Posts tagged as 'apartment building'

Thu 7.8.

Edison Student Residence by Kanva (CA)

Posted by Walter Phillips on 07.08.2014 - Tagged as: , ,

Edison Student Residence by Kanva, photo: Marc Cramer

Edison Student Residence by Kanva, photo: Marc Cramer

The historical context of the site for a student residence in Montreal, Canada lead to the exploration of an innovative concrete fabrication technique; photoengraved concrete panels that enable the building to tell a story.

 

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'K5' apartments by Reiuld Ramstad Arkitekter, photo by Reiulf Ramstad Architekter and Thomas Bjørnflaten

The Oslo based Reiulf Ramstad Arkitekter realised this apartment complex in Grünerløkka, a borough of the Norwegian capital which used to be a typical working class area in the 19th century and is today one of Oslo’s hippest quarters. The block of the ‘K5′ building is a rare remaining example of the intimate blend of housing and small scale industry and the new structure is designed with special appreciation of this environment.

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'A House' by Holgaard Arkitekter, photo by Adam Moerk

‘A House’ in Copenhagen is the conversion of an old disused 1960s industrial building in the Copenhagen Harbour. The Danish Holgaard Arkitekter transformed it into a number of very attractive apartments, keeping its typical industrial character with cast concrete, cast floors and surfaces of granite.

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tecARCHITECTURE HQ by tecARCHITECTURE, photo by Peter Allgaier, tec Architecture

The Switzerland and US based architecture and design practice tecARCHITECTURE (CH) and tecDESIGN (US) recently unveiled their new Headquarter in the city of Ermatingen on Lake Constance. Tec’s new offices are part of the building as well as two rental apartment units and a house for tec coo Heiko Ostmann and his family.

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ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

Where an old industrial building used to be, in the northern outskirts of their hometown, the Milano based practice LPzR Architetti realised this apartment building with 25 residential units.

ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

“The new building completes the urban landscape by connecting the façades and covering the blind walls of the adjacent constructions. According to the height range of surrounding buildings, ERA 3 has from five up to seven storeys. Basement and mezzanine host parking lots.

The building is a manifesto of complexity in contemporary architecture. The volumetric composition shows a sequence of addictions and subtractions. A wide range of materials like plaster, zinc, wood, concrete, steel, glass, stones, are combined together to underline the arrangement of volumes and surfaces.

The construction of the volume is based on the aggregation of modules of 45 sq m (GFA), which is considered as the minimum surface of a living unit. Bigger apartments are made of two modules. Outdoor living spaces play an important role in design criteria.”

ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

ERA3 - Eraclito Housing, photo by Gabriele Pranzo-Zaccaria, Chiara Pranzo-Zaccaria

to the LPzR Architetti profile @ Architonic

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

New Poverty = New Richness: With the realisation of this apartment building in Zwolle / Netherlands the Rotterdam based architectural practice Atelier Kempe Thill created 64 new highly comfortable social housing units and offered an alternative to the typical deck-access housing of the 1970s.

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

“At the dawn of a new era of neo-liberalism in Europe, social housing is once again regarded with increasing indifference. The implicit assumption is that apartments for the lower social classes ought to be small, cramped, dark, badly built and ugly.
Architecture in the sense of a building art hardly plays a role here, for marketing and spatial qualities are regarded as unimportant and superfluous.
Furthermore, social housing developments are facing great financial pressures due to a tightening of environmental laws, which entails a considerable increase in costs for technical equipment and building components, and negatively affects design opportunities.
International star-architects barely show any interest in the topic. Accordingly, very few alternatives (to standard solutions) are being produced which, by becoming showcases, could act as catalysts to break out of the recent stasis.
The Hiphouse project in Zwolle presented Atelier Kempe Thill with a welcome opportunity to fundamentally question the assignment ‘social housing’. Largely due to the client’s ambition and the active support of urban planners, a prototypical project could be realized without exceeding a typical Dutch standard budget for comparable projects. A radical minimization of architectural means and a visible assertion of the processes and technologies of the building process helped to realize a maximum of living quality.”

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

“The deck-access typology is the most common form of multi-story social housing in the Netherlands, because a large number of apartments can be connected to a limited number of stairwells. Despite the social stigma this typology has come to represent, it remains an almost inevitable solution. Due to its extreme cost-efficiency it is still being employed today in large numbers. The very compact building typology realized through the central circulation in Zwolle offers an economic and competitive alternative.
The building block, measuring 23m x 32m and providing 8 units per floor, has a very limited facade surface in relation to its floor area; this favourably affects building costs and enables the high quality detailing of the facade. The housing units are organized around a central core containing a double stair and an elevator. The plan layout allocates the larger apartments to the spatially interesting corners, thus creating apartments with double orientation.
The smaller studio apartments either face east or west, guaranteeing optimum sunlight for all apartments. To compensate for its volumetric compactness, the building’s surface is consistently glazed. Anodized aluminium profiles hold the high quality solar-protection glazing to form the facade. Depending on the viewer’s position the building appears to be covered by a transparent skin or a reflective surface; furthermore, sliding doors provide generously dimensioned facade openings.
As a whole, a very delicate visual balance is achieved. The functional grid of the windows and the underlying construction form a rigid architectural order, which is counterbalanced by a spontaneous collage of colourful apartment interiors. In a display of the complexities of city life a vital and optimistic image emerges, striking up intensive communication with the neighbourhood. This image is collective as well as individual, for it is – consciously or unconsciously – formed with the active participation of every inhabitant. The ‘building in use’ therefore essentially becomes the facade.”

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

'HipHouse Zwolle', photo by Ulrich Schwarz, Berlin

more information about the project @ Architonic

to the Atelier Kempe Thill profile @ Architonic

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

The Danish architectural practice C.F. Møller recently unveilded this new apartment building – a conversion of an old disused silo complex into a ‘rural high-rise’, with 21 high-quality residences composed as individual and unique ‘stacked villas’.

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

“The ‘stacked villas’ are an alternative to standard apartments or to detached suburban sprawl, and are a mix of single storey flats and maisonettes, meaning that even the lower levels fully get to enjoy the views, and that no two flats are the same.

The actual silo contains staircases and lifts, and provides the base of a common roof terrace. Around the tower, the apartments are built up upon a steel structure in eye-catching forms which protrude out into the light and the landscape – a bit like Lego bricks.

This unusual structure with its protrusions and displacements provides all of the apartments with generous outdoor spaces, and views of Aarhus Bay and the city itself. Similarly, every apartment enjoys sunlight in the morning, mid-day and evening, whether placed to the north or south of the silo structure.”

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

The interlaced annexes create intimate living spaces with a maximum of direct natural light.

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

'The Sil(o)houette' by C.F. Møller Architects

Silo before conversion

Location: Løgten, Denmark
Client: Løgten Midt A/S
Architect: C. F. Møller Architects in collaboration with Christian Carlsen Arkitektfirma
Landscape Architect: C. F. Møller Architects
Engineer: Niras
Size: 3000 m2 (silo conversion housing), 1500 m2 (mixed-use urban centre)
Year: 2004-2010


to the C.F. Møller Architects profile @ Architonic

seen @ Dagensdesign

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

This serpentine apartment builduing in the center of Tokyo was designed with the collaboration of three Tokyo based architectural practices: Nakae Architects, Akiyoshi Takagi Architects and Ohno Japan.

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

“This 8-unit rental apartment house complex was designed to house motorcycle enthusiasts, with a built-in garage included in every unit.
The building is located on a flag-shaped plot near the apex of a triangular block, with a certain degree of open space toward the main road to the south.
The c-shaped design was a practical decision to allow the residents to access their apartments through a common alley that leads right to the center of the complex. The wall on the entrance side was curved to provide maximum space on the outside, while guaranteeing sufficient volume for each apartment unit and wall length to fit 8 entrance doors. The resulting little square avoids giving the impression of a narrow and dark dead end, and allows the residents to rotate their bikes easily.
The walls separating each apartment unit were disposed in a radial pattern, each with a gentle curve that leads them to meet the external wall at a right angle. By connecting the angles of each room, the curved walls contribute to give the impression of a more spacious environment. The entire structure is designed as an extension of the road, smoothly following the movement of its residents as they drive through the alley, enter the central square, park their motorcycle in the garage and move upstairs to their living quarters.”

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

“The building is a reinforced concrete structure composed of seven walls and a slab. The main characteristic of the structure lies in the fact that the reinforced walls, composed of an in-plane rigid frame of columns and beams, were disposed in a radial pattern. The walls rely on the transfer of horizontal force from the slabs instead of using perpendicular beams. They are in fact vertical cantilevers fixed in the foundation of the building. Although the centrally-oriented radial displacement is vulnerable to rotational forces, the changing angles of each wall reinforce the structure’s resistance.
Because the structure of the building relies on the seven interior walls, the exterior wall was handled using a dry construction method. This allowed us to continue studying the emplacement and size of the wall openings in accordance with the uneven surroundings until the very last moment of the construction process. The functions of each wall are also enhanced by a clear division of their roles: structure and sound insulation for the interior walls, openings and thermal insulation for the exterior walls. Despite their curve, the interior walls always meet the outside wall at right angles, preventing the presence of sharp corners and thus improving livability.
On the entrance side, each floor is fitted with a continuous strip of curved windows, with a comparatively wider opening on the second level. The orientation of each room was set to avoid a direct view of the opposite apartment. Combined with a double-paned window, this setting provides a peculiar feeling of privacy.”

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

'NE apartment', photo by Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

Design team:
Yuji Nakae / NAKAE ARCHITECTS
Akiyoshi Takagi / Akiyoshi Takagi Architects
Hirofumi Ohno / Ohno JAPAN

Project partners:
General Constructor: FUZZY, CO., LTD.

Site Area: 201.89m2
Building Area: 96.34m2
Total Floor Area: 289.02m2
Structure: Reinforced Concrete and Steel, 3 stories
Maximum Height: 8050mm
Design Period: Dec.2006 – May.2007
Construction Period: Jun.2007 – Dec.2007


to the Nakae Architects profile @ Architonic