivided containing the living room/kitchen. The great width of the house (8.10 m) allows the brief to be tailored to individual requirements, whereby one can choose between living on the street side or around the patio. Or one can opt to live up on the roof garden and roof terrace floor, with the possibility of a void to the ground floor.”

Facing the sun

“All the houses face south. The town houses have large façades and conservatories on the south side. The patio houses have their living area on the north side of the patio, creating an outdoor space on the south side. The houses are highly energy-efficient.”

Paswerk: green neighbourhood

“The houses are positioned across the site in a way that allows the existing valuable trees to remain in place between the houses or new ones to be planted. Public recreational land consists primarily of green strips planted with trees on the banks of the broad water features. By placing the parking facilities in the buildings (large garages encapsulated in the town houses) the neighbourhood looks car-free (little traffic) and there are plenty of safe places for children to play near and in between the houses.”

Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Katja Effting

Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Katja Effting

Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Marijke Mooy

Paswerk by Architectuurstudio HH, photo by Marijke Mooy

to the Architectuurstudio HH website

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse, Zurich

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse, Zurich

The Zurich based Architects huggen berger fries designed this apartment building in a quiet quarter surrounding Idaplatz which was created towards the end of the 19th Century.

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

The residential building closes the last gap in the quarter.

The building consists of an existing courtyard building and a new building facing the street. The apartments on the four lower floors cover both the new and the older sections. The small units of the old building accommodate the bedrooms, while the new section contains the living rooms, the naturally lit staircase and the large entrance hall. The two upper floors also contain a duplex apartment.

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

The glazed ceramic cladding’s profile and light reflections accentuate the tower-like volumetric upward development. The form and colour of the ceramic plates were specially developed for the building. The facade is based on a back-ventilated Sto-Verotec system. The solid window linings highlight the monolithic character and bind the building into the periodic style of the rest of the street’s architecture. The ornamental railings enclose the structure and create a connection with the sky.

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

Stadthaus Zurlindenstrasse

to the huggen berger fries website

'Lanserhofwiese' in Salzburg / Austria by Wimmer Zaic

'Lanserhofwiese' in Salzburg / Austria by Wimmer Zaic

Housing shortage is a major urban problem, especially for alpine countries. In 2005 the city of Salzburg developed an overall housing concept which included the creation of at least 300 apartments per year. Apart from new site development on the outskirts, urban densification of existing residential areas was included.

One successful example is the project ‚Lanserhofwiese’ by the Austrian architects Wimmer Zaic Architects. The 74 000 sqm site is covered with buildings of the 1970s which the Salzburg-based architects completed with four extended apartment blocks and one solitaire.

The solitaire

The solitaire

Here is what the architects say:

The buildings along Moosstraße are rhythmical, and quiet, and linear. By their structure they do not form a barrier against Moos­straße but are in an interaction with street and surrounding buildings. There are insights and vistas. Between the buildings, which stand in varying distances to each other, there are free spaces of ways. The buildings have three storeys and in the fourth storey there are some punctual cubes.

The buildings along Moosstraße are painted with the basic colours “red/yellow/blue”and the mixed colour “green”. On each building these colours are applied in varying nuances so that a differentiated and lively aspect is created.

Walers along the street

Extended apartment blocks along the street

The buildings are oriented towards west, the sides of the buil­dings towards Moosstraße have covered walks (outdoor corridors) which provide noise protection. The apartments have loggias facing west which are formed by retractions into the skins of the buildings. The parapets have parapet walls so that the plaster facing is continued. Through the loggias the deep sun shines into the buildings but the high sun is shut out. This concept also contributes to the aspect of saving energy: the windows to the west are large, which enables the natural use of solar energy and the reduction of artificial energy.

In the centre of the building site a solitaire rises and towers the other buildings along Moosstraße in its third dimension. This “solitaire” is meant to decisively enlarge the pattern of the whole site. The large space inside allows a building of that size, a point of orientation in an otherwise free view on the surroundings.

The zone of the ground floors is kept free and transparent. Thereby a hovering and airy picture of the tower is achieved. Only the vertical element – the glass lift tower – is to be seen.

View from the solitaire

View from the solitaire

The succinctness of the tower is – apart from its dimensions – achieved by its quiet plaster facing, which has only punctual windows. Only in the uppermost storey there is a round band of balconies with a round glass parapet. On the other hand there are cubes protruding from the tower which are also marked by their colouring. The cubes are covered by large aluminum plates which give the tower a somewhat strange appearance. Onto the plates pictures of the “Sahara” are printed, a sa­tellite photograph of Geospace Ltd. They can also be found on the retreating walls of the “solitaire”.

Project team: Robert Wimmer, Michael Zaic, Dagmar Braitenthaller, Daniel Drücker, Manuel Dornstauder, Thomas Hahn, Martina Lodek, Thomas Kögl, Petra Waldmann, Reinhard Wimmer

Start of planning process: February 2000

Start of construction: May 2004

Date of completion: October 2007

Construction costs: about 10 Mio. €

Land area: about 74.000 square meters

Net floor area: about 5.500 square meters

Gross floor area: about 12.000 square meters

Cubic contents: about 33.0000 cubic meters

to the Wimmer Zaic website

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

This is the Songzhuang Artists’ Residence designed by DnA in Beijing, China. Located right next to east sixth ring road of Beijing city, Songzhuang Artist Village is undergoing a dramatic expansion of artist population and increasing demand of artist’s working and living space, a 20-units artist residence facing a fishpond at a former outdoor storage lot is one of the local developments targeting such demand.

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

The programmatic requirement of working and living defines the height and geometry of both volumes: 6m height for working and 3m for living; a simple rectangular box for studio and a complex geometry for living indicating bedroom, kitchen and toilet. Living volume is plugged into working volume either on the same level or led by stair to upper level. Corrugated metal as exterior cladding and red brick for horizontal surfaces are used to reflect both industrial and village character.

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

Songzhuang Artist Residence by DnA, Photo by Iwan Baan

These 20 units are regarded as containers stacking up on this former industrial outdoor storage lot, creating an expressive configuration and spatial quality. The interplay of volume and void, light and shadow allows artists and visitors to constantly explore and experiment the outdoor community space, which could be the extension of art production and presentation as well as linking these 20 units as 20 individual showrooms on open studio days.

In other words, this complex becomes an alternative museum for living art creation and exhibitions.

Photo by Iwan Baan

Photo by Iwan Baan

via Dezona

to the Iwan Baan website

to the DnA website

'Matosinhos Housing' by A2G Arquitectura

'Matosinhos Housing' by A2G Arquitectura

The entire surroundings were, for decades, an industrial area dedicated to sardine and tuna canning. In these old and sometimes derelict sardine factories, lies a significant part of the Matosinhos collective memories. From a solid and representative industrial unit rises the outer limit of the building itself.

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

The material used in its construction, concrete and zinc corrugated sheets on facades, will throw us directly to the memory of its predecessor. For years the work of Eduardo Chillida has been amazing me for its simplicity. Showing sceneries by simple abstraction of solids. From an undivided and opaque bloc he works solids out that allow possible visual architectural views. A subtlety of action will define the same creation and definition of typologies, by subtracting matter to the original bloc. By clipping out and moving backwards the glass panes for the windows thus making visible the sub division of the apartments themselves, rhythm and individuality is created. Rooms, lounges, kitchens are visible.

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

Matosinhos Housing by A2G Arquitectura

In growing, the building requires human indicator factors. Presence. The slabs mark horizontal divisions for the floor levels. All windows return light back to the inside of the original block. From the outside, we become aware of some typologies for the apartments. Some don’t require privacy, some blatantly do, and again a rhythm of elements is imposed on the façade to hide dwellers.

continue article @ ArchDaily

Hedorf's Residence Hall by KHR Architects

Hedorf's Residence Hall by KHR Architects

The Danish KHR Architects show with their newest work, that buildings made of precast concrete elements don´t have to look like giant, monotonous blocks of flats by force. The repetative façade of their Hedorf Residence Hall, which reminds of some positive examples of socialistic GDR architecture of the 1960s, is based on the geometrically shaped bay window, which breaks the building´s surface on the one hand and creates spacious and dynamic apartments on the other.

Precast concrete facade

Precast concrete façade

What the architects say:

“To get government funding for the residence hall, we had to keep a very strict budget. Therefore, we turned to sandwich panels as a way to solve the financial aspect of the project. At the same time we also wanted to change the bad reputation concrete has. We wanted to show that it is possible to create exciting architecture with sandwich panels and inspire others working with the material to give more thought to the design”, says Mikkel Beedholm architect and partner in KHR arkitekter.

The facade's pattern is based on the bay window

The façade's pattern is based on the bay window

The bay window from the inside

The bay window from the inside

In the corner of the bay window is a triangular window. The window is constructed with the dense concrete wall behind, which has the effect that the window almost mirrors in the window frame.

“Normally you place the front wall just in front of the back wall, men I made the factory design the elements so that the back wall is drawn away from the front wall. The effect is a more slim expression at the window and because of the light is mirrored in the interior white recess, the building also let more light out to the street. It is a small detail with a great effect – the entire building becomes slimmer and less bombastic than usual”, says Beedholm.

Hedorf's Residence Hall by KHR Architects

Hedorf's Residence Hall by KHR Architects

to the KHR Architects website

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